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Can a Windows 7 upgrade pack work with Windows 7 RC RRS feed

  • Question

  • i want to know if the Windows 7 upgrade pack can work with Windows 7 RC as your preinstalled OS. considering it is older, it should be able to detect it as a version of Vista but i want to make sure so i dont waste money and screw my new computer over.

    In short, look at the title.

    hope this helps, nitrous_74
    Sunday, October 11, 2009 4:07 PM

Answers

  • As Carey mentioned, it cannot be used on an RC version. Thus we will need a full installation disk.

    Further information please refer How to upgrade from Windows 7 RC to a release version of Windows 7

    • Proposed as answer by JoelbX Monday, October 12, 2009 6:41 PM
    • Marked as answer by Carey FrischMVP Monday, October 12, 2009 7:21 PM
    Monday, October 12, 2009 7:39 AM
  • No.  An upgrade version of Windows 7 requires a qualifying Windows XP or Windows Vista operating system to be installed.
    Carey Frisch
    • Proposed as answer by JoelbX Monday, October 12, 2009 6:41 PM
    • Marked as answer by Carey FrischMVP Monday, October 12, 2009 7:21 PM
    Monday, October 12, 2009 3:36 AM
  • "You speak authoritatively, yet I see no links."

    I restrict myself predominately to speaking about stuff which I definitively know and understand.  If comments in my posts are 'opinion' rather than genuinely factual they will be accompanied by disclaimers such as "I think" or "I believe" etc.  No links were necessary.


    "..the quoted paragraph of  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/975452  above could be construed as permission."


    KB975452 neglects to specifically state the fact, but it relates to the procedure of performing an over the top upgrade and not to the legality/legitimacy of the Windows 7 RC build as a 'valid qualifying product' for a Windows 7 license upgrade.  The information previously available at Microsoft store mentioned that a Release Candidate install would allow the Upgrade key to be accepted and used, but did not state that the RC build would serve the role of a legitimate 'qualifying version' for a license upgrade.

    install upgrade /= license upgrade!  The two are completely differenet concepts!

    A license upgrade is a legal process which converts an earlier version license into a later version license.  Windows 7 Release Candidate is not an 'earlier version'.  It is instead an earlier build of the same version.




    As mentioned, "it is possible" does not always mean the same thing as "it is sanctioned".  I cannot see how anybody could reasonably construe KB 97542 as somehow being justification for abusing the licensing conditions.
    Hi Techwriter

    I agree.

    As Shaon stated, "Thus we will need a full installation disk" There is a scenario where this would be an unquestionable 'legal upgrade', use the procedure to perform an In-place installation using a Full version of Windows 7, which is the RTM version that everyone is currently using.

    As far as using the 'upgrade' version and ending up with a legally licensed install, I believe this would be a violation according to the very specific requirements that state Vista is the only qualifying product that allows an In-place upgrade.

    The only way we will get the answer to this is after the GA and someone actually uses a true upgrade version to try this.

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for using Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Tuesday, October 13, 2009 12:06 AM

All replies

  • No.  An upgrade version of Windows 7 requires a qualifying Windows XP or Windows Vista operating system to be installed.
    Carey Frisch
    • Proposed as answer by JoelbX Monday, October 12, 2009 6:41 PM
    • Marked as answer by Carey FrischMVP Monday, October 12, 2009 7:21 PM
    Monday, October 12, 2009 3:36 AM
  • As Carey mentioned, it cannot be used on an RC version. Thus we will need a full installation disk.

    Further information please refer How to upgrade from Windows 7 RC to a release version of Windows 7

    • Proposed as answer by JoelbX Monday, October 12, 2009 6:41 PM
    • Marked as answer by Carey FrischMVP Monday, October 12, 2009 7:21 PM
    Monday, October 12, 2009 7:39 AM
  •  i want to make sure so i dont waste money and screw my new computer over.
    If you don't have a legally valid 'qualifying product' then you need to purchase a full license copy of Windows 7. 


    It is possible to modify the install disk to allow it to perform an upgrade install over Windows 7 RC.  The procedure is described in the Microsoft KB database, although it is specified as not a 'recommended' procedure.  Information previously published on the Microsoft Store website categorically stated that the Windows 7 Update installer will accept a Windows 7 RC installation and allow an install to proceed.



    That doesn't mean, however, that you would end up with a licensed installation of Windows 7 after performing the above procedures.  Your end result would not be a licensed installation because you would not have fulfilled all the legal requirements.  The fact that something is possible doesn't in itself make it something we are allowed to do!
    Monday, October 12, 2009 4:45 PM
  • Even though I've spent a fair amount of time customizing my copy of RC1, I will do a clean install when I get my released copy of Win 7. I do this for any pre-release software. To me it doesn't make sense to upgrade a beta or RC version. Why take the chance on future problems? Take what you've learned from the pre-released version and start fresh.

    As a learning experience it might be fun though!
    Monday, October 12, 2009 8:31 PM
  • "You speak authoritatively, yet I see no links."

    I restrict myself predominately to speaking about stuff which I definitively know and understand.  If comments in my posts are 'opinion' rather than genuinely factual they will be accompanied by disclaimers such as "I think" or "I believe" etc.  No links were necessary.


    "..the quoted paragraph of  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/975452  above could be construed as permission."


    KB975452 neglects to specifically state the fact, but it relates to the procedure of performing an over the top upgrade and not to the legality/legitimacy of the Windows 7 RC build as a 'valid qualifying product' for a Windows 7 license upgrade.  The information previously available at Microsoft store mentioned that a Release Candidate install would allow the Upgrade key to be accepted and used, but did not state that the RC build would serve the role of a legitimate 'qualifying version' for a license upgrade.

    install upgrade /= license upgrade!  The two are completely differenet concepts!

    A license upgrade is a legal process which converts an earlier version license into a later version license.  Windows 7 Release Candidate is not an 'earlier version'.  It is instead an earlier build of the same version.




    As mentioned, "it is possible" does not always mean the same thing as "it is sanctioned".  I cannot see how anybody could reasonably construe KB 97542 as somehow being justification for abusing the licensing conditions.
    Monday, October 12, 2009 8:45 PM
  • well...since http://support.microsoft.com/kb/975452 is MS certified i think we can unanimously agree that it is trustable.

    thanks for the tip off, but since i have Win7 RC Ultimate and i wanted Home Premium (again, no need wasting money) this does me little good.

    hope this helps, nitrous_74
    Monday, October 12, 2009 11:26 PM
  • "You speak authoritatively, yet I see no links."

    I restrict myself predominately to speaking about stuff which I definitively know and understand.  If comments in my posts are 'opinion' rather than genuinely factual they will be accompanied by disclaimers such as "I think" or "I believe" etc.  No links were necessary.


    "..the quoted paragraph of  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/975452  above could be construed as permission."


    KB975452 neglects to specifically state the fact, but it relates to the procedure of performing an over the top upgrade and not to the legality/legitimacy of the Windows 7 RC build as a 'valid qualifying product' for a Windows 7 license upgrade.  The information previously available at Microsoft store mentioned that a Release Candidate install would allow the Upgrade key to be accepted and used, but did not state that the RC build would serve the role of a legitimate 'qualifying version' for a license upgrade.

    install upgrade /= license upgrade!  The two are completely differenet concepts!

    A license upgrade is a legal process which converts an earlier version license into a later version license.  Windows 7 Release Candidate is not an 'earlier version'.  It is instead an earlier build of the same version.




    As mentioned, "it is possible" does not always mean the same thing as "it is sanctioned".  I cannot see how anybody could reasonably construe KB 97542 as somehow being justification for abusing the licensing conditions.
    Hi Techwriter

    I agree.

    As Shaon stated, "Thus we will need a full installation disk" There is a scenario where this would be an unquestionable 'legal upgrade', use the procedure to perform an In-place installation using a Full version of Windows 7, which is the RTM version that everyone is currently using.

    As far as using the 'upgrade' version and ending up with a legally licensed install, I believe this would be a violation according to the very specific requirements that state Vista is the only qualifying product that allows an In-place upgrade.

    The only way we will get the answer to this is after the GA and someone actually uses a true upgrade version to try this.

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for using Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Tuesday, October 13, 2009 12:06 AM
  • well...since http://support.microsoft.com/kb/975452 is MS certified i think we can unanimously agree that it is trustable.

    thanks for the tip off, but since i have Win7 RC Ultimate and i wanted Home Premium (again, no need wasting money) this does me little good.

    nitrous, no need to worry about the so-called 'certified' expression from Microsoft.  I can definitively confirm that the RC install can be 'upgraded' to an RTM install because I've already done it and confirmed that it works just fine!

    I'm a Technet subscriber, have had RTM Windows 7 for a while now, and have installed RTM code on machines without wiping and starting over again.  Over the top upgrade install works perfectly well!



    "Trustable"?  For what?  Some of you seem confused into thinking that your viewing of the word "upgrade" somehow means the use of (and legitimacy of using) an upgrade license pack.  It doesn't, in the context of that KB article.  The article refers only to the procedure of performing an in place upgrade install.



    It is quite possible that the RC install will be interpreted, by the Windows 7 installer, as a qualifying product.  I'd be immensely surprised if it doesn't.  The installer necessarily has to be able to upgrade install over the same Windows release.  Qualifying product, in both a practical and a legal sense, is always an 'earliest version or later' arrangment.  Otherwise repair installs would be rendered impossible. 


    All of that STILL doesn't make the use of a freebie pre-release build as a qualifying product legitimate for licensing purposes.  You can edit the cversion.ini file and I'm sure that'll make not only the upgrade install possible but also the upgrade key/installer combination work with it.  Stands to reason that it needs to be able to, if the minimum build number requirement is met!  But you'd only get a 'working' installation, not a legitimately licensed one.




    By the way.  If I'm correct (as I firmly believe I am) that'd mean the transition from RC install to Home Premium install, using an upgrade pack, would certainly be possible.  You'd only need to perform a custom clean install using the upgrade media/key!
    Tuesday, October 13, 2009 12:48 AM