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Customising a numbered list RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I want to create a numbered list which would be in the form of (a), (b), ...but would exclude certain alphabets such as (i) and (o). So, in the list, after (g), i should get (j) and not (i) and similarly get (p) after (n) instead of (o). How do i create such a numbered list? As of now, i have to click on (i) and use the option of defining new number value to (j) or (o). As i need to do it each time i type a list, i want to customise a list so as to do it automatically for me.

    Thanks

    Naveen

    Wednesday, October 17, 2012 12:12 AM

Answers

  • I forgot to say that you can of course do this with { SET } and { REF } fields:

    put 

    { SET mylist1 "(a)<tab>" }

    etc. at the beginning of the document (you can keep them out of the way by putting them in the header I think) then use

    { REF "mylist{ SEQ M }" }

    at the beginning of each list item. Also do-able without VBA and extensible to a large number of special numbering entries.

    Personally I think the Document Variable approach is the neatest but each has its advantages and disadvantages.


    Peter Jamieson

    • Marked as answer by Rex Zhang Tuesday, October 23, 2012 8:25 AM
    Friday, October 19, 2012 7:51 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    There was a typo in the earlier post and this is correction to it. I need to get (j) after (h) and not after (g).

    Thanks

    Naveen

    Wednesday, October 17, 2012 12:15 AM
  • I don't know how you could set this up using the standard numbering features, but you could use a field-based approach. One way to do that is to use a Word Document Variable or Custom Document Property for each list number you want - for example, if your numbering only runs from (a) to (z), then you create Variables/Properties with names and values as follows (where <tab> is actually a tab character)

    mylist1 (a)<tab>

    mylist2 (b)<tab>

    .

    .

    mylist8 (h)<tab>

    mylist9 (j)<tab>

    mylist10 (k)<tab>

    .

    .

    mylist13 (n)<tab>

    mylist14 (p)<tab>

    ...and so on

    Then, for each paragraph in the list, you insert something like

    { DOCPROPERTY "mylist{ SEQ m }" }

    (if you're using properties) or

    { DOCVARIABLE "mylist{ SEQ m }" }

    (if you're using Variables)

    Each pair of {} has to be the special field brace pairs that you can insert using ctrl-F9 on Windows Word.

    You can save that field combination as an autotext/building block for easier insertion.

    If you need to restart the list, you can insert { SEQ m \r0 } at the beginning of the new list.

    With field-based numbering you have to remember to select the fields (e.g. all the fields in the document, via ctrl-A) and re-evaluate them using F9.

    It's not pretty for end users but at least it can be done.

    The main advantage of using Custom Document Properties is that you can set it all up without any VBA. You'll probably need to insert a tab character into a document, select it and copy it in order to be able to paste the tab into the value of each Document Property.

    The main advantages of using Custom Variables are that

     a. the number of Custom Properties you can have is quite small. The number of Variables can be, well, much larger. If you need a list that goes a..z,aa..az, etc. missing i's and o's, you have a chance of doing it with Document Variables and some VBA.

     b. they are "out of the way" of the user in the sense that they can only be maintained using code.

     

    Peter Jamieson


    Thursday, October 18, 2012 2:57 PM
  • To omit numbers in an automatic list, you will have to make manual restarts, which obviously will be difficult to maintain. Also, it defeats the purpose of auto numbering, of course...
     
    Peter’s solution is the way to go.
     

    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP
    Thursday, October 18, 2012 10:30 PM
  • I forgot to say that you can of course do this with { SET } and { REF } fields:

    put 

    { SET mylist1 "(a)<tab>" }

    etc. at the beginning of the document (you can keep them out of the way by putting them in the header I think) then use

    { REF "mylist{ SEQ M }" }

    at the beginning of each list item. Also do-able without VBA and extensible to a large number of special numbering entries.

    Personally I think the Document Variable approach is the neatest but each has its advantages and disadvantages.


    Peter Jamieson

    • Marked as answer by Rex Zhang Tuesday, October 23, 2012 8:25 AM
    Friday, October 19, 2012 7:51 AM