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What is the best strategy for opening the FailedFilesLog.txt ? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi

    Please could you help? I'm struggling to following the below recommended action:

    DPM Error Message: Review the failure errors for individual files from the log file \\?\Volume{a28a8ab1-e130-11e5-8a3a-a0b3ccebedff}\8712f603-812f-45be-9ab7-82052c62d31b\FailedFilesLog.txt and take appropriate action. If some files fail consistently, you can exclude the folders containing these files by modifying the protection group or moving the files to another location.

    Whatever I try I cannot access this file, I have tried all of the following:

    • Mounting the volume and navigating to the file in the command prompt
    • Deleting all reference to the protected area and starting again
    • Disabling the associated DPM service and then trying to access the inaccessible folder

    Thanks for your time

    Mark

    Friday, April 8, 2016 3:17 PM

Answers

  • Hi Mark,

    The strategy I found most useful for retreivening and opening the FailedFilesLog.txt is to use the Sysinternals tools called PSExec to run a CMD-promt as NT AUTHORITY\System(which have access to the DPM-volumes).

    1. Download the PSExec-tool that is part of Sysinternals PsTools.
      PsTools Download
    2. Open an elevated CMD-promt and navigate to the folder where you downloaded the PsTools.
    3. Run the following line to start a CMD-promt as System:
      PSEXEC -i -s -d CMD  
      (to verify that you really are running as System, type in whoami after running the first command)
    4. Mount your DPM volume by using the following line(in this example I use T as drive letter):
      mountvol t: \\?\Volume{a28a8ab1-e130-11e5-8a3a-a0b3ccebedff}

    5. Type in the following line to navigate to the folder containing the FailedFilesLog.txt:
      cd 
      8712f603-812f-45be-9ab7-82052c62d31b
    6. Copy the FailedFilesLog.txt-file to C:\Temp by using the following command:
      copy FailedFilesLog.txt C:\Temp
    7. Open the FailedFilesLog.txt with Notepad or your application of choice.
    8. Remember to dismount the DPM-volume when you are done by using the following command:
      mountvol t: -d

    Hopefully you find this strategy as useful as I do!

    Kind Regards
    Markus Eliasson

    • Marked as answer by MR43 Monday, April 11, 2016 1:05 PM
    Friday, April 8, 2016 9:18 PM

All replies

  • Hi Mark,

    The strategy I found most useful for retreivening and opening the FailedFilesLog.txt is to use the Sysinternals tools called PSExec to run a CMD-promt as NT AUTHORITY\System(which have access to the DPM-volumes).

    1. Download the PSExec-tool that is part of Sysinternals PsTools.
      PsTools Download
    2. Open an elevated CMD-promt and navigate to the folder where you downloaded the PsTools.
    3. Run the following line to start a CMD-promt as System:
      PSEXEC -i -s -d CMD  
      (to verify that you really are running as System, type in whoami after running the first command)
    4. Mount your DPM volume by using the following line(in this example I use T as drive letter):
      mountvol t: \\?\Volume{a28a8ab1-e130-11e5-8a3a-a0b3ccebedff}

    5. Type in the following line to navigate to the folder containing the FailedFilesLog.txt:
      cd 
      8712f603-812f-45be-9ab7-82052c62d31b
    6. Copy the FailedFilesLog.txt-file to C:\Temp by using the following command:
      copy FailedFilesLog.txt C:\Temp
    7. Open the FailedFilesLog.txt with Notepad or your application of choice.
    8. Remember to dismount the DPM-volume when you are done by using the following command:
      mountvol t: -d

    Hopefully you find this strategy as useful as I do!

    Kind Regards
    Markus Eliasson

    • Marked as answer by MR43 Monday, April 11, 2016 1:05 PM
    Friday, April 8, 2016 9:18 PM
  • Huge thanks for this, Markus.

    Your steps worked for me up until step 5 where I discovered that I could not navigate to the quoted folder. What I could do however is use the dir command to confirm the presence and location of the FailedFilesLog.txt file which allowed me to view and output the contents of the file:

    type t:\8712f603-812f-45be-9ab7-82052c62d31b\FailedFilesLog.txt > c:\failed.log

    notepad failed.log

    I'm really pleased, thank you again.

    Mark


    Monday, April 11, 2016 1:05 PM