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MOSS with AAM and multiple urls RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello All

    Can you please throw some light on setting up multiple urls for our new site in MOSS 2007.

    Is it necessary to extend it to a new zone every time we want to create a new URL for the same site or is it ok to just configure it on iis level? Is that right that extending it to a new zone every time for new URL will end up with more work for SharePoint servers?  If this is best practice can you explain why is that ?

    Thanks in advance.

    Monday, September 26, 2011 2:29 PM

Answers

  • I haven't personally set it up but I know there are some proxying options as well, where you could setup a proxy to your SharePoint server if you prefer to have a URL maintained. This is in my opinion is not a very elegant solution to implement internally though (I think it's more typically used when proxying SharePoint through a DMZ), and unless there is a strong business requirement for persistent URLs I think the added complexity in terms of maintainability isn't worth the added benefit of persistent URLs. A business requirement I could forsee is links from an outside site, or perhaps within documents that already exist if you are perhaps replacing multiple sites with one site, I've run into problems like this in the past.

    If all you want is vanity URLs I do not see any problems with creating IIS redirects, what I was advising against was setting up additional host headers on an IIS site managed by SharrePoint without "extending" the site through SharePoint. I do not see IIS redirects as a violation as best practices as long as you document that they exist, and ensure they are maintained. If you have multiple WFE's and you want the redirects to be highly available you will need your load balacing solution (NLB, for exmaple) to be aware of the DNS names your using for redirect and set up the redirects manually on each WFE participating.

    If you do not forsee more than 5 URLs being necessary, then honestly I would extend and use AAMs so the URLs aren't rewritten by SharePoint upon redirect.

    • Proposed as answer by _Keith_ Wednesday, September 28, 2011 5:15 PM
    • Marked as answer by UMAR_USNT Thursday, September 29, 2011 2:21 AM
    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 3:25 PM

All replies

  • Hello,

    If you only edit IIS you will run into problems, because when SharePoint receives HTTP requests for an IIS site where SharePoint is hosted, IIS receives the connection and then once it reaches SharePoint the request is compared to the AAM's and if there is no AAM for the hostheader identified by the HTTP request, I've found SharePoint most often re-writes the hostheader to be somehting it expects in it's AAM's.

    I believe the best way to do this would be to extend every time you want to add a URL. You can add it to IIS, and then add it to your AAMs if you prefer; just remember, anything you do to IIS manually won't be replicated across your WFE's.

    Here is a good description of AAM's courtesy of Technet:
    "Each Web application can be associated with a collection of mappings between internal and public URLs. Both internal and public URLs consist of the protocol and domain portion of the full URL (for example, https://www.fabrikam.com). A public URL is what users type to get to the SharePoint site, and that URL is what appears in the links on the pages. Internal URLs are in the URL requests that are sent to the SharePoint site. Many internal URLs can be associated with a single public URL in multi-server farms (for example, when a load balancer routes requests to specific IP addresses to various servers in the load-balancing cluster).

    Each Web application supports five collections of mappings per URL; the five collections correspond to five zones (default, intranet, extranet, Internet, and custom). When the Web application receives a request for an internal URL in a particular zone, links on the pages returned to the user have the public URL for that zone. For more information, see Plan alternate access mappings (Windows SharePoint Services)."

    Taken from:(http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc288173(office.12).aspx)

    More good reading on understanding AAMs:
    http://blog.thekid.me.uk/archive/2007/03/16/alternate-access-mapping-aam-with-sharepoint.aspx

    Monday, September 26, 2011 8:28 PM
  • Keith

    Thanks for the detailed reply really helpful . I read that rechet article . What will be the solution in case I want to use more than 5 URLs for one site ( you can extend web app only up to five zones)  . lets  say we might end up with 50 for some business reason . e.g. its the same site but each department want to access it with there own url , is there a way to achive this goal. Thanks again !

    Monday, September 26, 2011 10:12 PM
  • Hi,

     

    From your requirement, you can use host-named site collections to resolve your issue.

     

    Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 supports both path-based and host-named site collections. The primary difference between path-based and host-named site collections is that all path-based site collections in a Web application share the same host name (DNS name), and each host-named site collection in a Web application is assigned a unique DNS name.

     

    Host-named site collections provide a scalable Web hosting solution with each site collection assigned to a unique DNS name. In a Web hosting deployment, each host-named site collection has its own vanity host name URL, such as http://customer1.contoso.com, http://customer2.contoso.com, or http://www.customer3.com.

     

    For more information about creating a host-named site collection, check out the following article:

     

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc424952.aspx

     

    Thanks,

    Rock Wang

    Forum Support

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.


    Regards, Rock Wang Microsoft Online Community Support
    Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:47 AM
  • Rock Wang,

    This would mean he uses the same web application to host multiple site collections, this wouldn't mean you could create more vanity URL's for the same site collection, correct?

    UMAR,

    If your only goal is to have vanity URLs I.E. Each department accesses the same site - maybe your time entry portal or something? - using a differnt url; for example HR types http://HRTIME, Accounting enters http://ACTIME and BOTH goto the same site, then if you weren't concerned if the ultimate URL was always the same, you could just set up redirects from IIS to this site, no? So setup DNS, and a redirect in IIS for each of the sites on the SharePoint box that directs a variety of host headers to one URL, this is just your standard IIS redirect.

    Is it a requirement to have the URL remain as the vanity URL while accessing the site?

    Tuesday, September 27, 2011 10:10 PM
  • Keith

    yes you are right . i agree with you.

    I have one site collection (root level ) in this web app . Now i want this to be accessible using http://abc.com , http://lmn.com and also http://xyz.com ( and it should show http://abc.com in explorer when you use this url to access the site ). I know its easy to create DNS enteries and redirect in IIS . But according to the article the one you send me earlier it is recomended not to do that ( correct me if i am wrong) . every time you want to access site using a different url use AAM and extend web app to that URL.

    I am trying to understand from you experts that following the best practice which option is right way to do this ? thanks for your input it was really helpful  .

    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 2:46 AM
  • Hi,

    Yes, that would mean he uses the same web application to host multiple site collections.

    Since each web application can only have five zone at the most, I suggest that you can use Keith's solution as a workaround.

    Thanks,

    Rock Wang

    Forum Support

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.



    Regards, Rock Wang Microsoft Online Community Support
    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 8:43 AM
  • I haven't personally set it up but I know there are some proxying options as well, where you could setup a proxy to your SharePoint server if you prefer to have a URL maintained. This is in my opinion is not a very elegant solution to implement internally though (I think it's more typically used when proxying SharePoint through a DMZ), and unless there is a strong business requirement for persistent URLs I think the added complexity in terms of maintainability isn't worth the added benefit of persistent URLs. A business requirement I could forsee is links from an outside site, or perhaps within documents that already exist if you are perhaps replacing multiple sites with one site, I've run into problems like this in the past.

    If all you want is vanity URLs I do not see any problems with creating IIS redirects, what I was advising against was setting up additional host headers on an IIS site managed by SharrePoint without "extending" the site through SharePoint. I do not see IIS redirects as a violation as best practices as long as you document that they exist, and ensure they are maintained. If you have multiple WFE's and you want the redirects to be highly available you will need your load balacing solution (NLB, for exmaple) to be aware of the DNS names your using for redirect and set up the redirects manually on each WFE participating.

    If you do not forsee more than 5 URLs being necessary, then honestly I would extend and use AAMs so the URLs aren't rewritten by SharePoint upon redirect.

    • Proposed as answer by _Keith_ Wednesday, September 28, 2011 5:15 PM
    • Marked as answer by UMAR_USNT Thursday, September 29, 2011 2:21 AM
    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 3:25 PM