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Linked Excel worksheet in a Word 2010 document RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a linked Excel worksheet in my Word 2010 document.  I know how to break the link, but I would like to know what the COVERT option is/does
    Wednesday, November 7, 2012 12:17 AM

Answers

  • It's not applicable to linked worksheet objects. It may be for other linked objects. For unlinked worksheet objects, you get a number of format options.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    • Marked as answer by Jaynet Zhang Wednesday, November 28, 2012 9:54 AM
    Wednesday, November 7, 2012 5:03 AM
  • "Convert..." is there to let you change the "Class" of OLE objects such as embedded worksheets. OLE is short for "Object Linking and Embedding".

    What is the "Class" ? It's what tells Word/OLE which piece of software (the "server") to use to work with the object (e.g. to update its display when needed, or to edit the object). Each Class has a name For example, "Excel.Sheet.8" is, roughly speaking, the name for Excel sheets in 97-2003 .xls format. "Excel.Sheet.12" is the name for Excel 2007/2010 .xlsx format. There are other Classes and names for Macro-enabled worksheets, Open Document format sheets, and other types of object that Excel can work with. In principle, changing the class could mean that the object's server is a completely different program, but mostly, it's likely to be the same program or a different version of the same program. Even when the same server is used for different classes, the server or the container may behave differently depending on the class - e.g. the object may look different, or features might be enabled for one Class and not another.

    Broadly speaking I would say that there are few circumstances in which you should need to use this function in a modern Office system - the most likely situation is where you are working with someone else, you need to use a certain type of embedded object, you each have a different version of the object's server, and the older version doesn't recognise the newer one. 


    Peter Jamieson

    • Marked as answer by Jaynet Zhang Wednesday, November 28, 2012 9:54 AM
    Saturday, November 10, 2012 5:22 PM

All replies

  • It's not applicable to linked worksheet objects. It may be for other linked objects. For unlinked worksheet objects, you get a number of format options.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    • Marked as answer by Jaynet Zhang Wednesday, November 28, 2012 9:54 AM
    Wednesday, November 7, 2012 5:03 AM
  • "Convert..." is there to let you change the "Class" of OLE objects such as embedded worksheets. OLE is short for "Object Linking and Embedding".

    What is the "Class" ? It's what tells Word/OLE which piece of software (the "server") to use to work with the object (e.g. to update its display when needed, or to edit the object). Each Class has a name For example, "Excel.Sheet.8" is, roughly speaking, the name for Excel sheets in 97-2003 .xls format. "Excel.Sheet.12" is the name for Excel 2007/2010 .xlsx format. There are other Classes and names for Macro-enabled worksheets, Open Document format sheets, and other types of object that Excel can work with. In principle, changing the class could mean that the object's server is a completely different program, but mostly, it's likely to be the same program or a different version of the same program. Even when the same server is used for different classes, the server or the container may behave differently depending on the class - e.g. the object may look different, or features might be enabled for one Class and not another.

    Broadly speaking I would say that there are few circumstances in which you should need to use this function in a modern Office system - the most likely situation is where you are working with someone else, you need to use a certain type of embedded object, you each have a different version of the object's server, and the older version doesn't recognise the newer one. 


    Peter Jamieson

    • Marked as answer by Jaynet Zhang Wednesday, November 28, 2012 9:54 AM
    Saturday, November 10, 2012 5:22 PM