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Possible? IP Office 500-OCS: Show OC Presense Based on Avaya Phone? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I simply want the Microsoft Office Communicator to show presence, based on whether or not a user is on/off-hook on their Avaya 5410 handset.

    -  I'm using an Avaya IP Office 500, with digital handsets, mostly 5410's, but some 5420's, as well
    -  OCS 2007 R2/Office Communicator is used only for Instant Messaging

    I've very confused as to what can do this, if anything.

    Is there anything out there that will allow presence to be determined by my Avaya IPO 500 users' phones?

    • Moved by Matt Sousa - MSFT Thursday, December 17, 2009 11:08 PM forum migration (From:Telephony)
    Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:45 PM

Answers

All replies

  • Hi,
    I think you should check with Avaya if you environment can support Avaya Aura, SIP Enablement Services. This is one chunk in the Avaya integration with OCS 2007. Also verify if your current OCS environment setup is supported for the integration (R1 or R2) from an Avaya point of view.
    kind regards,
    Wim
    Monday, August 3, 2009 2:48 PM
  • That functionality is part of the Remote Call Control feature within OCS which can be established with an Avaya Applicaiton Enablement Services (AES) server.

    Take a look at this blog article for the basic layout: http://theucguy.wordpress.com/2009/02/01/ocs-integration-with-avaya-2-of-2/


    Jeff Schertz, PointBridge | MVP | MCITP: Enterprise Messaging | MCTS: OCS
    • Proposed as answer by Gavin-Zhang Tuesday, August 4, 2009 11:10 AM
    • Marked as answer by Gavin-Zhang Wednesday, August 5, 2009 11:14 AM
    Monday, August 3, 2009 4:14 PM
  • That's funny, you should say that. About Aura AES (Application Enablement Services), that is.

    I searched for solutions myself, and asked my Avaya Sales Manager. I asked my exact question above.  His reply was (I removed the timeframe information),

    "...In terms of what you want to do, AES is not going to help in this case.  We have some "stuff" we're looking at doing in the <XXXXXXX> timeframe that will do this for you..."

    I'm OK paying the extra cost of an Enterprise license of the OCS CAL, in order to get the Remote Call Control features...I'm just having a bugger of a time identifying a solution! Why would Avaya tell me not to buy (more) of their Avaya stuff?!?



    Monday, August 3, 2009 5:31 PM
  • Interesting....  Remote Call Control is an 'old' feature (carried over from LCS) that is slowly being replaced by EV in OCS.
    Jeff Schertz, PointBridge | MVP | MCITP: Enterprise Messaging | MCTS: OCS
    Monday, August 3, 2009 6:52 PM
  • We are also using office communicator 2007 r2.. and are looking to get the avaya ip office 500 phone solution (ip based phones)..

    Do we need something more than just what comes with this phone solution to have precense and be able to use communicator with the phone system.. my avaya rep says we need a 3rd party gateway and licensing, which totals $14k ontop of the $26k price for 40 ip phones..

    I'm confused by this thread as far as what is really needed..

    Any thoughts

    Thanks
    Friday, November 13, 2009 7:58 PM
  • As mentioned above by Jeff, RCC is an "old" feature that was introduced in LCS about 2005. LCS did not have any voice/telephony capability, only RCC.

    For most observers, it was clear from the start that enterprise voice/telephony was on Microsoft's roadmap but also that it would take several years (say about 5) for Microsoft to build up OCS into a comprehensive enterprise voice/telephony solution, one that (in my opinion) will make PBX/IP-PBX irrelevant/redundant/obsolete. We are (again in my opinion) getting there in 2010, on schedule.

    The role of RCC was really to help bridge the gap over those 5 years or so, enabling customers who had recently deployed legacy PBX/IP-PBX to benefit from presence and click to call on "the last PBX they would ever need", prior to moving to OCS Enterprise Voice. That gap-bridging role is becoming less important by the day as OCS gets closer to that point where OCS Enterprise Voice is fully able to meet the needs of enterprises in voice/telephony. From an economic or technical point of view, RCC cannot provide lasting competition with OCS Enterprise Voice, and is being progressively deemphasized in OCS and in Microsoft programs.

    Therefore, most customers no longer need RCC nor want to invest in it at this point, as they recognize the change brought about by OCS. OCS Enterprise Voice is where they want to invest. Buying a PBX/IP-PBX now (and deploying RCC on it) is akin to buying the last horse carriage in 1910, the last vynil record turntable in 1990, or the last videotape in the DVD era... You don't want to be that guy - especially with assets as long lived as the PBX.

    My advice is, don't sign up for 5 to 10 years on vertical PBX technology. Examine if OCS meets your need today (it may not fully yet), or if it will soon (and I believe it will). If needed, extend your current assets for short while longer while you start exploring OCS Enterprise Voice.


    Sunday, November 15, 2009 12:40 AM
  • @FDoremieux Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsI'm not sure I agree with this... this horse and carriage comment. 

    Let's remove the focus on the specific technology (RCC or pixie dust) that is being discussed here. 

    Let me re-iterate: I'm unsure of what technology can accomplish this, but I want my on-hook/off-hook presence to be indicated in MOC.

    Your argument seems to be that everyone wants to go to OCS for their telephony solution. I'm not sure this is the case. For several reasons, mostly surrounding the fact that our current PBX's work fine, and just to get this presence ability alone is not worh the (re-)investment costs to switch to OCS for telehpony:

    *  Changing to OCS would be a significant investment, replacing an otherwise very capable/works good now/it ain't broken, PBX/IP-PBX
    *  Changing to OCS would be a significant investment, replacing physical handsets (this is huge! $200 for a cheap Avaya, upwards of $800 for a Cisco IP handset).. again, replacing handsets that work well as telephony endppoints
    *  Choice:  Who says with all the choices out there we want to go to OCS, of all things?  (I mean, I'm a Microsoft fanboy, but just because it has the logo on it, doesn't mean it will be the right, best, most mature choice: (DPM, is a good example))
    *  Maturity in Market:  Maybe the feature set is there, but what about reliability?  My existing Avaya, I would guess, has several 9's of availability... only time will give us those numbers for OCS
    *  Maturity in Market: If there is another top-tier focused technology (other than anything from Dynamics) from Microsoft that is harder to find information on, I'd be surprised.
    *  Maturity in Market: How do I find a partner who knows what they're doing, regarding OCS telephony?  I realize that me being in the 14th largest market in the country, I'm not in the largest of cities... but still, 14th ain't so bac and I'm darn hard pressed to finding anyone (MS Partner) who knows anything about OCS other than it's IM, Video Conferenceing and Collaboration features...




    Sunday, November 15, 2009 3:18 PM
  • Hmoll - you may be interested in our SmartSIP product, which would allow you to keep your existing SIP-capable phones and use them as OCS endpoints.  http://www.evangelyze.net/products.asp.  It is specifically designed to help bridge the gap for customers who are moving to Enterprise Voice but are not yet in a position to retire their current endpoint hardware investment.

    As for your question about market coverage, I'd say that you should be able to find high quality assistance regardless of location.  We do full UC deployments all over the world using exactly the same UC tools that we are helping our customers to deploy (audio, video, and web conferencing), regardless of location.  This remote services methodology allows customers to receive top-notch consulting regardless of location.  We've done over 60 deployments (and counting) like this with very high success.
    Mike Stacy | Evangelyze Communications | http://www.evangelyze.net/cs/blogs/mike
    Monday, November 16, 2009 5:05 PM
  • In reading this thread, its still unclear to me how you make Office Communicator show Phone Precense/integration, with the Avaya ip office 500 system?

    So far, my avaya vendor has only mentioned ZeaComm.. you have to buy an expensive software plugin to enable these features.. total cost, on the low end is around $5000, requiring a dedicated ZeaComm server (virtual or otherwise)..

    I also saw Avaya's one-x software, and avaya mentions a partnership with MS, but this software looks like a replacement to communicator?

    You would think since Avaya is sip based and Communicator appears to have sip integration, that it wouldnt require an expensive plugin to make this work?

    And, related to the RCC mode, there is also Avaya AES server

    Are there any other ways? Or.. will office communications 2010 work out of the box with the avaya phone system... (is this Microsoft IP PBX ?  sorry, i'm not really 100% up on the voip technologies)..


    Due to this, we are also looking at the NEC UX5000, but i dont think there is any plugins or support out of the box with this phone system either..

    Wednesday, January 13, 2010 4:03 PM
  • Reading the blogpost and the information in this thread I have the following question about the Avaya integration.

    It seems that the that the two systems (Avaya AES and OCS) can be integrated but there could be some limitations in the functionality offered.

    • How mature is the OCS integration based on "Avaya Application Enablement Services" server?
    • Which supplier (other then Avaya) do you think has the best product/offers the best functionality to integrate a call center with OCS (see the complete list of suppliers below)?
      http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/office/ocs/bb735838.aspx

     

    Monday, October 25, 2010 7:23 PM
  • Not to rain on the parade but AES is not part of the IP office prodcut suite.  It's a part of the Enterprise Avaya product line, Communication Manager. 

    • Proposed as answer by NikosVid Wednesday, February 9, 2011 2:01 PM
    Thursday, December 9, 2010 6:30 PM
  • IPO 500 with release 6.1 works perfect as a gateway to MS Lync 2010. Hold music and caller ID, issues that had been reported with previous releases of IP Office are now resolved.

    The only thing that is not clear is presence from the avaya phones to lync client!

    Any answer to this would be appreciated!!!


    NikosVid
    Wednesday, February 9, 2011 2:15 PM
  • IPO 500 with release 6.1 works perfect as a gateway to MS Lync 2010. Hold music and caller ID, issues that had been reported with previous releases of IP Office are now resolved.

    The only thing that is not clear is presence from the avaya phones to lync client!

    Any answer to this would be appreciated!!!


    NikosVid


    Are you saying its working without adding an intermediate gateway device ($2500 +) like one of these:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/lync/gg131938.aspx

    If so.. what was the trick to get it working?

     

    *I forget how you tell which release the ip office is at.. when i launch ip office manager it says v7..

    I've tried putting the ip address of the ip office device into Lync, but this doesnt achieve anything.

     

    Thanks

    Wednesday, February 9, 2011 3:11 PM
  • IPO 500 with release 6.1 works perfect as a gateway to MS Lync 2010. Hold music and caller ID, issues that had been reported with previous releases of IP Office are now resolved.

    The only thing that is not clear is presence from the avaya phones to lync client!

    Any answer to this would be appreciated!!!


    NikosVid


    Are you saying its working without adding an intermediate gateway device ($2500 +) like one of these:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/lync/gg131938.aspx

    If so.. what was the trick to get it working?

     

    *I forget how you tell which release the ip office is at.. when i launch ip office manager it says v7..

    I've tried putting the ip address of the ip office device into Lync, but this doesnt achieve anything.

     

    Thanks

    Yes, it is working without adding an intermediate gateway device.

    The only thing you need is a sip trunk license for IPO.

    v7 is firmware version 5, so you need to upgrade to release 8 (firmware version 6) in order to resolve the below issues:

    Calls routed to the PSTN do not show the real caller ID of the MOC client.

    Calls cannot be muted or put on hold by MOC clients

    All the configuration is available at: https://devconnect.avaya.com/public/download/interop/OCSR2-IPO-PSTN.pdf

    The only thing that I cannot achive is the presence of the IPO phones.

    Any ideas on this???

    Thanks.


    NikosVid
    Thursday, February 10, 2011 11:52 AM
  • IPO 500 with release 6.1 works perfect as a gateway to MS Lync 2010. Hold music and caller ID, issues that had been reported with previous releases of IP Office are now resolved.

    The only thing that is not clear is presence from the avaya phones to lync client!

    Any answer to this would be appreciated!!!


    NikosVid


    Are you saying its working without adding an intermediate gateway device ($2500 +) like one of these:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/lync/gg131938.aspx

    If so.. what was the trick to get it working?

     

    *I forget how you tell which release the ip office is at.. when i launch ip office manager it says v7..

    I've tried putting the ip address of the ip office device into Lync, but this doesnt achieve anything.

     

    Thanks

    Yes, it is working without adding an intermediate gateway device.

    The only thing you need is a sip trunk license for IPO.

    v7 is firmware version 5, so you need to upgrade to release 8 (firmware version 6) in order to resolve the below issues:

    Calls routed to the PSTN do not show the real caller ID of the MOC client.

    Calls cannot be muted or put on hold by MOC clients

    All the configuration is available at: https://devconnect.avaya.com/public/download/interop/OCSR2-IPO-PSTN.pdf

    The only thing that I cannot achive is the presence of the IPO phones.

    Any ideas on this???

    Thanks.


    NikosVid


    We generally have this intermediate company handle any fixes to the ip office system, but they are very very slow to respond.. i do try to do some myself..

    Do you know, can i get the updated firmware and software from a website location and do the change myself?  Is it involved.. assuming have to do it off hours?

    Is there a place in the manager where i can see if we currently have a sip trunk license?

    Do we configure that sip portion in avaya to point to our Lync FE server and vice versa?

    Thanks again

    Thursday, February 10, 2011 5:49 PM
  • CallerID can work in the lync client I know, I have it working.  I did what the previous poster had indicated.  Basically just add the SIP trunk license to IP office and use the guide from avaya as a starting point.  With a little tweaking you can get callerID and other things they didn't in the test lab to work also.  I just started playing with the presence and will post if I have any luck with that.  CallerID just change it from use internal data to * for the URI thingy in your SIP line properties.  I think that was all I did to get callerID to work.  So far from what I read (and I could be way off) is that IP office in the past checked with the OCS CWA service for presence info.  Lync doesn't have CWA although you can add an OCS CWA service to a lync topology.  So that might be the way to go to accomplish this but I am not sure yet as I have not started on presence myself yet to test these things.
    Tuesday, March 1, 2011 5:18 AM
  • We have a support contract with avaya, but they are claiming to upgrade the firmware there is a cost involved, which seems ridiculous to me, then the sip license on top of that.

     

     

    Wednesday, March 2, 2011 3:29 PM
  • CallerID can work in the lync client I know, I have it working.  I did what the previous poster had indicated.  Basically just add the SIP trunk license to IP office and use the guide from avaya as a starting point.  With a little tweaking you can get callerID and other things they didn't in the test lab to work also.  I just started playing with the presence and will post if I have any luck with that.  CallerID just change it from use internal data to * for the URI thingy in your SIP line properties.  I think that was all I did to get callerID to work.  So far from what I read (and I could be way off) is that IP office in the past checked with the OCS CWA service for presence info.  Lync doesn't have CWA although you can add an OCS CWA service to a lync topology.  So that might be the way to go to accomplish this but I am not sure yet as I have not started on presence myself yet to test these things.

    I confirm Direct SIP is a method for CallerID and others to work between IPO and Lync.

    Requirements are just 50$ per 1 Avaya SIP Trunk License (1 simultaneous SIP-voice channel).

    Simple SIP Trunk guide is here (screenshots explain everything): http://habrahabr.ru/post/139268/

    Any progress about RCC / presence?

    Got One-X Portal 8.1 and IP 500 F/W 6.1 running.

    Currently I might use Lync Integration (MSIntegration-6.2.0-SNAPSHOT-LyncIntegrationIPO.zip - a Lync 2010 Client plug-in), but it costs around 40$ per user (it must be One-X Portal-enabled, so at least Avaya Office Worker user license required).






    • Edited by i3laze_ Tuesday, November 26, 2013 1:29 PM
    Tuesday, November 26, 2013 1:09 PM