locked
windows 7 slow login to domain and shutdown RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am having some issues with my windows 7 x64 ultimate running really slow when logging in to the domain and shutting down. I takes up to 5-8 minutes to login and shutdown. I've got the gpsvc log file of what's running. I'm not really sure on how to read these types of files. Is there anyone that can debug or check the issue out.

    http://www.theteamikon.com/thinoaphay/gpsvc.zip

    any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Monday, December 14, 2009 6:20 PM

Answers

  • I have to agree with Mark on this - unless you are the network admin, it's not your problem.  ;)

    That said, my gut instinct (and, experience) is that it's probably a bad NIC.  You (or the admin) can try reloading the NIC driver; but, be ready to drop a NIC into the machine.
    Other possibilities are a damaged LAN cable (either your patch cable, the drop itself, or your drop's patch cable in the closet), or a faulty port on the switch.
    Easy test:  once it's (finally) done logging on to the domain, try pinging, well, anything on the network that's pingable (the DC, gateway (if a separate box), local server, printer - anything.  If you see any dropped packets or timeouts, or crazy-high ping times, the issue is with the network connection (and, likely, faulty hardware.)

    Explanation:  excessive latency on the network connection (for whatever reason it occurs) will cause the system to 'hang' while logging on to the domain (notably, while processing Group Policy.)  If it happens to completely time out, you'll simply log on using cached credendtials and policies (assuming that your domain policy allows this, of course), and it'll update policy when possible. 
    If, though, there is a semi-functional network connection (just enough for it to, technically, "work"), it'll haaaannnnnngggggg on logon.

    HTH,
    Chris
    [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    Tuesday, December 15, 2009 4:10 AM

All replies

  • Have you tried contacting your admin that is applying the group policies and letting them know about this issue? They may already be aware of this and have a fix.
    Mark Morowczynski|MCT| MCSE 2003:Messaging, Security|MCITP:ES, SA,EA|MCTS:Windows Mobile Admin|Security+|http://almostdailytech.com
    Tuesday, December 15, 2009 3:47 AM
  • I have to agree with Mark on this - unless you are the network admin, it's not your problem.  ;)

    That said, my gut instinct (and, experience) is that it's probably a bad NIC.  You (or the admin) can try reloading the NIC driver; but, be ready to drop a NIC into the machine.
    Other possibilities are a damaged LAN cable (either your patch cable, the drop itself, or your drop's patch cable in the closet), or a faulty port on the switch.
    Easy test:  once it's (finally) done logging on to the domain, try pinging, well, anything on the network that's pingable (the DC, gateway (if a separate box), local server, printer - anything.  If you see any dropped packets or timeouts, or crazy-high ping times, the issue is with the network connection (and, likely, faulty hardware.)

    Explanation:  excessive latency on the network connection (for whatever reason it occurs) will cause the system to 'hang' while logging on to the domain (notably, while processing Group Policy.)  If it happens to completely time out, you'll simply log on using cached credendtials and policies (assuming that your domain policy allows this, of course), and it'll update policy when possible. 
    If, though, there is a semi-functional network connection (just enough for it to, technically, "work"), it'll haaaannnnnngggggg on logon.

    HTH,
    Chris
    [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    Tuesday, December 15, 2009 4:10 AM