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Custom Performance Monitor of Exchange 2007 MSExchangeIS\User Count shows same value for all Storage Groups RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All,

    I have been trying to collect performance stats relating to the the amount of users logged on to our Exchange environment. 

    Looking at the following Technet article on monitoring Exchange Mailbox servers (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb201689(EXCHG.80).aspx) I found the following performance counter that seemed appropriate to the task:

    MSExchangeIS\User Count
    Shows the number of users connected to the information store.
    Used to determine current user load.

    So I created a custom Windows Performance Monitor in SCOM and targetted it to the Exchange 2007 Database Server class as that was the nearest one I could see that might relate to an Information Store server or role.  The rule was disabled by definition and then enabled by an override again targeted to the Exchange 2007 Database Server class.  Polling interval was left at the default 15 inutes and the use all instances check-box was selected as part of the initial rule definition.

    I then created my Performance View to graph the data from thie new rule and when enough time started to pas I started to see the data graphed.

    The strange thing is that the graph-line for each of the Storage Groups (databases) for is identical to one  another which is not what I was expecting.

    I was expecting (hoping) to see the User Count for each Storage Group  as an indicator of how much load they are experiencing relativce to each other.

    Can anyone suggest a better target class for the above "Information Store Counters for Determining User Load" as the Technet article terms it?

    Thanking you for your considered replies,

    Michael

     

    Thursday, January 27, 2011 11:26 AM

Answers

  • i think its more of an exchange question as a scom question. SCOM is just the tool to record what you want. However when you not sure what to monitor i suggest to use the performance monitor first, so you can see "real time" what kind of info a counter gives. only when you figured out exactly what you want to monitor, create the rule in SCOM.

    edit: using perfmon for checking SCOM's measurements are correct is a good idea too :).

     


    Rob Korving
    http://jama00.wordpress.com/

    • Proposed as answer by Nicholas Li Monday, January 31, 2011 4:26 AM
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Friday, February 4, 2011 8:54 AM
    Thursday, January 27, 2011 1:18 PM
  •  

    In addition, I would like to share a post which is about targeting rules and monitors with you for your reference:

     

    Targeting Rules and Monitors

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/brianwren/archive/2007/08/22/targeting-rules-and-monitors.aspx

     

    Hope this will give you some hints.


    Nicholas Li - MSFT
    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Friday, February 4, 2011 8:54 AM
    Monday, January 31, 2011 7:03 AM

All replies

  • i think its more of an exchange question as a scom question. SCOM is just the tool to record what you want. However when you not sure what to monitor i suggest to use the performance monitor first, so you can see "real time" what kind of info a counter gives. only when you figured out exactly what you want to monitor, create the rule in SCOM.

    edit: using perfmon for checking SCOM's measurements are correct is a good idea too :).

     


    Rob Korving
    http://jama00.wordpress.com/

    • Proposed as answer by Nicholas Li Monday, January 31, 2011 4:26 AM
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Friday, February 4, 2011 8:54 AM
    Thursday, January 27, 2011 1:18 PM
  •  

    In addition, I would like to share a post which is about targeting rules and monitors with you for your reference:

     

    Targeting Rules and Monitors

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/brianwren/archive/2007/08/22/targeting-rules-and-monitors.aspx

     

    Hope this will give you some hints.


    Nicholas Li - MSFT
    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Friday, February 4, 2011 8:54 AM
    Monday, January 31, 2011 7:03 AM