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Where do i start? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hie,

    I have never done anything in computers save for the hardware stuff and how to type, search for stuff.  Now i need to study IT i was thinking of starting with MCSE certifications.  Is it a good idea or i have to start with something less challenging? And what can be less challenging than MCSE. Please help me i'm really new to this but i have a passion for systems operations.

    Zoe
    Thursday, February 5, 2009 8:24 PM

Answers

  • Well welcome to the I.T. world! You took the first step by Starting, and doing the Research now. Good for you.

    Okay. Let me ask you a few questions so we can put you on the right path.

    What would you like to do in the field. There are quite a few job roles and specialties out there. If you are just starting out, I doubt you have experience in any of them. But you have to start somewhere.
    So what would you like to do in the IT field? I know you probably don't know yourself right now, and that's okay because no commitments have been made.

    I would take a look here: https://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/credential/default.mspx and get familiar with most of the credentials Microsoft offers. Some would tell you to start out with ComTIA's A+ and Network+ certifications. And that would be good advice if you want to repair computers and understand the theology of networking; but pretty useless if you want to be a developer or something unrelated. So that is why I have to toss the ball back to you to perform some additional research and finding what you will enjoy doing.

    So do me that favor of reviewing the site above, and let us know as a career changer what your interests are in the I.T. field. This will help us maximize your time, money and resources and not have you chasing certifications that you will never use or do not enjoy.

    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician, Consumer Support Technician
    MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration,
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate.
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 9:44 PM
  • Hi  Zoe,

    The MCSE is from the old generation of certifications that ended with Windows Server 2003.  That's not to say that it is no longer an active certification, but if I were starting out in the year 2009, I would hardly start with a certification for a previous iteration of server, that requires seven exams for its completion.

    For Server 2008, the path is more modular.  Initially there are three Microsoft Certified Technical Specialist (MCTS) certifications, that roughly track to AD (640), Infrastructure (642) and Application Servers (643).  One exam equals one certification.  The more advanced Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP), has two varieties in the general server sphere, the Server Administrator (646) and Enterprise Administrator (EA).  The MCITP in SA also require the 640 and 642 exam.  The MCITP in EA requires 640, 642 and 643 plus one of the several available Vista exams (I suggest 620).

    Most would compare the MCITP in SA to the MCSA and the MCITP in EA to the MCSE.  You will also find a number of MCTS and MCITP certifications available for specific server specializations such as Exchange Server or the System Center Servers.

    Depending or your background, the MCTS in Server 2008 AD, Configuring (640), is a good jumping off point.  That exam followed by the 642 and 646 will provide you with an MCITP in SA.

    Best of luck on your certification path.

    Allan


    MCT, MCITP Server 2008 EA & SA, Exchange 2007, Vista Ent & Cons MCTS Vista, WSS 3.0, MOSS 2007, Exchange 2007, OCS 2007, Server 2008 AD, Infrastructure & Application, SC SysMgr 2007 MCSE/A (Windows 2003, 2000), MCDST, MODL
    • Proposed as answer by Allan Jacobs Friday, February 6, 2009 7:16 PM
    • Marked as answer by Ken Rosen_MS Thursday, March 5, 2009 10:26 PM
    Friday, February 6, 2009 7:16 PM
  • Well you have to start somewhere. And in your case, as with many others, that would be the client requirements.

    Normally I would say to anyone that you meet the recommended proficiency as prescribed by Microsoft before getting the certification. And I still would say that. However, that doesn't mean you cannot start your studies. :)

    In your situation, I would recommend learning about computers and networking. I would recommend that you first look into CompTIA's A+ certifications. This will teach you not only how to diagnose, troubleshoot and repair computers, but you will build a solid foundation with Microsoft desktop operating systems. Understand, just by earning this certification it in no ways binds you to just repairing desktop computers. It is a stepping stone. Once you achieve that, CompTIA has another certification called Network+. And as the name implies, it deals with the fundementals of networking.

    Once you achieved these certifications, you will have a foundation to build upon. Then we will move you to Microsoft certifications.

    Now you can go straight to Microsoft certifications, but with zero experience and being a career changer; I would not recommend this. You will get overwhelmed, frustrated and probably quit. Unfortunately, I have seen this behavior often.

    So what do you think?
    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician, Consumer Support Technician
    MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration,
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate.
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 10:51 PM

All replies

  • Hi  Zoe,

    The MCSE is from the old generation of certifications that ended with Windows Server 2003.  That's not to say that it is no longer an active certification, but if I were starting out in the year 2009, I would hardly start with a certification for a previous iteration of server, that requires seven exams for its completion.

    For Server 2008, the path is more modular.  Initially there are three Microsoft Certified Technical Specialist (MCTS) certifications, that roughly track to AD (640), Infrastructure (642) and Application Servers (643).  One exam equals one certification.  The more advanced Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP), has two varieties in the general server sphere, the Server Administrator (646) and Enterprise Administrator (EA).  The MCITP in SA also require the 640 and 642 exam.  The MCITP in EA requires 640, 642 and 643 plus one of the several available Vista exams (I suggest 620).

    Most would compare the MCITP in SA to the MCSA and the MCITP in EA to the MCSE.  You will also find a number of MCTS and MCITP certifications available for specific server specializations such as Exchange Server or the System Center Servers.

    Depending or your background, the MCTS in Server 2008 AD, Configuring (640), is a good jumping off point.  That exam followed by the 642 and 646 will provide you with an MCITP in SA.

    Best of luck on your certification path.

    Allan


    MCT, MCITP Server 2008 EA & SA, Exchange 2007, Vista Ent & Cons MCTS Vista, WSS 3.0, MOSS 2007, Exchange 2007, OCS 2007, Server 2008 AD, Infrastructure & Application, SC SysMgr 2007 MCSE/A (Windows 2003, 2000), MCDST, MODL
    • Proposed as answer by Allan Jacobs Friday, February 6, 2009 7:16 PM
    • Marked as answer by Ken Rosen_MS Thursday, March 5, 2009 10:26 PM
    Friday, February 6, 2009 7:16 PM
  • Hey Zoe...

    Before I send you off in the certification wilderness, let's talk. :)

    You said you NEED to study IT. Are you changing careers, or is this apart of a new duty in your current employment?

    Will you be designing, securing and administering Microsoft Windows Servers (2003 and/or 2008 versions) domains?

    Tells us a little more of what's going on and we can help you out with better clarity!
    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician, Consumer Support Technician
    MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration,
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate.
    Saturday, February 7, 2009 12:09 AM
  • Hie Michael

    What is happening is i'm changing careers, for some reasons. So i'm new to the IT world. I really need to know where to start.

    Regards
    Zoe
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 9:27 PM
  • Well welcome to the I.T. world! You took the first step by Starting, and doing the Research now. Good for you.

    Okay. Let me ask you a few questions so we can put you on the right path.

    What would you like to do in the field. There are quite a few job roles and specialties out there. If you are just starting out, I doubt you have experience in any of them. But you have to start somewhere.
    So what would you like to do in the IT field? I know you probably don't know yourself right now, and that's okay because no commitments have been made.

    I would take a look here: https://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/credential/default.mspx and get familiar with most of the credentials Microsoft offers. Some would tell you to start out with ComTIA's A+ and Network+ certifications. And that would be good advice if you want to repair computers and understand the theology of networking; but pretty useless if you want to be a developer or something unrelated. So that is why I have to toss the ball back to you to perform some additional research and finding what you will enjoy doing.

    So do me that favor of reviewing the site above, and let us know as a career changer what your interests are in the I.T. field. This will help us maximize your time, money and resources and not have you chasing certifications that you will never use or do not enjoy.

    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician, Consumer Support Technician
    MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration,
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate.
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 9:44 PM
  • Thanks for the site, i did the review and i would like to do MCSE and be a systems engineer.  BUT I have no experience and i don't seem to fit the candidate profile of MCSE on Windows Server 2003 certification (typically have at least one year of experience implementing and administering both network and client operating systems). So i don't know if it is a good idea to just start without any experience.
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 10:39 PM
  • Well you have to start somewhere. And in your case, as with many others, that would be the client requirements.

    Normally I would say to anyone that you meet the recommended proficiency as prescribed by Microsoft before getting the certification. And I still would say that. However, that doesn't mean you cannot start your studies. :)

    In your situation, I would recommend learning about computers and networking. I would recommend that you first look into CompTIA's A+ certifications. This will teach you not only how to diagnose, troubleshoot and repair computers, but you will build a solid foundation with Microsoft desktop operating systems. Understand, just by earning this certification it in no ways binds you to just repairing desktop computers. It is a stepping stone. Once you achieve that, CompTIA has another certification called Network+. And as the name implies, it deals with the fundementals of networking.

    Once you achieved these certifications, you will have a foundation to build upon. Then we will move you to Microsoft certifications.

    Now you can go straight to Microsoft certifications, but with zero experience and being a career changer; I would not recommend this. You will get overwhelmed, frustrated and probably quit. Unfortunately, I have seen this behavior often.

    So what do you think?
    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician, Consumer Support Technician
    MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration,
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate.
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 10:51 PM
  • i will look into CompTIA's A+ certifications just like you said.  I guess i will be starting from there.  Thank you so much for the help. God bless.

    Good day
    Zoe
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 11:10 PM