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Server with Quickbook RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hey everyone,

    I have been paying for a service for 2 years now and was thinking its time to have my own server due to cost in the long run.  The way it works now is I have 4 computers that remote desktop onto a 2008 server and have my own desktop with QuickBooks premiere on it.

    My question now is what software would I need to use to make this happen.  I'm just looking into the software side not hardware yet.  I was thinking Windows Server 2012 but there are so many versions I have no clue what one is correct.  I see VM, TS and RDS are ways to go but what one would be the best way.  Any Advice would be great..

    Thanks in Advance

    Ralph

    Monday, January 12, 2015 1:20 PM

Answers

  • Hi Ralph,

    After going through your scenario here is what you can think of.

    As you have 4-5 users to remotely access the software\server, you can go for server 2012 or server 2012 r2 with 5 User CAL (Personally suggest for server 2012 R2 for lot of extra advanced features). 

    After that install the Server, join the server and other client computer in domain. Install Remote Desktop Service role (until server 2008 called “Terminal Service”); install RD Connection Broker, RD Session Host, RD Web Access {if want to use RemoteApp feature} and RD Licensing role. Activate the RD License server and install purchased RDS CAL {for remote access we need “Windows Server CAL + RDS CAL}. Install the required “Quickbook” software on it and ready to go.

    Now it’s up to you whether you want to provide RDP access or RemoteApp access to your users, and according to that you can define your strategy.

    For Hardware part and for your cost effectiveness, you can need to have one server install Server 2012\R2 on it with Hyper-v role and then create 2 VM (1st as AD DS and 2nd as RDS).

    You can get more guide from below link.
    Remote Desktop Services Overview
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-in/library/hh831447.aspx

    Step by Step Windows 2012 R2 Remote Desktop Services – Part 1 (4 Part series very helpful)

    Hope it helps!

    Thanks.

    Dharmesh Solanki

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, January 13, 2015 3:18 AM
  • Hi Ralph,

    On the physical server you would install Server 2012 R2 Standard, then Hyper-V.  Next you would create 2 VMs, and install Server 2012 R2 Standard inside of each.  The first VM you would make a domain controller and the second VM you would create an RDS deployment using Server Manager -- Manage -- Add Roles and Features -- RDS Install -- Quick/Standard -- Session-based -- etc.  Once the RDS deployment is created you would configure certificates, configure settings, install and publish QuickBooks, etc.

    The Server 2012/2012 R2 Standard license allows you to have it installed on the physical server with only Hyper-V, plus installed on 2 VMs on the same server.

    -TP


    Thursday, January 15, 2015 9:29 PM
  • Hi,

    Using VMs allows better hardware utilization, more flexibility, ability to move workloads easily, etc.  If possible you want to separate major components to reduce conflicts and allow you to potentially update without affecting other pieces.  For example, you may need to update or take down your RDS servers without affecting your domain controllers.

    What is considered really hard is subjective.  If you pick things up pretty fast and are willing to put the time in via trial and error I see no reason why you cannot learn it on your own.

    -TP

    • Marked as answer by RM 2014 Saturday, January 17, 2015 11:51 AM
    Friday, January 16, 2015 5:31 PM
  • Hi,

    I suggest you weigh the cost of purchasing hardware, Windows Server license, Windows Server CALs, RDS CALs, etc., versus the cost of a VM in Azure, Amazon, or other provider + RDS CALs.  With automation you could have the VM available for say, 12 hours per day, 6 days per week, and shut down the rest of the time.  This could keep the ongoing cost well under $100/month, especially if you get a discounted price.

    Also I suggest you weigh all of the time required to set things up yourself versus paying an expert to get it all running properly up on Azure or other provider in a matter of hours.  If you do it yourself you will learn a lot, which is a strong benefit.

    If your only purpose for the server is to run QuickBooks, then it may be overkill to purchase your own quality Dell server with redundant hard drives, power supply, etc.

    On the other hand, having a powerful Dell server sitting in your office is a great option.  All depends on your specific needs.

    -TP

    • Marked as answer by RM 2014 Saturday, January 17, 2015 11:51 AM
    Friday, January 16, 2015 6:27 PM

All replies

  • Hi Ralph,

    After going through your scenario here is what you can think of.

    As you have 4-5 users to remotely access the software\server, you can go for server 2012 or server 2012 r2 with 5 User CAL (Personally suggest for server 2012 R2 for lot of extra advanced features). 

    After that install the Server, join the server and other client computer in domain. Install Remote Desktop Service role (until server 2008 called “Terminal Service”); install RD Connection Broker, RD Session Host, RD Web Access {if want to use RemoteApp feature} and RD Licensing role. Activate the RD License server and install purchased RDS CAL {for remote access we need “Windows Server CAL + RDS CAL}. Install the required “Quickbook” software on it and ready to go.

    Now it’s up to you whether you want to provide RDP access or RemoteApp access to your users, and according to that you can define your strategy.

    For Hardware part and for your cost effectiveness, you can need to have one server install Server 2012\R2 on it with Hyper-v role and then create 2 VM (1st as AD DS and 2nd as RDS).

    You can get more guide from below link.
    Remote Desktop Services Overview
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-in/library/hh831447.aspx

    Step by Step Windows 2012 R2 Remote Desktop Services – Part 1 (4 Part series very helpful)

    Hope it helps!

    Thanks.

    Dharmesh Solanki

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, January 13, 2015 3:18 AM
  • Thanks for some info.  i'm so green at this I think I might have to hire someone to set this up to start.  I have 2012 installed on a computer to test but so lost when it comes to "you can need to have one server install Server 2012\R2 on it with Hyper-v role and then create 2 VM (1st as AD DS and 2nd as RDS)."

    Thanks for the help

    Thursday, January 15, 2015 1:49 PM
  • Lets see here.  If I have the server and windows server 2012 installed on it.  Do I create 2 VM's.  Do I need to install sever 2012 on each machine?  This is where I'm getting lost at.  I thought when you create a VM you need to install a OS on each.  If this is so, do I need to buy multiple copies of 2012?

    Any input would be great.  Sorry for all the Noob questions.

     
    Thursday, January 15, 2015 9:07 PM
  • Hi Ralph,

    On the physical server you would install Server 2012 R2 Standard, then Hyper-V.  Next you would create 2 VMs, and install Server 2012 R2 Standard inside of each.  The first VM you would make a domain controller and the second VM you would create an RDS deployment using Server Manager -- Manage -- Add Roles and Features -- RDS Install -- Quick/Standard -- Session-based -- etc.  Once the RDS deployment is created you would configure certificates, configure settings, install and publish QuickBooks, etc.

    The Server 2012/2012 R2 Standard license allows you to have it installed on the physical server with only Hyper-V, plus installed on 2 VMs on the same server.

    -TP


    Thursday, January 15, 2015 9:29 PM
  • Thanks!!!

    Now I understand that part

    Is there a reason why we create VM's and separate the services instead?

    I'm really enjoying all the learning with this.  There is just allot to learn on it.  I think my next problem will be learning the Remote side.  Is it really hard to do or can it be done by someone that picks up things pretty fast?

    Thanks Again for your help..


    Friday, January 16, 2015 3:08 PM
  • Hi,

    Using VMs allows better hardware utilization, more flexibility, ability to move workloads easily, etc.  If possible you want to separate major components to reduce conflicts and allow you to potentially update without affecting other pieces.  For example, you may need to update or take down your RDS servers without affecting your domain controllers.

    What is considered really hard is subjective.  If you pick things up pretty fast and are willing to put the time in via trial and error I see no reason why you cannot learn it on your own.

    -TP

    • Marked as answer by RM 2014 Saturday, January 17, 2015 11:51 AM
    Friday, January 16, 2015 5:31 PM
  • I think I pick things up pretty fast :).   I called dell and I think the server (Hardware) Is way more then I need.  64GB Ram 4TB hard Drive space, Intel Xeon E5-2430L 2.00GHz, 15M Cache, 7.2GT/s QPI, Turbo, 6C, 60W.  All its gonna be for is to log in and use Quickbooks.  This seems to be the only way everybody will have access to the multi user file.  The users who remote in won't need access to the internet from the server just Quickbooks and a folder to share.  I am running 2012 on a test box just to get use to it b4 I order the hardware.  
    Friday, January 16, 2015 5:50 PM
  • Hi,

    I suggest you weigh the cost of purchasing hardware, Windows Server license, Windows Server CALs, RDS CALs, etc., versus the cost of a VM in Azure, Amazon, or other provider + RDS CALs.  With automation you could have the VM available for say, 12 hours per day, 6 days per week, and shut down the rest of the time.  This could keep the ongoing cost well under $100/month, especially if you get a discounted price.

    Also I suggest you weigh all of the time required to set things up yourself versus paying an expert to get it all running properly up on Azure or other provider in a matter of hours.  If you do it yourself you will learn a lot, which is a strong benefit.

    If your only purpose for the server is to run QuickBooks, then it may be overkill to purchase your own quality Dell server with redundant hard drives, power supply, etc.

    On the other hand, having a powerful Dell server sitting in your office is a great option.  All depends on your specific needs.

    -TP

    • Marked as answer by RM 2014 Saturday, January 17, 2015 11:51 AM
    Friday, January 16, 2015 6:27 PM
  • Never seen any info on Azure before. Will have to look at it.  If I was able to use that and spend under a $100 a month that would be the way to go.  I will check that out and report back.  I thank you all for all the advice and help.  But I got to say, playing with my own local server would be fun and have room to go.  Might just need to dumb down the hardware a tad on price. 
    Friday, January 16, 2015 7:28 PM
  • Quick ?.  If Im running Hyper-V on a Win 8.1 to test 2012 Server.  Can I do this.  Do I just create the 2 VM without install 2012 first?  Im just using my Home PC to learn.  If I install 2012 in on the VM it says I cant install Hyper-V hypervisor is already running.
    Saturday, January 17, 2015 3:01 AM
  • Hi,

    Yes, create the 2 VMs as if your Windows 8.1 was the Server 2012 Hyper-V host server.  Hyper-V doesn't support nested virtualization, so that is why you cannot install Hyper-V on a 2012 VM.  You don't need to for your testing/learning purposes anyway.

    -TP

    Saturday, January 17, 2015 11:31 PM