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chkdsk hangs RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I'm using Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit SP1. I have a 6Tb volume that sits on an external RAID device, connected through a firewire 800 PCI card. Recently Windows has been saying that the volume contains errors and should be checked.

    Every time I run chkdsk, either in the system or at boot time, it just hangs at "Recovering orphaned file..." and sits there. I've let it run for as long as 30 hours and it does not move past this section. Task Manager states that chkdsk is occupying 960Mb of memory.

    Can anyone help? I'd prefer to just take the files away, create a fresh volume, and move them back, but I dont have a place to put so much data temporarily.

    Thanks,
    Mike

    • Moved by Carey FrischMVP Monday, July 25, 2011 9:11 PM Moved to more appropriate forum category (From:Windows 7 Miscellaneous)
    Monday, July 25, 2011 9:07 PM

All replies

  • Hi Mekantor, you said..

    Every time I run chkdsk, either in the system or at boot time, it just hangs at "Recovering orphaned file..." and sits there. I've let it run for as long as 30 hours and it does not move past this section. Task Manager states that chkdsk is occupying 960Mb of memory.

     

    Can you determine what the file is that is orphaned?

    Try 'HELP chkdsk" to get info .. the switches  /I    or   /C   might help as these reduce the amount of checking done.

    There could be other disk checking tools you can use that might circumvent a problem with chkdsk.

     

    Regards, pkn2011


    If my post was helpful - give it a Vote. If it helps solve your problem - propose it as Answer. ;-)
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 12:01 AM
  • The first orphaned file it tries to recover is always the same JPG from a digital camera. I noticed yesterday that no new files are showing up. When I move files to the volume there is no error, but then they arent where they were placed, and the amount of orphaned files grows, so I guess they are there "somewhere" and the index doesnt note them.

    I plugged the storage device into another computer using USB instead of Firewire, and ran chkdsk. It did the same thing, this was a Windows 7 Professional x86 SP1 computer. The storage device does internal drive checking using SMART and bad sector scanning, it reports no hardware problems, but it doesnt support any sort of filesystem checking, which is the issue I seem to be having.

    I just placed an order for a 3TB drive, which combined with some other storage should give me enough space to offload all content from this drive, at which point I will just recreate the volume and probably loose about four thousand of these orphaned files... unless there is a way to actually repair this filesystem.



    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 3:02 PM
  • Hi Mekantor, you said..

    The first orphaned file it tries to recover is always the same JPG from a digital camera. I noticed yesterday that no new files are showing up. When I move files to the volume there is no error, but then they arent where they were placed, and the amount of orphaned files grows, so I guess they are there "somewhere" and the index doesnt note them.

     

    I'm thinking the problem could be the free space on the Drive. Over time it gets filled with old bits and pieces of files and that can get in the way of the data that's actually on the drive. If you can get the data off. Reformat and put it back that'll likely solve it for you outright.

    To maintain a healthy disk here I do a few maintenance type things regularly. First - Delete anything that's unwanted.  (and best to delete in a sitting to avoid fragmentation - rather than delete as you go) 2nd Wipe the FREE space on the drive so that any fragments are zeroed out. Leaving no residual data fragments. And then defragment the drive so as many as possible of the files are contiguous - then Optimize the drive. Optimizing brings everything to the front so that there aren't any spaces between files.

    I used to like the Amiga way of dropping files in contiguous chunks - eg if the file was 10 Meg it'd put it in a 10 Mb chunk, but the PCs filing system will fill the first empty blocks it finds and link to the next empty block and so on, so you could end up with large files in many pieces - and then they need to be put back together before they can be output. If you're deleting files and copying new files and deleting - copying - your HD can end up like a jigsaw. Especially when Deleting really only removes the file header and leaves the actual data on the HD, hopefully to be overwritten by other files thereafter.

    I really can't say what tools Windows would use to do this type of disk management. There's 'disk cleanup' - and 'defrag.exe' I guess. And I'd best not be recommending 3rd party tools when you can now likely resolve your problem with the added storage media available.  

     

    Hope you understand, regards, pkn2011


    If my post was helpful - give it a Vote. If it helps solve your problem - propose it as Answer. ;-)
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 4:08 PM
  • Its a 6Tb volume with 4.7Tb in use, so the issue is not free space. Its a Drobo system, defragging and optimization is handled by it internally, the operating system handles things at the file-system level while the hardware controller handles sector-level management. I dont keep files that arent needed in the first place, this is redundant storage precisely because I dont want to loose anything.

    The NTFS index is corrupted, chkdsk is the utility that fixes it in these situations, but its not working properly. I've seen some solutions for repairing NTFS volumes by mounting them on a Linux OS and using it's tools. I guess that will be my final attempt.

    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 9:30 PM
  • pkn2011, please dont get me wrong, I do appreciate your suggestions. However you seem to be guessing at things, while the problem is already identified and clearly stated. I just want Microsoft to find out why chkdsk might experience such a mode of failure, and hopefully patch it.
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 9:34 PM
  • Hi Mekantor, you said..

    The NTFS index is corrupted, chkdsk is the utility that fixes it in these situations, but its not working properly. I've seen some solutions for repairing NTFS volumes by mounting them on a Linux OS and using it's tools. I guess that will be my final attempt.


    Yes you're right; there's nothing I can do to fix the broken file system, what I've tried to do is help you prevent any further occurrence in the future of a similar problem. By explaining my methodology that has resulted in me only ever seeing 1 bad block on a HD in some 25 years of computing, and on a diversity of platforms.. Tho let's not mention the old floppy disks..

    I avoid auto-defrag and auto-optimize as the rule - the free-space I referred to will only remain zeroed if these kind of things aren't employed otherwise files get moved and fragments remain in the so called free space. If you're employing a sequential loading of files like on a redundant storage drive there really shouldn't be any need for defragging or optimizing. It's only when files are deleted leaving 'free space' that is then filled by the next incoming file that fragmentation occurs.

    Sure with the OS's C:\ drive it's impossible to totally avoid fragmentation as you've got updates - pagefile - MFT - logs that grow and shrink, the HD in this case can more easily be corrupted without a good disk management strategy, but for a storage drive where files aren't being deleted regularly, the need to defragment should be minimized.

    Why chkdsk isn't able to repair your drive I cannot really say, and if it is a problem with Chkdsk itself I hope there is a fix for it too..

    I had a look on the web for Drobo systems - and you're right about the tools available there, So I wish you well in tryng to correct this problem asap.


    Best Regards, pkn2011


    If my post was helpful - give it a Vote. If it helps solve your problem - propose it as Answer. ;-)
    Wednesday, July 27, 2011 5:13 AM