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Dell Latitude laptop stuck at Please Wait... screen. RRS feed

  • Question

  • We have one Dell Latititude E6510 laptop that will boot very slowly.  It is stuck for about 15-20 minutes and then logs in to our Windows Server 2008 network.  I installed Malwarebytes & Superantispyware and scanned the laptop and didn't find any viruses or malware.  I ran the Autoruns utility from sysinternals and found an Office Activation fail like it was trying to activate Microsoft Office 2010 but I disabled that from running but after rebooting the laptop takes 15-20 minutes.  Is there something else I can check?  I even disabled all the non Microsoft services in MSCONFIG and that didn't help.
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014 8:28 PM

Answers

  • 1. Restart in F8 menu and find here Enable Boot Logging: This option turns on logging when the computer is started with any of the Safe Boot options except Last Known Good Configuration. The Boot Logging text is recorded in the Ntbtlog.txt file in the %SystemRoot% folder.

    2. There is a great difference between long boot and long logging. For analysis of long logging/connecting to server:

    a. Look into Event logs for errors and warnings

    b. Network monitor will help you to comprehend what is happening in your system. Wireshark would do the job for you.

    3. What have you done before it starts to happen? Installations, configuration, updates, etc.

    4. Look into Dell forum. Chances are that you are not alone and someone else has had the same problem.

    5. If nothing helps then Dell technical support is your last resort... (Model specific problems, faulty parts,...)

    Regards

    Milos


    • Edited by Milos Puchta Wednesday, February 19, 2014 9:09 PM
    • Marked as answer by MikeK321 Sunday, November 1, 2015 3:20 PM
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014 9:06 PM
  • For details of F8 menu see knowledge base article http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315222

    Rgds

    Milos

    • Marked as answer by MikeK321 Sunday, November 1, 2015 3:20 PM
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014 9:08 PM
  • That is why it is useful in corporate environment to prepare images. You only save data and restore standard installation*). If you have more computers of the same model, it pays off. Alternatively you make use of WSUS that make this tedious task with update itself.

    If you reinstall computer instead of repairing it, this is sometimes faster procedure but you are lossing information about the cause(s) of trouble(s).

    Every method has it pros and cons.

    Regards

    Milos

    *) In well designed system there is a minimum of data stored locally only and you can "lost" installation safely for faster reimaging.

    • Marked as answer by MikeK321 Sunday, November 1, 2015 3:20 PM
    Saturday, February 22, 2014 12:16 PM
  • I ended up reimaging the computer.  The 250 gig hard drive was completely full.  When I turned it on yesterday it took an hour to bring up the login screen on our network.  I wanted to run Process Monitor to see what was running in the background during startup or even Process Explorer but didn't have a lot of time has I had to get Windows 7 reinstalled as quick as possible.

    Hi,

    Generally, to find out what happened, we recommend you to create a boot trace with WPT.

    First, you should start with installing Windows Performance Tools Kit. Read here how to install it.

    http://www.msfn.org/...howtopic=146919

    And then run the following commands with elevated administrator privileges.

    xbootmgr -trace boot -traceFlags BASE+CSWITCH+DRIVERS+POWER -resultPath C:\TEMP

    At last, upload the file you generated.


    Andy Altmann
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Karen Hu Wednesday, March 5, 2014 2:42 AM
    Sunday, February 23, 2014 3:53 AM

All replies

  • 1. Restart in F8 menu and find here Enable Boot Logging: This option turns on logging when the computer is started with any of the Safe Boot options except Last Known Good Configuration. The Boot Logging text is recorded in the Ntbtlog.txt file in the %SystemRoot% folder.

    2. There is a great difference between long boot and long logging. For analysis of long logging/connecting to server:

    a. Look into Event logs for errors and warnings

    b. Network monitor will help you to comprehend what is happening in your system. Wireshark would do the job for you.

    3. What have you done before it starts to happen? Installations, configuration, updates, etc.

    4. Look into Dell forum. Chances are that you are not alone and someone else has had the same problem.

    5. If nothing helps then Dell technical support is your last resort... (Model specific problems, faulty parts,...)

    Regards

    Milos


    • Edited by Milos Puchta Wednesday, February 19, 2014 9:09 PM
    • Marked as answer by MikeK321 Sunday, November 1, 2015 3:20 PM
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014 9:06 PM
  • For details of F8 menu see knowledge base article http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315222

    Rgds

    Milos

    • Marked as answer by MikeK321 Sunday, November 1, 2015 3:20 PM
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014 9:08 PM
  • The laptop did need about 98 Windows updates after Windows 7 service pack 1. 

    I ended up reimaging the computer.  The 250 gig hard drive was completely full.  When I turned it on yesterday it took an hour to bring up the login screen on our network.  I wanted to run Process Monitor to see what was running in the background during startup or even Process Explorer but didn't have a lot of time has I had to get Windows 7 reinstalled as quick as possible.

    • Edited by MikeK321 Friday, February 21, 2014 10:59 PM
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014 9:11 PM
  • That is why it is useful in corporate environment to prepare images. You only save data and restore standard installation*). If you have more computers of the same model, it pays off. Alternatively you make use of WSUS that make this tedious task with update itself.

    If you reinstall computer instead of repairing it, this is sometimes faster procedure but you are lossing information about the cause(s) of trouble(s).

    Every method has it pros and cons.

    Regards

    Milos

    *) In well designed system there is a minimum of data stored locally only and you can "lost" installation safely for faster reimaging.

    • Marked as answer by MikeK321 Sunday, November 1, 2015 3:20 PM
    Saturday, February 22, 2014 12:16 PM
  • I ended up reimaging the computer.  The 250 gig hard drive was completely full.  When I turned it on yesterday it took an hour to bring up the login screen on our network.  I wanted to run Process Monitor to see what was running in the background during startup or even Process Explorer but didn't have a lot of time has I had to get Windows 7 reinstalled as quick as possible.

    Hi,

    Generally, to find out what happened, we recommend you to create a boot trace with WPT.

    First, you should start with installing Windows Performance Tools Kit. Read here how to install it.

    http://www.msfn.org/...howtopic=146919

    And then run the following commands with elevated administrator privileges.

    xbootmgr -trace boot -traceFlags BASE+CSWITCH+DRIVERS+POWER -resultPath C:\TEMP

    At last, upload the file you generated.


    Andy Altmann
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Karen Hu Wednesday, March 5, 2014 2:42 AM
    Sunday, February 23, 2014 3:53 AM