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Outlook over http with same domain name outside and inside RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi folks,

    I have this case where the domain name is the same both internally and external. This is Exchange 2003 and 2003 domain. They need to set up Outlook over RPC.

    They are using the same domain for their website, and also for internal domain name.  They bought another domain name for the external and still want use the old one (which is the logon domain) for the website.

    If you set up the client for servername.olddomain.com and the proxy for mail.newdomain.com it resolves the servername.olddomain.com when you are connected. When out of the office, it find's the olddomain.com but not the server because it's registered and live.

    I can set the internal ip for the server on the servername.olddomain.com .. but then I'm publishing the internal ip to the world, I don't want to do that.

    Is there some way to get around this?

    Thanks in advanced for any help. 

     

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 10:29 PM

Answers

  • On Tue, 1 Nov 2011 22:29:22 +0000, BjarniG wrote:
     
    >
    >
    >Hi folks,
    >
    >I have this case where the domain name is the same both internally and external. This is Exchange 2003 and 2003 domain. They need to set up Outlook over RPC.
    >
    >They are using the same domain for their website, and also for internal domain name. They bought another domain name for the external and still want use the old one (which is the logon domain) for the website.
    >
    >If you set up the client for servername.olddomain.com and the proxy for mail.newdomain.com it resolves the servername.olddomain.com when you are connected. When out of the office, it find's the olddomain.com but not the server because it's registered and live.
    >
    >I can set the internal ip for the server on the servername.olddomain.com .. but then I'm publishing the internal ip to the world, I don't want to do that.
    >
    >Is there some way to get around this?
     
    Sure. Use another DNS server to publish the IP addresses you want to
    be seen on the Internet.
     
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
     

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 2:54 AM

All replies

  • On Tue, 1 Nov 2011 22:29:22 +0000, BjarniG wrote:
     
    >
    >
    >Hi folks,
    >
    >I have this case where the domain name is the same both internally and external. This is Exchange 2003 and 2003 domain. They need to set up Outlook over RPC.
    >
    >They are using the same domain for their website, and also for internal domain name. They bought another domain name for the external and still want use the old one (which is the logon domain) for the website.
    >
    >If you set up the client for servername.olddomain.com and the proxy for mail.newdomain.com it resolves the servername.olddomain.com when you are connected. When out of the office, it find's the olddomain.com but not the server because it's registered and live.
    >
    >I can set the internal ip for the server on the servername.olddomain.com .. but then I'm publishing the internal ip to the world, I don't want to do that.
    >
    >Is there some way to get around this?
     
    Sure. Use another DNS server to publish the IP addresses you want to
    be seen on the Internet.
     
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
     

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 2:54 AM
  • You need to configure Split Horizon DNS http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Split-horizon_DNS

    You have public DNS name servers where you have A records pointing to the public IP addresses internet clients are to resolve.

    You also will configure your internal AD DNS servers configured with A records that point to your internal private IP addresses.

    It is very bad practice to expose your Active Directory DNS zone directly to the internet.

    In your example you will have on your public DNS servers mail.newdomain.com resolve to (for example) 222.222.222.222 (sorry to whoever owns this address)

    On your internal DNS zones you will have the same Host A record mail.newdomain.com resolve to (for example) 10.10.10.10.

    Make sense?


    Clint Boessen MVP - Exchange Server, MCSE, MCITPx4, Dip Network Engineering
    Perth, Western Australia

    Blog: http://clintboessen.blogspot.com/

    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Friday, November 4, 2011 2:37 AM