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Explorer Attributes RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am looking at the Windows Explorer attributes on my Win 7 x64 machine. I know some of them, but can't find any explanation of the others:

    "D" ???

    "P" ???

    "L" ???

    "O" ???

    "I" ?indexed?

    "H" Hidden file

    "R" Read-only file

    "S" System file

    "C" Compressed

    Anyone have any ideas? TIA


    Consume. Conform. Obey.
    Wednesday, February 1, 2012 4:00 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    D  Directories

     

    I  Not content indexed files

     

    O is an extended NTFS attribute. It stands for "Offline".

     

    P  indicates that a file is a reparse point

     

    Hope that helps


    William Tan

    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Arthur Xie Tuesday, February 21, 2012 5:35 AM
    Friday, February 3, 2012 9:31 AM

All replies

  • As far as I know these are the ones u are looking for. Not so sure about the last one but I belive its correct.
    R = READONLY
    H = HIDDEN
    S = SYSTEM
    A = ARCHIVE
    C = COMPRESSED
    N = NOT INDEXED
    O = OFFLINE
    T = TEMPORARY
    E = ENCRYPTED
    L = follows symbolic links.

     

    Note:

    Symbolic links are only available on Windows 2000/XP/2003/Vista/7/2008 systems with the NTFS file system.

    P = 
    puts <tt>/</tt> after directory names.
    I = displays inode numbers along with file names (only on systems that support inode numbers, such as POSIX-compliant and UNIX systems).

    Even Though You Fall, That Flesh Shall Be Made A New!
    Wednesday, February 1, 2012 10:06 PM
  • Thanks; that takes care of "L" and "I".

    "P" I am not getting; where do these mysterious tt/tt numbers show up?

    "D" and "O" are still unresolved.


    Consume. Conform. Obey.
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 8:49 PM
  • Hi,

     

    D  Directories

     

    I  Not content indexed files

     

    O is an extended NTFS attribute. It stands for "Offline".

     

    P  indicates that a file is a reparse point

     

    Hope that helps


    William Tan

    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Arthur Xie Tuesday, February 21, 2012 5:35 AM
    Friday, February 3, 2012 9:31 AM