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Question about Windows Services RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've been trying to cut corners on an XP machine. Since it doesn't need network connectivity, I've disabled networking related services. However, I was wondering if System-level (Start type 0x1) services are safe to disable as well (located under SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services). Specifically, IPSEC, NETBIOS, Tcpip, and TermDD (these are the exact key names).

    I have disabled these services, and didn't have any issues booting. But I haven't done anything beyond that (such as long-term affects/unintended side effects).

    Friday, January 16, 2015 1:07 PM

Answers

  • If you want to disable these for security, you could better upgrade to a supported OS. 

    If you want to disable those for perfomance, you will not have any gain.

    that being said, yes you can safely disable those services if you have no network connectivity requirements.


    MCP/MCSA/MCTS/MCITP

    • Marked as answer by tyler_montney Friday, January 16, 2015 10:05 PM
    Friday, January 16, 2015 2:58 PM

All replies

  • If you want to disable these for security, you could better upgrade to a supported OS. 

    If you want to disable those for perfomance, you will not have any gain.

    that being said, yes you can safely disable those services if you have no network connectivity requirements.


    MCP/MCSA/MCTS/MCITP

    • Marked as answer by tyler_montney Friday, January 16, 2015 10:05 PM
    Friday, January 16, 2015 2:58 PM
  • If you want to disable these for security, you could better upgrade to a supported OS. 

    If you want to disable those for perfomance, you will not have any gain.

    that being said, yes you can safely disable those services if you have no network connectivity requirements.


    MCP/MCSA/MCTS/MCITP

    Do remember that some of us have programs that only work on XP. I still need to run XP, but why run more services than you need to?
    Friday, January 16, 2015 10:05 PM
  • to be honest, I've not met the first program that ran on XP but not on 7, with needed compatibility configurations. For 16 bit applications you might need to install and run the 32 bit version of the OS (and start looking for replacement software!).

    It's true running unneeded stuff is not optimal, but I would like to return your question; why disable functionality if unsure what it does or what the impact might be? If something does not work as expected in a few months, will you be happy to find out it's due some obscure dependency on one of those services?


    MCP/MCSA/MCTS/MCITP

    Monday, January 19, 2015 8:52 AM