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Representing Purchased Parts in the Schedule RRS feed

  • Question

  • I guess I'm looking for best practice advice.  In a manufacturing envionment, many of our parts are simply purchased.  What is the correct way to represent those purchases in the schedule when other manufactuing tasks depend on the purchase and recepit of those parts?  Purchasing the part requires minimal labor, so I thought we could do a 1hr task with X-days lag to account for shipping.  When the part is actually ordered, the task goes from 0% to 50% complete.  When it's received, it goes to 100%.

    Does all that sound pretty standard?

    Tuesday, January 17, 2012 8:24 PM

Answers

  • Kevin --
     
    I would break the job into two tasks called Order Part and Part Received.  I would set the Duration of the Order Part task to 1 day with a resource assigned to do 1 hour of Work.  I would make the Part Received a milestone and then link tese two tasks with a Finish to Start dependency.  On Part Received milestone task, set a Start No Earlier Than constraint and set the Constraint Date to the date you expect to receive the part.
     
    When the part is ordered, mark the Order Part task as 100% complete.  When the part is actually received, enter the date of receipt in the Actual Finish field (this field is in the Tracking table) for the task and then mark the task as 100% complete.  This would be my personal best practice for doing what you want to do.  Hope this helps.

    Dale A. Howard [MVP]
    VP of Educational Services
    msProjectExperts
    http://www.msprojectexperts.com
    http://www.projectserverexperts.com
    "We write the books on Project Server"

    Tuesday, January 17, 2012 8:43 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Kevin --
     
    I would break the job into two tasks called Order Part and Part Received.  I would set the Duration of the Order Part task to 1 day with a resource assigned to do 1 hour of Work.  I would make the Part Received a milestone and then link tese two tasks with a Finish to Start dependency.  On Part Received milestone task, set a Start No Earlier Than constraint and set the Constraint Date to the date you expect to receive the part.
     
    When the part is ordered, mark the Order Part task as 100% complete.  When the part is actually received, enter the date of receipt in the Actual Finish field (this field is in the Tracking table) for the task and then mark the task as 100% complete.  This would be my personal best practice for doing what you want to do.  Hope this helps.

    Dale A. Howard [MVP]
    VP of Educational Services
    msProjectExperts
    http://www.msprojectexperts.com
    http://www.projectserverexperts.com
    "We write the books on Project Server"

    Tuesday, January 17, 2012 8:43 PM
    Moderator
  • I worked on a framwork at Boeing years ago that used the basic idea that Dale talks about to track supplier performance. Saved them a ton of money by allowing them to more easily track when suppliers were in violation of their Service agreements. In that process it was one task so they could more easily see the duration. the start was when it was ordered and the finish when they expecte to get it. they saved the baseline of the task to be the promised duration from the supplier and then they entered the actual reciept into the Actual Finish date.
    Brian Kennemer – DeltaBahn Senior Architect
    endlessly obsessing about Project Server…so that you don’t have to.
    Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn
    Tuesday, January 17, 2012 8:55 PM
    Moderator
  • Brian --
     
    Cool.  Thanks for sharing.

    Dale A. Howard [MVP]
    VP of Educational Services
    msProjectExperts
    http://www.msprojectexperts.com
    http://www.projectserverexperts.com
    "We write the books on Project Server"

    Tuesday, January 17, 2012 8:56 PM
    Moderator
  • funny that it came up. it was the first thing I ever did in MS Project back with 4.1. I was a small cog in a big machine but it is fun to remember the first time working with Project. :-)
    Brian Kennemer – DeltaBahn Senior Architect
    endlessly obsessing about Project Server…so that you don’t have to.
    Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn
    Tuesday, January 17, 2012 11:06 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Brian.  Very interesting indeed.  I was initially looking at simply the scheduling question, but being able to use this to measure supplier performance is even better.
    Wednesday, January 18, 2012 3:25 PM
  • Thank you, Dale! This is perfect.

    Kevin

    Wednesday, January 18, 2012 3:26 PM
  • Kevin --
     
    You are more than welcome for the help, my friend!  I hope the Drillers have a good season this summer...

    Dale A. Howard [MVP]
    VP of Educational Services
    msProjectExperts
    http://www.msprojectexperts.com
    http://www.projectserverexperts.com
    "We write the books on Project Server"

    Wednesday, January 18, 2012 7:33 PM
    Moderator
  • Me too Dale.  They've moved since you were last here.  They have a brand new park right in the middle of downtown with wonderful views of the surrounding buildings.  We'll have to get you back out here one of these days and get to a ball game.
    Wednesday, January 18, 2012 7:58 PM