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"Timesheet' for equipment resource - MSPS 2010 RRS feed

  • Question

  • In Project Server 2010 and Project Pro 2010 I am trying to collect hours on use of equipment, like an aircraft.  This equipment resource is responsible for carrying out a task and status updates are required on its usage, although equipment obviously cannot fill in their own timesheet.


    Presently, the best idea I have found is using the ‘Assignment Owner’.    The project manager designates an Assignment Owner who is different from the assigned resource.   The Assignment Owner is responsible for providing progress updates and status reports to the project manager about these assignments...at least that is the plan.  

    The process I went through in Server 2010 is:

    • Open Resource Center>Select Equipment Resource>Edit Resource>Add the Assignment Owners Name in box.  Assignment owner is another resource in the Enterprise Resource Pool.
    • Apply the equipment resource to multiple tasks in multiple projects and publish the projects to the Server
    • Then, in Resource Center>Timesheet Adjustment>Click on box of 'My Resources Unsubmitted Timesheets' and up comes a row that shows a place for a timesheet for the equipment, but the message is 'Not yet created'. 
    • Which leads me to believe that a timesheet for the Equipment resource can be created, but I have yet to discover how to do it.

    I can see the 'Demand' for the resource by publishing all the projects to PWA that claim it on a task.  But I am struggling with a method (process?) of seeing usage. 

    I am not wedded to the Timesheet idea.  Rather, I want to see usage of this shared equipment resource across all the projects that use it.

    Thanks, Steve

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 9:47 PM

All replies

  • Stephen --

    In this situation, the assignment owners for tasks assigned to the equipment resource will need to enter progress for the equipment resource in the Tasks page of PWA and not in the Timesheet page.  Then they can submit progress for the use of the equipment according to your needs.  Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 9:59 PM
    Moderator
  • Steve,

    There are actually two assignment owners. The one in the Resource Center is the default assignment owner and will be used by default. In the project itself, you can insert the Assignment Owner field in a usage view and override the default assignment owner. In that case, the new owner would do the status updating.

    I'm assuming you've created a work resource to do this. You should be able to use the Resource Availability or Assignment view from Resource Center to see where it's being demanded. The business rule would have to dictate how to reserve it (i.e. schedule 8 hours to reserve all day).

    How are you defining usage differently from demand? If the resource can't be reserved for another project, then technically isn't it being used? Therefore, demand could equal usage as well.

    Treb Gatte | Blog | Twitter | CIO Magazine Blog

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015 11:35 PM
    Moderator
  • Dale and Treb, thank you for these answers.  Based on this advice I think I can more clearly describe what I am trying to do.  I may be using 'demand' and 'usage' differently than how I am coming across in the post above.

    Say 5 projects all want an aircraft on the same day, which of course over-allocates it as only one project can actually have it.  I want to show this over-allocation to the ultimate arbiter of 'who gets it when' - which is the resource owner that controls the aircraft.   These decisions are done in an off-line scheduling meeting with many other variables in play than what you would plan in MS Project.  It must be done in discussions.

    If other Project Managers have 'claimed' all available time in MSPS for that aircraft by being the first to publish their plan, I do not want any other PM to be denied their request just because they published their plan later.  I want to see it as even more over-allocation, or 'demand'.

    I understand that I can see this in Resource Availability. I am still trying to figure out how to allow this over-allocation, because the I believe the Project Pro plans are being affected by lack of availability of the resource.  But I believe I can do that by upping the units the equipment can work to beyond what all projects could possibly request.  It is an arbitrary max capacity, but at least I can show the resource owner what PMs are asking for.  He knows what the aircraft can actually fly and will readily see that the requests outstrip the real capacity, regardless of what I set for the peak.

    Now, the decisions are made...PM1 gets it on Day 1, PM2 gets it on Day 2 and 3, and so on.  The PM updates their project plan with when they have been allocated for that resource.  Each PM records the actual usage of the aircraft as it is being used, but here is where I get lost.  Where do they record that usage?  I don't see anywhere in Tasks at the Server level where I can record usage for the aircraft, although I have set myself as the Assignment Owner for the resource.  Do I assign Assignment Owners for the task that the resource is assigned to at the Project Pro level?  Which means someone working on each project would record usage for just that project.  And if so, can I roll that up to see what the usage was per day for the last 6 months? And present the actuals to the Resource Owner, which is not on any task on any project as a person.  Rather, their aircraft is on the projects.

    The only thing I would add is that under Resource Center>Timesheet Adjustment>Click on box of 'My Resources Unsubmitted Timesheets', where I am the Assignment Owner for the resource, up comes a row that shows a place for a timesheet for the equipment, but the message is 'Not yet created'.   Does this mean that one could be created?  The equipment would have to have a login account, for which I could then create a delegate? 

    I hope I am not confusing the issue more, but this is about as best as I can describe what I am trying to do.

    Thank you for your time and consideration.

    Stephen Meyer

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 2:16 AM