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BSOD Stop error: (0x0000008e) RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have Windows Vista Ultimate on a Lenovo ThinkPad T61p. Two days ago the screen went blue and showed this error code:

    Stop: 0x0000008E (0xC0000005, 0x822661D7, 0xA5B9A91C, 0x00000000)

    I am able to start the computer in "safe mode with networking", but that's the only way I can get past the login page. Otherwise, if I start Windows normally or in safe mode it loops back to the same blue screen and restarts itself.

    I was able to download and run Spybot search and destroy, and after scanning everything it found a lot of problems. I told it to fix all of the problems, but there were a few errors that it said could not be fixed. I restarted the computer and ran Spybot again. There were less errors found this time, but Spybot still could not fix all of them.

    I have been reading online for two straight days to try to figure out what to do next. PLEASE HELP!

    Thank you!

    Sunday, June 3, 2012 6:29 PM

All replies

  • The Stop 0x0000008E (KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED) indicates that a kernel-mode application generated an exception that the error handler did not catch. The value of the first parameter (0xC0000005, STATUS_ACCESS_VIOLATION) indicates that a memory access violation occurred.

    Upload the DMP file in the \Windows\Minidump folder to your Windows Live SkyDrive, make it publicly accessible and post the URL here, so that we can analyze it and try to understand how you can solve this problem.

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno - Microsoft Community Contributor 2011 Award

    Sunday, June 3, 2012 6:51 PM
  •  These crashes were related to a memory exception (probably a driver).  Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem. 

    *Dont forget to upload any further DMP files (especially those when verifier is running)

    *If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
    In other words STOP!!!   If you dont know what this means you probably arent


    1-Memtest.

    *Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. http://www.memtest.org 

    *Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.

    *Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.

    *Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

    Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.

    If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.



    2-Driver verifier

    Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is.

    *But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver.

    *Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.

    *I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise.

    *Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

    *In Windows 7 you can make a Startup Repair disk by going to Start....All Programs...Maintenance...Create a System Repair Disc - with Windows Vista you'll have to use your installation disk or the "Repair your computer" option at the top of the Safe Mode menu .

    Then, here's the procedure:
    - Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    - Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
    - Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
    *Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
    - Select "Finish" on the next page.

    *Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen.

    *Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation.

    *If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
    *If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.



    *Further Reading
    "http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617"

    Using Driver Verifier to identify issues with Windows drivers for advanced users

    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Sysnative.com Team ZigZag

    Friday, September 28, 2012 3:49 AM
    Moderator
  • With Driver Verifier you just choose Last Known Good if it crashes on boot.

    --
    .
    --
    "ZigZag3143x" wrote in message news:3c9c2b35-f868-45fc-b06d-50ca8c661b57...
     These crashes were related to a memory exception (probably a driver).  Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem. 

    *Dont forget to upload any further DMP files (especially those when verifier is running)

    *If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
    In other words STOP!!!   If you dont know what this means you probably arent


    1-Memtest.

    *Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. http://www.memtest.org 

    *Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.

    *Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.

    *Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

    Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.

    If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.



    2-Driver verifier

    Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is.

    *But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver.

    *Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.

    *I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise.

    *Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

    *In Windows 7 you can make a Startup Repair disk by going to Start....All Programs...Maintenance...Create a System Repair Disc - with Windows Vista you'll have to use your installation disk or the "Repair your computer" option at the top of the Safe Mode menu .

    Then, here's the procedure:
    - Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    - Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
    - Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
    *Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
    - Select "Finish" on the next page.

    *Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen.

    *Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation.

    *If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
    *If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.



    *Further Reading
    "http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617"

    Using Driver Verifier to identify issues with Windows drivers for advanced users

    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Sysnative.com Team ZigZag

    Friday, September 28, 2012 7:45 AM