none
SIMPLE QUESTION: Do I really need to test all my applications to upggrade IE8 to IE11? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I was wondering if someone can give some practical advise on the best approach upgrading IE8 to IE11 in large organization.

    Scenario: large organization with lots and lots Windows 7 computers running IE8. Why? Well, did I mention it is large organization? What? Why again? Well, Large organization means large number of applications including large number of custom in-house written Web applications that somebody said "may not work in IE11". I hope you get the idea.

    Objective: since IE8 is not a good browser (just to say politely it is bit outdated :-) organization would like to upgrade to IE11 with minimal amount of risk, friction, efforts, time, testing etc. Bottom line: minimum amount of RESOURCES which usually means minimum amount of money. Yes, it looks like it is all about money :-).

    Challenge: as always somebody said: we have tons of applications that may not work in IE11 and we need to test them all. If somebody say "no worries IE11 is fully compatible with IE8 so everything will work" and then one (or more) APPS won't work in IE11 this person will be in trouble. So what is usually happens this person who may say "don't worry" just because nobody want to get into trouble will say "sure, let's test all applications". Just not to take responsibility if at the end of the day one application won't work for any reason (even if the true reason why application won't work is not because of IE11 compatibility issue but something else). So now we are talking about doing what they call "full regression test" meaning we spend time, resources, and at the end of the day money.

    And when all the testing is done, most likely it will be no issues. But I cannot say for sure. I just cannot understand how something that works in IE8 won't work in IE11. I do understand that many things that works in IE11 won't work in IE8 - for example HTML5, SPDY protocol etc. And that's fine - we are not looking to downgrade IE11 to IE8. We need otherwise - upgrade IE8 to IE11. So I don't get why or how it may not work if IE11 is better, faster, more secure etc.

    Yes, I do understand that sometimes new security features are causing some issues when first introduced, but 1. they will eventually be addressed and 2. they can easily be switched to lower level compatible with older browser (as temporary solution) just to make things work. But is that really true that many applications that works in IE8 will not work in IE11?

    I see a fundamental issue here. We need to move forward faster and faster (Edge is now reality and IE already history) but somebody say it does not work. So where is this magic potion that allows to move forward and not to stay behind? It must be something, and if not maybe somebody should look and address (read:resolve) this fundamental issue.

    Anyway please let me know what you think. If somebody (and I'm sure somebody went through the same hassle) got real experience and can share some ideas it will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!

    Thursday, May 7, 2015 8:02 PM

Answers

  • Anyway please let me know what you think. If somebody (and I'm sure somebody went through the same hassle) got real experience and can share some ideas it will be greatly appreciated.

    No, you don't need to test everything.

    Chris Jackson has written about this lots of times, I recommend that you read his blogs, and you will understand why your current thinking is incomplete. Chris also analyses and discusses "the wrong way to approach application compatibility testing" and offers great thoughts on "a better way"

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/cjacks/

    * consider that every website is really an application* (sometimes many applications on a single website)

    You can always take the approach of "deploy a new browser and see what happens", this is a valid, although risky, approach.
    We never test everything in our very large enterprise. We test the primary/critical apps. We have "early-adopter groups" who discover other issues and report back to us. we fix those things. some things go undiscovered for a long time. some things which are discovered are never fixed.


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    Thursday, May 7, 2015 9:38 PM
  • Hi Lync15 ,

    I agree with DonPick .Upgrading to the latest Internet Explorer version may cause the compatibility issue but it is worthy.There are many improvements in the Internet Explorer such as the "Enterprise Mode","Enhanced Mode" and so on.
    Here is a link for reference:
    Internet Explorer 11 - FAQ for IT Pros
    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn268945.aspx

    We can`t guarantee all the apps can work well but we can test the most important apps to ensure they can work correctly.
    Usually the higher version will be compatible with the lower version.If there is something wrong with the higher version ,we can try the "Compatibility View  settings" and try to use "F12" tool to choose the "Emulation"mode for the website.

    Best regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Friday, May 8, 2015 8:34 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Yes you do need to test all the Web Applications.

    Nosh Mernacaj, Identity Management Specialist


    Thursday, May 7, 2015 8:04 PM
  • Anyway please let me know what you think. If somebody (and I'm sure somebody went through the same hassle) got real experience and can share some ideas it will be greatly appreciated.

    No, you don't need to test everything.

    Chris Jackson has written about this lots of times, I recommend that you read his blogs, and you will understand why your current thinking is incomplete. Chris also analyses and discusses "the wrong way to approach application compatibility testing" and offers great thoughts on "a better way"

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/cjacks/

    * consider that every website is really an application* (sometimes many applications on a single website)

    You can always take the approach of "deploy a new browser and see what happens", this is a valid, although risky, approach.
    We never test everything in our very large enterprise. We test the primary/critical apps. We have "early-adopter groups" who discover other issues and report back to us. we fix those things. some things go undiscovered for a long time. some things which are discovered are never fixed.


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    Thursday, May 7, 2015 9:38 PM
  • Hi Lync15 ,

    I agree with DonPick .Upgrading to the latest Internet Explorer version may cause the compatibility issue but it is worthy.There are many improvements in the Internet Explorer such as the "Enterprise Mode","Enhanced Mode" and so on.
    Here is a link for reference:
    Internet Explorer 11 - FAQ for IT Pros
    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn268945.aspx

    We can`t guarantee all the apps can work well but we can test the most important apps to ensure they can work correctly.
    Usually the higher version will be compatible with the lower version.If there is something wrong with the higher version ,we can try the "Compatibility View  settings" and try to use "F12" tool to choose the "Emulation"mode for the website.

    Best regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Friday, May 8, 2015 8:34 AM
    Moderator