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weird disconnected network interfaces are un-deleteable RRS feed

  • Question

  • using ipconfig i see this

     

    C:\Users\Administrator>ipconfig
    
    Windows IP Configuration
    
    
    Ethernet adapter Cable:
    
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
      Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : 
      IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 
      Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 
      Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 
    
    Ethernet adapter OYA:
    
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
      IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 
      Site-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : 
      Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : 
      IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
      Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
      Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
    
    Ethernet adapter VirtualBox Host-Only Network:
    
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
      Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : 
      IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.56.1
      Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
      Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 8:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 9:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 11:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 13:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 14:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 18:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 19:
    
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
      IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . :
      Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 25:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 16:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    
    Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 17:
    
      Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
      Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    

    They appear as an IPv6 interface on netsh

    I have 3 questions:

    1) what does the asterisk mean?
    3) how do i know to which physical (or virtual) device they are related
    2) how do i remove them, netsh seems to fails

     

    Monday, January 17, 2011 9:27 PM

All replies

  • Hello,

    do you talk about the Tunnel adapaters? They belong to IPv6 and are created by default. If no problems exist just leave them alone. IPv6 is coming fast and some applications already require it.

    If you still like to remove them follow: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929852


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    Monday, January 17, 2011 11:12 PM
  • I am having some network quircks. But I don't want to disable IPv6, just have it enables as a tunnel interface for LAN and Internet connections. So deleting those which are disconnected is what I need.

     

    Any idea on the asterisk sign?

    Monday, January 17, 2011 11:40 PM
  • Hello,

    "am having some network quircks" this is not a really helpful description. The asteriks i have no idea about, think is is used for the numbering of the multiple adapters.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    Monday, January 17, 2011 11:51 PM
  • I'm not trying to solve the network issues I'm trying to figure out why I can't delete those tunnels and which device they try to tunnel to. I have several disabled/inactive network devices and I think it's their tunnels, so they should be visible AFAIK.

    trying to delete them via netsh gives this

     

    netsh interface ipv6>show int
    Idx  Met   MTU   State        Name
    ---  ---  -----  -----------  -------------------
    (...)
     36   50   1280  disconnected  Local Area Connection* 16

    netsh interface ipv6>del int 37
    Catastrophic failure

    I'm guessing I should remove IPv6 from the tunneled physical/virtual device. but the problem is it is in Hidden state (either unplugged or something like that).

    this is the list of my existing adapters (including hidden ones)
    http://i54.tinypic.com/23h2hah.jpg

    I've no idea what those isatap's are but they seem to be the tunnels (under details -> service it says tunnel).

    And as for the asterisk, Its either a mark for a Tunnel Adapter or a mark for a Disconnected Adapter, trying to figure out which. But I doubt it's used for numbering since in normal Adapters it's not present.

    Update: deleting those isatap adapters seemed to do the trick, but some of the disconnected adapters still exist. And here comes my first question back. How do i know which "Local Area Connection* N" belongs to which installed Adapter?

    Tuesday, January 18, 2011 12:25 AM
  • I can answer 2 of my own questions after some tryouts:

     

    2) you can look for the FriendlyName (network adapters name e.g "Local Area Connection") in the registry and you will get the Device's "Device Instance Path" which you can match up in the Device Manager. Sounds kinda nasty, best I could get, though :p

    3) you have to delete the device itself to delete that interface from the Device Manager

    Tuesday, January 18, 2011 12:42 PM
  • 2) you can look for the FriendlyName (network adapters name e.g "Local Area Connection") in the registry and you will get the Device's "Device Instance Path" which you can match up in the Device Manager. Sounds kinda nasty, best I could get, though :p

    3) you have to delete the device itself to delete that interface from the Device Manager

    _ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _- __ -_ - _-

    Hello Meow123,

    Dec. 05 2012  14:28~14:36  w7u7sp1

    There is a similar problem with my Win 7 Ultimate sp1 . Tried what you posted here above, that  del caused => unable access windows; some wired del failured.   see the attach , how a stranger MAC connecting to ISP before I do it , the unknown. ?!

    Del F:\  back after reboot... (OEM vender said it is theirs as though...)

    BEST REGARDS

    BLEUOISOU

    Wednesday, December 5, 2012 6:36 AM