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Windows 7 64-bit, with extremely frequent BSODs RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hey, I understand BSODs are frequent topic of discussion here, but each seems to be tailored to the individual victim and, well, I'm a victim.

     

    I built a new computer last Thursday and I've been getting frequent BSODs ever since. I performed a clean install of W7 on Sunday, but the problem still persisted. Today alone I have had 5. I am unable to view the .DMP files myself (I'm cursed with a slow internet connection, and the debugging tools are a massive download), so I'll upload all of them to that Sky Drive thing, in the vain hope someone can save me!

     

    Whilst they're uploading I'll give a little bit more information. The error code is always 2057, and most often I see MEMORY_MANAGEMENT as the cause. I took this to be an issue with my RAM, so I ran the Windows 7 memory checker tool and all 4 sticks came out fine (I'm running with 4 x 2GB). So, I've swapped the RAM around every which way, and I even downgraded to 4GB for a short while, but it BSODed within 5 minutes of booting up.

     

    If it's not the RAM then I can only think it's the hard-drive, since that's the oldest piece of hardware (about 5 years old). It even makes a funny sound when there's activity going on. However, it worked without issue when I had XP installed. Other than that I'm at a loss on what to think. I'm also experiencing frequent crashes in games and with Google Chrome, despite having the latest Nvidia drivers.

     

    Anyway, here are all the DMPs - http://cid-9915741f372cfe53.skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?resid=9915741F372CFE53!105

    Tuesday, January 11, 2011 10:15 PM

Answers

  • Test each RAM module alone for errors to see which one is damaged. download CPU-Z [1], look in the memory and SPD tab and verify that the current RAM Speed and the Timings match to the values that you see in the SPD tab. If your RAM run at CR (Command Rate) 1T, change the value into 2T in the BIOS.

    If you still get error in the memtest, your RAM is damaged and you have to replace them. Look if you have warranty left on the Corsairs.


    André

    [1] http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    • Marked as answer by Domothy Thursday, January 13, 2011 3:38 PM
    Thursday, January 13, 2011 1:31 PM

All replies

  • Based on theory about HDD, there might be a problem in it.

    What company's HDD you use.

    And regarding RAM you better download memtest86+ tool and burn it a CD and the run diagnostic for 5-7 hours. If you find errors its time to change tour RAM.

    Good luck :-)

    Wednesday, January 12, 2011 9:37 AM
  •  The error code is always 2057, and most often I see MEMORY_MANAGEMENT as the cause.

      Bug Check 0x1A: MEMORY_MANAGEMENT

    This indicates that a severe memory management error occurred.

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff557391%28VS.85%29.aspx

    Arguments:
    Arg1: 0000000000041790

    STACK_TEXT: 
    nt!KeBugCheckEx
    nt! ?? ::FNODOBFM::`string'+0x339d6
    nt!MiRemoveMappedView +0xd9
    nt!MmCleanProcessAddressSpace +0x228
    t!PspExitThread+0x47f

        The 41790 code is part of our an internal memory manager code but the bugcheck in my experience has almost always indicated hardware issues (RAM errors).

        Source:
        http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itproperf/thread/68407ce1-7491-4aee-bdef-5ff4bbc56d99/#11ce9f45-7906-4652-9619-a3ad457a87e9

    So, please check your RAM for errors. Please download memtest86+ [1], burn a new bootable CD (use a CD-RW if possible) from the ISO (download and use ImgBurn [2] to do this or make double click on the ISO in Windows 7), reboot your PC and scan your RAM 4-5hours for errors. If it detects errors, replace the faulty RAM. If memtest is fine, run CPU-Z and check the RAM timings. Look at the CR value and if the value is 1T, change it in the BIOS to 2T.

    André

    [1] http://www.memtest.org/download/4.10/memtest86+-4.10.iso.zip
    [2] http://www.imgburn.com/index.php?act=download


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Wednesday, January 12, 2011 12:49 PM
  • Thanks for the speedy replies!

     

    I replaced my hard-drive, and performed a clean install, but the issues still persist (but I needed to upgrade from 250GB anyway, so it's no loss).

     

    I'll run that memtest86 overnight and I'll report the findings in the morning.

    Thursday, January 13, 2011 1:04 AM
  • Ok, 9 hours later and the test found 94 errors with the RAM. So I can only assume that means new RAM for me then?

     

    Is it possible that something in the BIOS settings effectively fried it? I wasn't expecting these kinds of problems with Corsair RAM.

     

    Also, is it possible that there's only one faulty stick that's bringing the other 3 down? Or is that unlikely?

    Thursday, January 13, 2011 10:17 AM
  • Test each RAM module alone for errors to see which one is damaged. download CPU-Z [1], look in the memory and SPD tab and verify that the current RAM Speed and the Timings match to the values that you see in the SPD tab. If your RAM run at CR (Command Rate) 1T, change the value into 2T in the BIOS.

    If you still get error in the memtest, your RAM is damaged and you have to replace them. Look if you have warranty left on the Corsairs.


    André

    [1] http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    • Marked as answer by Domothy Thursday, January 13, 2011 3:38 PM
    Thursday, January 13, 2011 1:31 PM
  • Ok, it seems 1 of them is faulty. I'll replace that and see how it goes for a few days. Many, many thanks for you're help! You're a bona fide saviour.
    Thursday, January 13, 2011 3:38 PM