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Bounce back message rule for exchange server RRS feed

  • Question

  • so our company have two accepted email domain: abc.com and xyz.com

    we would like to discontinue xyz.com by the end of the year, and we want people that send emails  to @xyz.com will get a bounce back message, like " @xyz.com is no longer in used, please use @abc.com instead".  and at the same time, the message should go through to our users' mailboxes.

    So we want message delivered and a bounce back to senders.

    we are using exchange 2007, but i tried the following on Transport rule, it didn't work

    Wednesday, December 11, 2013 8:45 PM

Answers

  • That rule should work, but the message won't be delivered since the action is to send a NDR. It wouldn't make sense to send a Non-Delivery Report and then deliver the message!


    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE&I, Exchange MVP

    Thursday, December 12, 2013 3:49 AM
  • On such short notice you could try the auto-respond style of rule on each user's machine. Just keep an eye out for mail loops, although I'm pretty sure your users will start yelling if one starts. To end the cycle, disable the auto-responder rule on that person's machine -- and be sure to *remove* those rules after a set amount of time has elapsed. Don't let them remain forever.


    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE&I, Exchange MVP

    Friday, December 13, 2013 10:11 PM

All replies

  • That rule should work, but the message won't be delivered since the action is to send a NDR. It wouldn't make sense to send a Non-Delivery Report and then deliver the message!


    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE&I, Exchange MVP

    Thursday, December 12, 2013 3:49 AM
  • If we just want to send the message. how can we make sure the senders get it?
    Thursday, December 12, 2013 4:11 PM
  • There really isn't any _good_ way to do that. If you try using an Inbox Rule you run the risk of creating an e-mail loop -- and you won't be happy if you do! What if someone that sends YOU and e-mail also has an auto-responded running on their mailbox?

    Why would you want to have such a short (two or three weeks) period of adjustment? The domain registration can't be that expensive.

    If you've changed your Internet presence and correspondence (web pages, advertising, letterhead, business cards, etc.), keep the domain for a whole and besides sending e-mail to your business partners, make sure your employees are informing their correspondents of the address change. After a suitably long period, just go ahead and put that transport rule into play and leave it running for a couple of months. After that, remove the secondary SMTP proxy addresses from your mailboxes, distribution groups, etc. and remove the MX record from DNS. Wait another week or so (depending on the TTL you had on your external DNS records) and then remove the old domain from your "accepted domains" and nuke the transport rule.

    I've been through a few mergers and acquisitions over the years I've been an e-mail admin (Wang, Getronics, Paradigms, PinkRoccade, RedSiren, etc.) and never had to resort to using NDRs or auto-responders to get out the message that the old domain won't work after <pick-your-date> -- provided the date is far enough in the future.


    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE&I, Exchange MVP

    Thursday, December 12, 2013 10:33 PM
  • Thanks for your reply. the secondary domain is one of brand name and it's a business decision to discontinue it. and we want all our customer know that we are changing it to another email domain, so we needs a bounce back email.

    Friday, December 13, 2013 5:55 PM
  • On such short notice you could try the auto-respond style of rule on each user's machine. Just keep an eye out for mail loops, although I'm pretty sure your users will start yelling if one starts. To end the cycle, disable the auto-responder rule on that person's machine -- and be sure to *remove* those rules after a set amount of time has elapsed. Don't let them remain forever.


    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE&I, Exchange MVP

    Friday, December 13, 2013 10:11 PM