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Why does the Search Indexer in Windows 10 insist on indexing the wrong partition? RRS feed

  • Question

  • This applies to Windows 10:

    I have five partitions, in this order, on my computer: OEM Recovery, System Reserved, Windows 7(D:), Windows 8.1 (E:) and Windows 10 (C:).  MBR, the first three are primary, last two are logical in an extended partition, if this makes any difference, which is unlikely.

    When I go into Control Panel's Indexing Options window and click Modify, which brings up the Indexed Locations window, the last three items in the upper, 'Change selected locations' list are Windows 10(C:), Windows 7(D:) and Windows 8.1(E:).

    If I check either Windows 7(D:) or Windows 8.1(E:), the item I checked appears in the lower, 'Summary of selected locations list."

    On the other hand, if I check the Windows 10(C:), 'Windows 7(D:)' appears in the lower list!

    In an attempt to fix this, here's what I've done so far:

    (1) Run the Search Troubleshooter.  The troubleshooter completes stating that it could not find the problem.  No help here!

    (2) In the administrator command window, I ran sfc /scannow.  It completes reporting 'Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations.'

    (3) In the administrator command window, I ran DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth. It completes reporting ''The restore operation completed successfully. The operation completed successfully."

    The problem remains and, as a result, it is impossible to use search indexing in my installation of Windows 10.

    This is a clean new install of windows 10.0.10240 in which this problem manifested from the very beginning.  I tried fixing this (and other problems) by upgrading to 10.0.10532 via the insiders preview program.  No difference!

    It's kind of like the Search Indexer is infected with some kind of 'artificial intelligence' only the opposite.

    I'd really appreciate it if someone could explain how this can be fixed!


     


    Charles S. Cotton


    Sunday, September 13, 2015 10:04 PM

Answers

  • Thanks for going to that much trouble!

    Originally I copied the Windows 7 (Partition 3) to Partition 5 in preparation for the upgrade to Windows 10.  I used Clonezilla to accomplish this.  After completing the Win 10 install, and I noticed this indexing problem, I (among other things) looked in the event log and noticed an event record that stated that a partition was encountered that had a partition id identical to a previously loaded partition id.  At the time, I didn't really know anything about partition ids!

    Since then, I learned about the vol command and downloaded the sysinternals program, "PartitionId.exe"

    Running the 'vol' command did indeed confirm that both the Windows 7 and the new Windows 10 partition had the same Partition ID.

    I changed the partition id for both the Windows 7 and Windows 10 Partitions.  Now they are all unique.

    I had high hopes that this would fix the problem, but the problem persists.  I still wonder, however, if this condition of both windows 7 and windows 10 initially having the same partition id was the root cause of this problem.  Perhaps some other record or registry entry somewhere initially linked partition 3 to the indexer as being the regnant partition for windows 10.

    I realize that this seems a bit silly, but who knows how this information is stored internally for the indexer?

    At any rate, if the writer of the search indexer is still around, he/she would probably know the answer to this question.  I know the fix is there somewhere, it is just hidden from my view right now.

    Thanks again for going to all the trouble of installing windows 7 to test this.


    Charles S. Cotton


    Thursday, September 17, 2015 4:44 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    I installed a Windows 7 on a fresh Windows 10 system for test and tried to reproduce this issue, but unfortunately the index settings worked properly on test machine, when I checked the C partition (Windows 10), D partition wasn’t included under “Summary of selected locations list” in my test machine. Make sure that you didn’t make any change to Library folder such like redirection. You could restore them by right click (Documents etc.)-> Properties->Location->restore Default

    I’d suggest you rebuild the index completely, delete all index file under current location (C:\ProgramData\Microsoft by default). If the issue still persists, Extent C partition and chose the specific folder instead of checking whole C volume. Then click rebuild.

    Regards,

    D. Wu


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, September 17, 2015 2:02 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for going to that much trouble!

    Originally I copied the Windows 7 (Partition 3) to Partition 5 in preparation for the upgrade to Windows 10.  I used Clonezilla to accomplish this.  After completing the Win 10 install, and I noticed this indexing problem, I (among other things) looked in the event log and noticed an event record that stated that a partition was encountered that had a partition id identical to a previously loaded partition id.  At the time, I didn't really know anything about partition ids!

    Since then, I learned about the vol command and downloaded the sysinternals program, "PartitionId.exe"

    Running the 'vol' command did indeed confirm that both the Windows 7 and the new Windows 10 partition had the same Partition ID.

    I changed the partition id for both the Windows 7 and Windows 10 Partitions.  Now they are all unique.

    I had high hopes that this would fix the problem, but the problem persists.  I still wonder, however, if this condition of both windows 7 and windows 10 initially having the same partition id was the root cause of this problem.  Perhaps some other record or registry entry somewhere initially linked partition 3 to the indexer as being the regnant partition for windows 10.

    I realize that this seems a bit silly, but who knows how this information is stored internally for the indexer?

    At any rate, if the writer of the search indexer is still around, he/she would probably know the answer to this question.  I know the fix is there somewhere, it is just hidden from my view right now.

    Thanks again for going to all the trouble of installing windows 7 to test this.


    Charles S. Cotton


    Thursday, September 17, 2015 4:44 AM