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  • Question

  • Hi I just did a clean install because I have been getting BSOD. 
    I think I may have ruled out hardware fails, already ran mem check and it passed I am currently running verifier.exe and checking all my non windows drivers. 
    I think it is a driver problem.

    Any help pinpointing which one is it would be appreciated.

    Specs

    4820k   @4.3
    Asus rampage iv
    gtx 770 4gb
    16gb ram

    First I thought it may have been the GPU driver but I couldn't get it to crash I even tried burn tests to see if overloading the gpu could help but the crash seems to be random and not stress related.

    This is my last dump

    ************* Symbol Path validation summary **************
    Response                         Time (ms)     Location
    Deferred                                       SRV*C:\Windows\symbol_cache*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbols
    Symbol search path is: SRV*C:\Windows\symbol_cache*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbols
    Executable search path is: 
    Windows 7 Kernel Version 7601 (Service Pack 1) MP (8 procs) Free x64
    Product: WinNt, suite: TerminalServer SingleUserTS
    Built by: 7601.18247.amd64fre.win7sp1_gdr.130828-1532
    Machine Name:
    Kernel base = 0xfffff800`03463000 PsLoadedModuleList = 0xfffff800`036a66d0
    Debug session time: Fri Jul 18 20:56:57.345 2014 (UTC - 7:00)
    System Uptime: 0 days 1:44:02.046
    Loading Kernel Symbols
    ...............................................................
    ................................................................
    .....................................................
    Loading User Symbols
    PEB is paged out (Peb.Ldr = 000007ff`fffdf018).  Type ".hh dbgerr001" for details
    Loading unloaded module list
    ...........
    *******************************************************************************
    *                                                                             *
    *                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
    *                                                                             *
    *******************************************************************************

    Use !analyze -v to get detailed debugging information.

    BugCheck 50, {fffff88095701003, 0, fffff8000359a437, 5}

    Probably caused by : Pool_Corruption ( nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283 )

    Followup: Pool_corruption
    ---------

    0: kd> !analyze -v
    *******************************************************************************
    *                                                                             *
    *                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
    *                                                                             *
    *******************************************************************************

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50)
    Invalid system memory was referenced.  This cannot be protected by try-except,
    it must be protected by a Probe.  Typically the address is just plain bad or it
    is pointing at freed memory.
    Arguments:
    Arg1: fffff88095701003, memory referenced.
    Arg2: 0000000000000000, value 0 = read operation, 1 = write operation.
    Arg3: fffff8000359a437, If non-zero, the instruction address which referenced the bad memory
    address.
    Arg4: 0000000000000005, (reserved)

    Debugging Details:
    ------------------


    READ_ADDRESS:  fffff88095701003 

    FAULTING_IP: 
    nt!RtlpWalkFrameChain+3a7
    fffff800`0359a437 41f64424030f    test    byte ptr [r12+3],0Fh

    MM_INTERNAL_CODE:  5

    DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID:  WIN7_DRIVER_FAULT

    BUGCHECK_STR:  0x50

    PROCESS_NAME:  svchost.exe

    CURRENT_IRQL:  0

    ANALYSIS_VERSION: 6.3.9600.17029 (debuggers(dbg).140219-1702) amd64fre

    TRAP_FRAME:  fffff880120989e0 -- (.trap 0xfffff880120989e0)
    NOTE: The trap frame does not contain all registers.
    Some register values may be zeroed or incorrect.
    rax=0000000000000000 rbx=0000000000000000 rcx=fffff8800a362806
    rdx=0000000000000001 rsi=0000000000000000 rdi=0000000000000000
    rip=fffff8000359a437 rsp=fffff88012098b70 rbp=fffffa800cad8798
     r8=0000000000000596  r9=fffff8800a33eb64 r10=fffff8800a33eb64
    r11=fffff8800a2f1000 r12=0000000000000000 r13=0000000000000000
    r14=0000000000000000 r15=0000000000000000
    iopl=0         nv up ei ng nz ac pe nc
    nt!RtlpWalkFrameChain+0x3a7:
    fffff800`0359a437 41f64424030f    test    byte ptr [r12+3],0Fh ds:00000000`00000003=??
    Resetting default scope

    LAST_CONTROL_TRANSFER:  from fffff800035555b3 to fffff800034d8bc0

    STACK_TEXT:  
    fffff880`12098878 fffff800`035555b3 : 00000000`00000050 fffff880`95701003 00000000`00000000 fffff880`120989e0 : nt!KeBugCheckEx
    fffff880`12098880 fffff800`034d6cee : 00000000`00000000 fffff880`95701003 fffff800`0370de00 00000000`00000000 : nt! ?? ::FNODOBFM::`string'+0x43801
    fffff880`120989e0 fffff800`0359a437 : 00000000`000063a8 00000000`00000000 fffff880`12098c90 00000000`00071806 : nt!KiPageFault+0x16e
    fffff880`12098b70 fffff800`0359b743 : fffffa80`0cad8798 fffff880`00000011 00000000`00000000 fffff800`00000004 : nt!RtlpWalkFrameChain+0x3a7
    fffff880`12099210 fffff800`0359c5cb : 00000000`00000003 fffffa80`0cad8798 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!RtlWalkFrameChain+0x63
    fffff880`12099240 fffff800`0397213c : fffffa80`0cad8780 00000000`00000040 00000000`00000002 fffff800`035c8911 : nt!RtlCaptureStackBackTrace+0x4b
    fffff880`12099270 fffff800`039741aa : fffff880`12094000 fffff880`1209a000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000001 : nt!IovpLogStackCallout+0x1c
    fffff880`120992a0 fffff800`03976a4a : fffffa80`146484d0 00000000`00000004 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000002 : nt!ViPoolLogStackTrace+0x8a
    fffff880`120992d0 fffff800`0360bc57 : fffffa80`146484c0 00000000`00000040 00000000`00000002 00000000`00000000 : nt!VfFreePoolNotification+0x4a
    fffff880`12099300 fffff880`0a362806 : 00000000`00000002 00000000`00010282 fffff880`120993d8 00000000`00000018 : nt!ExDeferredFreePool+0x1283
    fffff880`120993b0 fffff880`0a36a22e : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 fffff800`0377543a : HTTP!UxpWskReleasePortReservation+0x46
    fffff880`120993e0 fffff880`0a30aed4 : fffff8a0`01f904c0 fffff880`0a344cc5 00000000`00000001 00000000`00010286 : HTTP!UxpWskCloseListenSocket+0xe
    fffff880`12099410 fffff880`0a382348 : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000002 : HTTP!UxpTlCloseListenEndpoint+0x14
    fffff880`12099440 fffff880`0a30af4e : fffffa80`13e97340 fffff8a0`0229d8c0 00000000`00480048 fffff8a0`0b9e435c : HTTP!UxpTlDisassociateListenEndpoints+0x28
    fffff880`12099470 fffff880`0a30b11d : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000001 fffff8a0`022a0db0 fffff980`46b34ee0 : HTTP!UxpTlCloseAddressEndpoint+0xe
    fffff880`120994a0 fffff880`0a30bc12 : fffff8a0`01f904c0 fffff880`0a36e0b5 fffff880`12099500 00000000`0000000f : HTTP!UxTlCloseEndpointRequest+0x3d
    fffff880`120994d0 fffff880`0a382c2e : fffff8a0`01f904c0 fffff8a0`0229d8c0 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000002 : HTTP!UlRemoveSiteFromEndpointList+0x12
    fffff880`12099500 fffff880`0a382e6c : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000002 00000000`00000000 fffff8a0`083e9790 : HTTP!UlpTreeDeleteRegistration+0x5e
    fffff880`12099530 fffff880`0a38374e : fffff980`486d8fc0 fffff8a0`0b9e4340 fffff8a0`022a0db0 00000000`00000000 : HTTP!UlRemoveUrlFromConfigGroup+0x12c
    fffff880`12099620 fffff800`03981d26 : fffff980`46b34ee0 00000000`00000002 fffff980`46b34ee0 fffffa80`0c883598 : HTTP!UlRemoveUrlFromUrlGroupIoctl+0x1ae
    fffff880`12099870 fffff800`037f53a7 : fffffa80`13c0d220 fffff880`12099b60 fffffa80`13c0d220 fffffa80`0dd79200 : nt!IovCallDriver+0x566
    fffff880`120998d0 fffff800`037f5c06 : 00000000`0257e100 00000000`00000498 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!IopXxxControlFile+0x607
    fffff880`12099a00 fffff800`034d7e53 : fffffa80`0da36060 00000000`0257e0c8 fffff880`12099a88 00000000`0012402a : nt!NtDeviceIoControlFile+0x56
    fffff880`12099a70 00000000`778f132a : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!KiSystemServiceCopyEnd+0x13
    00000000`0257e048 00000000`00000000 : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : 0x778f132a


    STACK_COMMAND:  kb

    FOLLOWUP_IP: 
    nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283
    fffff800`0360bc57 90              nop

    SYMBOL_STACK_INDEX:  9

    SYMBOL_NAME:  nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283

    FOLLOWUP_NAME:  Pool_corruption

    IMAGE_NAME:  Pool_Corruption

    DEBUG_FLR_IMAGE_TIMESTAMP:  0

    IMAGE_VERSION:  6.1.7601.18247

    MODULE_NAME: Pool_Corruption

    FAILURE_BUCKET_ID:  X64_0x50_VRF_nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283

    BUCKET_ID:  X64_0x50_VRF_nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283

    ANALYSIS_SOURCE:  KM

    FAILURE_ID_HASH_STRING:  km:x64_0x50_vrf_nt!exdeferredfreepool+1283

    FAILURE_ID_HASH:  {4d4d7fd0-9a9f-d375-f9de-1a828a82e4be}

    Followup: Pool_corruption
    ---------

    0: kd> !analyze -v
    *******************************************************************************
    *                                                                             *
    *                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
    *                                                                             *
    *******************************************************************************

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50)
    Invalid system memory was referenced.  This cannot be protected by try-except,
    it must be protected by a Probe.  Typically the address is just plain bad or it
    is pointing at freed memory.
    Arguments:
    Arg1: fffff88095701003, memory referenced.
    Arg2: 0000000000000000, value 0 = read operation, 1 = write operation.
    Arg3: fffff8000359a437, If non-zero, the instruction address which referenced the bad memory
    address.
    Arg4: 0000000000000005, (reserved)

    Debugging Details:
    ------------------


    READ_ADDRESS:  fffff88095701003 

    FAULTING_IP: 
    nt!RtlpWalkFrameChain+3a7
    fffff800`0359a437 41f64424030f    test    byte ptr [r12+3],0Fh

    MM_INTERNAL_CODE:  5

    DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID:  WIN7_DRIVER_FAULT

    BUGCHECK_STR:  0x50

    PROCESS_NAME:  svchost.exe

    CURRENT_IRQL:  0

    ANALYSIS_VERSION: 6.3.9600.17029 (debuggers(dbg).140219-1702) amd64fre

    TRAP_FRAME:  fffff880120989e0 -- (.trap 0xfffff880120989e0)
    NOTE: The trap frame does not contain all registers.
    Some register values may be zeroed or incorrect.
    rax=0000000000000000 rbx=0000000000000000 rcx=fffff8800a362806
    rdx=0000000000000001 rsi=0000000000000000 rdi=0000000000000000
    rip=fffff8000359a437 rsp=fffff88012098b70 rbp=fffffa800cad8798
     r8=0000000000000596  r9=fffff8800a33eb64 r10=fffff8800a33eb64
    r11=fffff8800a2f1000 r12=0000000000000000 r13=0000000000000000
    r14=0000000000000000 r15=0000000000000000
    iopl=0         nv up ei ng nz ac pe nc
    nt!RtlpWalkFrameChain+0x3a7:
    fffff800`0359a437 41f64424030f    test    byte ptr [r12+3],0Fh ds:00000000`00000003=??
    Resetting default scope

    LAST_CONTROL_TRANSFER:  from fffff800035555b3 to fffff800034d8bc0

    STACK_TEXT:  
    fffff880`12098878 fffff800`035555b3 : 00000000`00000050 fffff880`95701003 00000000`00000000 fffff880`120989e0 : nt!KeBugCheckEx
    fffff880`12098880 fffff800`034d6cee : 00000000`00000000 fffff880`95701003 fffff800`0370de00 00000000`00000000 : nt! ?? ::FNODOBFM::`string'+0x43801
    fffff880`120989e0 fffff800`0359a437 : 00000000`000063a8 00000000`00000000 fffff880`12098c90 00000000`00071806 : nt!KiPageFault+0x16e
    fffff880`12098b70 fffff800`0359b743 : fffffa80`0cad8798 fffff880`00000011 00000000`00000000 fffff800`00000004 : nt!RtlpWalkFrameChain+0x3a7
    fffff880`12099210 fffff800`0359c5cb : 00000000`00000003 fffffa80`0cad8798 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!RtlWalkFrameChain+0x63
    fffff880`12099240 fffff800`0397213c : fffffa80`0cad8780 00000000`00000040 00000000`00000002 fffff800`035c8911 : nt!RtlCaptureStackBackTrace+0x4b
    fffff880`12099270 fffff800`039741aa : fffff880`12094000 fffff880`1209a000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000001 : nt!IovpLogStackCallout+0x1c
    fffff880`120992a0 fffff800`03976a4a : fffffa80`146484d0 00000000`00000004 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000002 : nt!ViPoolLogStackTrace+0x8a
    fffff880`120992d0 fffff800`0360bc57 : fffffa80`146484c0 00000000`00000040 00000000`00000002 00000000`00000000 : nt!VfFreePoolNotification+0x4a
    fffff880`12099300 fffff880`0a362806 : 00000000`00000002 00000000`00010282 fffff880`120993d8 00000000`00000018 : nt!ExDeferredFreePool+0x1283
    fffff880`120993b0 fffff880`0a36a22e : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 fffff800`0377543a : HTTP!UxpWskReleasePortReservation+0x46
    fffff880`120993e0 fffff880`0a30aed4 : fffff8a0`01f904c0 fffff880`0a344cc5 00000000`00000001 00000000`00010286 : HTTP!UxpWskCloseListenSocket+0xe
    fffff880`12099410 fffff880`0a382348 : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000002 : HTTP!UxpTlCloseListenEndpoint+0x14
    fffff880`12099440 fffff880`0a30af4e : fffffa80`13e97340 fffff8a0`0229d8c0 00000000`00480048 fffff8a0`0b9e435c : HTTP!UxpTlDisassociateListenEndpoints+0x28
    fffff880`12099470 fffff880`0a30b11d : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000001 fffff8a0`022a0db0 fffff980`46b34ee0 : HTTP!UxpTlCloseAddressEndpoint+0xe
    fffff880`120994a0 fffff880`0a30bc12 : fffff8a0`01f904c0 fffff880`0a36e0b5 fffff880`12099500 00000000`0000000f : HTTP!UxTlCloseEndpointRequest+0x3d
    fffff880`120994d0 fffff880`0a382c2e : fffff8a0`01f904c0 fffff8a0`0229d8c0 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000002 : HTTP!UlRemoveSiteFromEndpointList+0x12
    fffff880`12099500 fffff880`0a382e6c : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000002 00000000`00000000 fffff8a0`083e9790 : HTTP!UlpTreeDeleteRegistration+0x5e
    fffff880`12099530 fffff880`0a38374e : fffff980`486d8fc0 fffff8a0`0b9e4340 fffff8a0`022a0db0 00000000`00000000 : HTTP!UlRemoveUrlFromConfigGroup+0x12c
    fffff880`12099620 fffff800`03981d26 : fffff980`46b34ee0 00000000`00000002 fffff980`46b34ee0 fffffa80`0c883598 : HTTP!UlRemoveUrlFromUrlGroupIoctl+0x1ae
    fffff880`12099870 fffff800`037f53a7 : fffffa80`13c0d220 fffff880`12099b60 fffffa80`13c0d220 fffffa80`0dd79200 : nt!IovCallDriver+0x566
    fffff880`120998d0 fffff800`037f5c06 : 00000000`0257e100 00000000`00000498 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!IopXxxControlFile+0x607
    fffff880`12099a00 fffff800`034d7e53 : fffffa80`0da36060 00000000`0257e0c8 fffff880`12099a88 00000000`0012402a : nt!NtDeviceIoControlFile+0x56
    fffff880`12099a70 00000000`778f132a : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!KiSystemServiceCopyEnd+0x13
    00000000`0257e048 00000000`00000000 : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : 0x778f132a


    STACK_COMMAND:  kb

    FOLLOWUP_IP: 
    nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283
    fffff800`0360bc57 90              nop

    SYMBOL_STACK_INDEX:  9

    SYMBOL_NAME:  nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283

    FOLLOWUP_NAME:  Pool_corruption

    IMAGE_NAME:  Pool_Corruption

    DEBUG_FLR_IMAGE_TIMESTAMP:  0

    IMAGE_VERSION:  6.1.7601.18247

    MODULE_NAME: Pool_Corruption

    FAILURE_BUCKET_ID:  X64_0x50_VRF_nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283

    BUCKET_ID:  X64_0x50_VRF_nt!ExDeferredFreePool+1283

    ANALYSIS_SOURCE:  KM

    FAILURE_ID_HASH_STRING:  km:x64_0x50_vrf_nt!exdeferredfreepool+1283

    FAILURE_ID_HASH:  {4d4d7fd0-9a9f-d375-f9de-1a828a82e4be}

    Followup: Pool_corruption
    ---------

    Saturday, July 19, 2014 4:24 AM

Answers

  • In order to assist you, we will need the .DMP files to analyze what exactly occurred at the time of the crash, etc. 

    If you don't know where .DMP files are located, here's how to get to them:

    1. Navigate to the %systemroot%\Minidump folder.

    2. Copy any and all DMP files in the Minidump folder to your Desktop and then zip up these files.

    3. Upload the zip containing the .DMP files to Onedrive or a hosting site of your choice and paste in your reply. Prefered sites: Onedrive, Mediafire, Dropbox, etc. Nothing with wait-timers.

    4 (optional): The type of .DMP files located in the Minidump folder are known as Small Memory Dumps. In %systemroot% there will be what is known as a Kernel-Dump (if your system is set to generate). It is labeled MEMORY.DMP. The difference between Small Memory Dumps and Kernel-Dumps in the simplest definition is a Kernel-Dump contains much more information at the time of the crash, therefore allowing further debugging of your issue. If your upload speed permits it, and you aren't going against any strict bandwidth and/or usage caps, etc, the Kernel-Dump is the best choice. Do note that Kernel-Dumps are much larger in size due to containing much more info, which is why I mentioned upload speed, etc.

    If you are going to use Onedrive but don't know how to upload to it, please visit the following:

    Upload photos and files to Onedrive.

    Please note that any "cleaner" programs such as TuneUp Utilities, CCleaner, etc, by default will delete .DMP files upon use.

    If your computer is not generating .DMP files, please do the following:

    1. Start > type %systemroot% which should show the Windows folder, click on it. Once inside that folder, ensure there is a Minidump folder created. If not, CTRL-SHIFT-N to make a New Folder and name it Minidump.

    2. Windows key + Pause key. This should bring up System. Click Advanced System Settings on the left > Advanced > Performance > Settings > Advanced > Ensure there's a check-mark for 'Automatically manage paging file size for all drives'.

    3. Windows key + Pause key. This should bring up System. Click Advanced System Settings on the left > Advanced > Startup and Recovery > Settings > System Failure > ensure there is a check mark next to 'Write an event to the system log'. 

    Ensure Small Memory Dump is selected and ensure the path is %systemroot%\Minidump.

    4. Double check that the WERS is ENABLED:

    Start > Search > type services.msc > Under the name tab, find Windows Error Reporting Service > If the status of the service is not Started then right click it and select Start. Also ensure that under Startup Type it is set to Automatic rather than Manual. You can do this by right clicking it, selecting properties, and under General selecting startup type to 'Automatic', and then click Apply. 

     


    Arnav Sharma | http://arnavsharma.net/ Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

    • Marked as answer by ZigZag3143x Friday, July 25, 2014 9:25 PM
    Saturday, July 19, 2014 12:28 PM
  • We do need the actual log file (called a DMP file) as they contain the only record of the sequence of events leading up to the crash, what drivers were loaded, and what was responsible.  
    We prefer at least 2 DMP files to spot trends and confirm the cause.

    Please follow our instructions for finding and uploading the files we need to help you fix your computer. They can be found here
    If you have any questions about the procedure please ask

    If you are using Blue screen view, who crashed, or a similar application, don't.  They are wrong at least as often as they are correct

    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    • Marked as answer by ZigZag3143x Friday, July 25, 2014 9:25 PM
    Saturday, July 19, 2014 1:33 PM

All replies

  • In order to assist you, we will need the .DMP files to analyze what exactly occurred at the time of the crash, etc. 

    If you don't know where .DMP files are located, here's how to get to them:

    1. Navigate to the %systemroot%\Minidump folder.

    2. Copy any and all DMP files in the Minidump folder to your Desktop and then zip up these files.

    3. Upload the zip containing the .DMP files to Onedrive or a hosting site of your choice and paste in your reply. Prefered sites: Onedrive, Mediafire, Dropbox, etc. Nothing with wait-timers.

    4 (optional): The type of .DMP files located in the Minidump folder are known as Small Memory Dumps. In %systemroot% there will be what is known as a Kernel-Dump (if your system is set to generate). It is labeled MEMORY.DMP. The difference between Small Memory Dumps and Kernel-Dumps in the simplest definition is a Kernel-Dump contains much more information at the time of the crash, therefore allowing further debugging of your issue. If your upload speed permits it, and you aren't going against any strict bandwidth and/or usage caps, etc, the Kernel-Dump is the best choice. Do note that Kernel-Dumps are much larger in size due to containing much more info, which is why I mentioned upload speed, etc.

    If you are going to use Onedrive but don't know how to upload to it, please visit the following:

    Upload photos and files to Onedrive.

    Please note that any "cleaner" programs such as TuneUp Utilities, CCleaner, etc, by default will delete .DMP files upon use.

    If your computer is not generating .DMP files, please do the following:

    1. Start > type %systemroot% which should show the Windows folder, click on it. Once inside that folder, ensure there is a Minidump folder created. If not, CTRL-SHIFT-N to make a New Folder and name it Minidump.

    2. Windows key + Pause key. This should bring up System. Click Advanced System Settings on the left > Advanced > Performance > Settings > Advanced > Ensure there's a check-mark for 'Automatically manage paging file size for all drives'.

    3. Windows key + Pause key. This should bring up System. Click Advanced System Settings on the left > Advanced > Startup and Recovery > Settings > System Failure > ensure there is a check mark next to 'Write an event to the system log'. 

    Ensure Small Memory Dump is selected and ensure the path is %systemroot%\Minidump.

    4. Double check that the WERS is ENABLED:

    Start > Search > type services.msc > Under the name tab, find Windows Error Reporting Service > If the status of the service is not Started then right click it and select Start. Also ensure that under Startup Type it is set to Automatic rather than Manual. You can do this by right clicking it, selecting properties, and under General selecting startup type to 'Automatic', and then click Apply. 

     


    Arnav Sharma | http://arnavsharma.net/ Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

    • Marked as answer by ZigZag3143x Friday, July 25, 2014 9:25 PM
    Saturday, July 19, 2014 12:28 PM
  • We do need the actual log file (called a DMP file) as they contain the only record of the sequence of events leading up to the crash, what drivers were loaded, and what was responsible.  
    We prefer at least 2 DMP files to spot trends and confirm the cause.

    Please follow our instructions for finding and uploading the files we need to help you fix your computer. They can be found here
    If you have any questions about the procedure please ask

    If you are using Blue screen view, who crashed, or a similar application, don't.  They are wrong at least as often as they are correct

    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    • Marked as answer by ZigZag3143x Friday, July 25, 2014 9:25 PM
    Saturday, July 19, 2014 1:33 PM