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INFORMATION - Clean Windows 7 Install with Upgrade Media RRS feed

  • Question

  • I was wondering about this question, and apparently other users have it too (from what I have seen):

    Is it possible to perform a clean install (on a blank hard drive) with Windows 7 Upgrade media?
    Friday, October 23, 2009 1:27 AM

Answers

  • What if the HDD fails and I need to do an install on a clean HDD?
    I've just set all my clients out to purchase UPGRADE versions of Windows 7. One of the BIGGEST failures I tend to fix is dead hard drives.
    Are you telling me that if their HDD fails, I need to install a new HDD, load it with their previous operating system, activate that OS, THEN do the Windows 7 Upgrade with a clean install? You've just tacked 2 hours onto the job.
    Whatever happened to "insert previous OS disk"? my clients have been good at keeping all their disks... now this?
    The brilliance of Windows 7 for me was the lightning fast installs... but that's all ____ if I have to install XP, 2000 or Vista first before I can even use the friggin thing.
    Hi

    You simply follow the advice that Carey posted and show your customers how to create and maintain System Images on external media, using the built-in Imaging Program.

    If they have a disaster, it takes around 15 minutes to recover. Once you complete the initial install, you should never need to worry about the previous versions again.

    Regards,


    Thank You for using Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Friday, October 23, 2009 11:38 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi

    Anything is possible. You could also make a couple hundred copies of a software installation disk and sell them for 20 dollars each, or rob your neighbors house, but this does not mean it is OK to do this.

    This hack for using the upgrade media has been around for almost 4 years now. It clearly violates the terms of the license agreement (EULA).

    Microsoft could easily pull the plug on this capability at any time and I wish they would.

    Please read the following article and then let your conscience be your guide.

    The Vista license "loophole" that isn't

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for using Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Friday, October 23, 2009 2:57 AM
    Moderator
  • Q. "People want to install and sometimes reinstall with minimal hassle.  Have you considered that?"

    A.  Absolutely!  That is why every edition of Windows 7 includes an application to make a System Image Backup.  Please see: How to Create a System Image Backup in Windows 7
    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 1:33 PM
    Moderator
  • Hundreds of forum comments and reports on tech blogs  across the net are reporting that Upgrade disk can clean install at boot to formatted HDD's.  It worked for me and the moderator at 7 forums who stickied it on their Install forum, where many others confirm it - while some say it won't work and they had to use the "upgrade over upgrade" method.

    But now Paul Thurrot chimes in with a workaround to get a clean install from Upgrade disk to new HDD:

    http://community.winsupersite.com/blogs/paul/archive/2009/10/23/clean-install-windows-7-with-upgrade-media-the-answer.aspx

    This may be the same fix MS is giving some who called to ask how to get a clean install like they've heard.

    Personally, I  formatted my HDD from the Upgrade installer after putting in my key and it auto-activated at startup from the Properties page activation link. 

    Paul Thurrot did chime in and he does not say anything about Microsoft Genuine Advantage flagging the upgrade license as non-genuine sometime in the future.  After all, it still only a Upgrade license!  I would should hate to see folks having their "clean install" with Windows 7 Upgrade media become non-genuine down the road!
    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 9:16 PM
    Moderator
  • Windows 7 makes restoring easy!  All you do is create a System Image Backup after installing Windows 7.  Then if you have to restore Windows 7 to a new hard drive, you simply use the System Image Backup.

    Please see: How to Create a System Image Backup in Windows 7 and Restoring Windows 7 from a Backup System Image

    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 11:39 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Ms and the MVP's correctly maintain that upgrade media will not install directly on a virgin blank hard drive.

    However many users are finding that so called upgrade media is behaving like full retail media and can be used to boot a computer with a blank disc
    and setup and activate win 7.

    Something is very wrong here.

    Can someone please confirm once and for all.
    Are there actually upgrade media 'keys' or are they all 'full' keys??



    Friday, October 23, 2009 2:27 AM
  • Hi

    Anything is possible. You could also make a couple hundred copies of a software installation disk and sell them for 20 dollars each, or rob your neighbors house, but this does not mean it is OK to do this.

    This hack for using the upgrade media has been around for almost 4 years now. It clearly violates the terms of the license agreement (EULA).

    Microsoft could easily pull the plug on this capability at any time and I wish they would.

    Please read the following article and then let your conscience be your guide.

    The Vista license "loophole" that isn't

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for using Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Friday, October 23, 2009 2:57 AM
    Moderator
  • Hello,

     

    According to Microsoft official announcement, you should have either Windows XP or Windows Vista OS on the computer before installing Windows 7 via the upgrade media. Certainly, I also found some articles on Internet mentioned that someone can successfully clean install with Windows 7 Upgrade media, however it is not recommended/supported by Microsoft. Whether or not you are able to activate the product finally is at your own risk and I don’t think it is a good topic to discuss in this forum. Thanks for your time and understanding!

     

    Andy

    Friday, October 23, 2009 8:44 AM
  • ...Whether or not you are able to activate the product finally is at your own risk and I don’t think it is a good topic to discuss in this forum. ...

     

    Andy

    You've got to be kidding.  

    People want to install and sometimes reinstall with minimal hassle.  The more information they have the better able they are to accomplish an install that won't leave them frustrated with MS.  Have you considered that?

    When I'm in a jam and trying to get up and running as fast as possible that's all I care about.  The suggestion that everyone should withhold information for the good of MS's ill-advised anti-piracy measures is ludicrous.   





    Friday, October 23, 2009 1:15 PM
  • Ms and the MVP's correctly maintain that upgrade media will not install directly on a virgin blank hard drive.

    However many users are finding that so called upgrade media is behaving like full retail media and can be used to boot a computer with a blank disc
    and setup and activate win 7.

    Something is very wrong here.

    Can someone please confirm once and for all.
    Are there actually upgrade media 'keys' or are they all 'full' keys??




    The student windows 7 version available thru www.win741.com is the FULL VERSION. Many folks thought is was an upgrade version.


    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 1:29 PM
    Moderator
  • Q. "People want to install and sometimes reinstall with minimal hassle.  Have you considered that?"

    A.  Absolutely!  That is why every edition of Windows 7 includes an application to make a System Image Backup.  Please see: How to Create a System Image Backup in Windows 7
    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 1:33 PM
    Moderator
  • I spent 3 hours on the phone with Microsoft technical support yesterday 10/22/2009.

    I purchased Windows 7 professional UPGRADE download version from Microsoft store on a pre order basis back in July of this year.

    I received the option to download 4 different versions of Pro.

    1st one was "Download 32 bit (recommended)"
    2nd was "Download 64 bit"
    3rd was "Download 32 bit ISO"
    4th was "Download 64 bit ISO"

    I chose the 64 bit ISO.

    I successfully burned the ISO to a DVD.

    I booted into the 32 bit XP desktop as Carey Frisch alluded to in this response to a question.
    http://social.answers.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7install/thread/6406974b-5604-47e4-b384-887bf10f08d9

    Inserted the installation DVD into the drive as the instructions in the above link said to do and was immediatly presented with an error: This version is not compatible with this operating system. Please boot from this installation disc and choose custom install. The wording is not exact, but I could not install this 64 bit upgrade installation from the XP desktop.

    The MS tech instructed me to boot from the installation disk, which I did. I pointed the install to the XP partition, it formatted it and installed. I could have pointed the installation to any partition or disk.

    Since this was really not a clean upgrade path as the installer did not check to see if I had a previous version of Windows on it I kept questioning him about the product key being denied as it was an UPGRADE key. His response was just go ahead and do it.

    When prompted to enter the key during installation I skipped it.

    In the meantime I was disconnected from the MS tech.

    It installed just fine. I went into the activation screen and entered the UPGRADE key and it took it.

    The MS technician did call me back about 3 hours later, apologized for the disconnection and asked how things went.

    I told him it went fine, but since this was an UPGRADE key and it wasn't entered in until after XP had been wiped clean I asked him how come the UPGRADE key worked on a non-upgrade installation (Full Packaged Product). He was surprised that it actually activated the installation with the UPGRADE key. He asked me to read the Windows Activation section, give him the Product ID and asked me if it actually said "Windows is activated" It was. He also said that there was mass confusion about this exact issue.

    1. Carey Frisch was wrong. It's probably due to misinformation that was received about how to do this. You cannot install a 64 bit application from a 32 bit desktop.


    2. Am I in violation of EULA as Ronnie says when I was told to do it that way by MS Tech?

      



    Friday, October 23, 2009 4:30 PM
  • I haven't tried activation yet, because my laptop isn't on the Internet (I don't want to plug it into the work network) However, I did a custom install, blew away the existing volumes for the RC, and the install at least tried activation. It might fail when I actually attempt to activate it, but entering the product key didn't generate any warnings.

    However, the golden standard is activation - and at least one person has reported that booting the upgrade DVD, doing a custom install, and entering the key AFTER the OS is up and running allowed his upgrade license to activate successfully. If so, this is actually an improvement over Vista, where you had to upgrade over the clean install.

    Of course, it is possible that this works fine on my Dell laptop because the licensing data is stored in the BIOS. I don't have to enter any keys when I use the restore CD - as apparently it finds a valid key in the hardware. It might not go so well on my white box PC. Frankly, I hope this is the case, as it would make life with the upgrade DVD a lot easier.
    Friday, October 23, 2009 5:18 PM
  • If you had a valid XP license, and aren't still using it, I don't see how you would be in violation of the EULA. Technically, you could still run your copy of XP in a VM, or as a dual-boot, at which point you would be in violation, but for now, it sounds like you are 100% legal.
    Friday, October 23, 2009 5:20 PM
  • @Conradhedberg

    I am stunned that you can just skip the Product Key during the install of the upgrade version.  This is the info I needed and MS couldn't tell me last night!!!  I sat on hold with MS tech support last night for about two hours as they gave me the run around and made me call two different numbers until they finally hung up on me.

    My scenario: Dell PC from ~2005 with Windows XP.  I bought Win 7 Home Premium Upgrade from Best Buy and a new Hard Drive.  I disconnected my old HDD and put in my blank new one, booted the Win 7 32-bit Upgrade DVD and thought I was golden until I got to the Enter Product Key screen in the installer and it wouldn't take the one that I was entering.  MS support even gave me a new Product Key over the phone and it wouldn't take it, so today I returned my DVD/box thinking it was defective.  Sure enough it's probably just not a supported scenario for the upgrade key.  Hopefully it will take the activation once the system is back up and running.

    I just don't understand why they would even make the DVD bootable if you MUST start from Windows?

    There's nothing describing why this scenario shouldn't work on the install web sites.  Strange that a seasoned IT pro was left calling tech support and thinking I had a bad key or disc.  Even if they had said "you have to run the setup from in your old OS first" or "if you have a new HDD but want to use the upgrade media, just don't enter the product key when asked.  Enter it after the OS install is complete." it would have been better...
    • Edited by Deadwigg Friday, October 23, 2009 8:40 PM clarity
    Friday, October 23, 2009 8:37 PM
  • Hundreds of forum comments and reports on tech blogs  across the net are reporting that Upgrade disk can clean install at boot to formatted HDD's.  It worked for me and the moderator at 7 forums who stickied it on their Install forum, where many others confirm it - while some say it won't work and they had to use the "upgrade over upgrade" method.

    But now Paul Thurrot chimes in with a workaround to get a clean install from Upgrade disk to new HDD:

    http://community.winsupersite.com/blogs/paul/archive/2009/10/23/clean-install-windows-7-with-upgrade-media-the-answer.aspx

    This may be the same fix MS is giving some who called to ask how to get a clean install like they've heard.

    Personally, I  formatted my HDD from the Upgrade installer after putting in my key and it auto-activated at startup from the Properties page activation link. 
    Friday, October 23, 2009 8:54 PM
  • Vista also allowed you to skip the product key during setup - presumably to allow for either evaluation. This is how the double-install trick worked.
    That said, we've been complaining about the lack of clarity on this issue for a while. I suspected strongly that there would be work arounds for the upgrade, so I kept my $50 pre-orders. As it turns out, there are methods for doing a fresh, clean install from the upgrade media.

    My guess is that Microsoft wants the murkiness surrounding upgrades in order to promote sales of full versions. Still, I'm not sure why Microsoft didn't go for the easy, and obvious, "enter your old key here" method. No double installs, no tweaking the registry, no having to reinstall the old OS and activate - adding an hour or so to the install. It's not like they can't check that both keys are valid and move on.

    Sure, there is the slight chance you could swing by your local computer store and copy a code down, and perhaps that's why they didn't go for it, but I suspect that would have been a harder system to hack than the current one. After all, all the validation is on their end.
    Friday, October 23, 2009 9:02 PM
  • It may activate, but down the road Microsoft Genuine Advantage may flag the license as non-genuine since it is only an upgrade license.  We'll have to wait and see!  I don't wish to promote this type of workaround if there is a possibility a user will experience a WGA issue sometime in the future!
    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 9:10 PM
    Moderator
  • Hundreds of forum comments and reports on tech blogs  across the net are reporting that Upgrade disk can clean install at boot to formatted HDD's.  It worked for me and the moderator at 7 forums who stickied it on their Install forum, where many others confirm it - while some say it won't work and they had to use the "upgrade over upgrade" method.

    But now Paul Thurrot chimes in with a workaround to get a clean install from Upgrade disk to new HDD:

    http://community.winsupersite.com/blogs/paul/archive/2009/10/23/clean-install-windows-7-with-upgrade-media-the-answer.aspx

    This may be the same fix MS is giving some who called to ask how to get a clean install like they've heard.

    Personally, I  formatted my HDD from the Upgrade installer after putting in my key and it auto-activated at startup from the Properties page activation link. 

    Paul Thurrot did chime in and he does not say anything about Microsoft Genuine Advantage flagging the upgrade license as non-genuine sometime in the future.  After all, it still only a Upgrade license!  I would should hate to see folks having their "clean install" with Windows 7 Upgrade media become non-genuine down the road!
    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 9:16 PM
    Moderator
  • I would hope it wouldn't, since the "double install" is how Microsoft told me to handle a Win2k upgrade. If, at some point, the Win2k machine that I'm upgrading gets flagged as non-genuine, I would be highly irritated. I have gotten confirmation from two different contacts in MS - the store, and an escalation person. Both assured me that this would allow me to upgrade from Win2k.

    Now, the registry trick might result in a WGA flag down the road. I could see not recommending that technique - even if it is way more convenient than the double install.
    Friday, October 23, 2009 9:32 PM
  • I have a fully legal license for XP
    Soon I will have a Win 7 legal update version license.

    And I will activate and if I ever have any problems with MGA I will be most upset.
    Friday, October 23, 2009 10:23 PM
  • I would suggest reading Paragraph 5 (Validation) of the Windows 7 License Agreement.
    Type Winver in the Search Programs and files box to access it.
    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 10:39 PM
    Moderator
  • I am still running a preview release,(waiting for my 3 copies to arrive from Amazon), and the EULA might be different from RTM but I can not see anything in Par 5 that would exclude me from Activation and validation. I am compliant as far as I can tell. Certainly hope so.
    Friday, October 23, 2009 10:48 PM
  • Q. "People want to install and sometimes reinstall with minimal hassle.  Have you considered that?"

    A.  Absolutely!  That is why every edition of Windows 7 includes an application to make a System Image Backup .  Please see: How to Create a System Image Backup in Windows 7
    Carey Frisch

    What if the HDD fails and I need to do an install on a clean HDD?
    I've just set all my clients out to purchase UPGRADE versions of Windows 7. One of the BIGGEST failures I tend to fix is dead hard drives.
    Are you telling me that if their HDD fails, I need to install a new HDD, load it with their previous operating system, activate that OS, THEN do the Windows 7 Upgrade with a clean install? You've just tacked 2 hours onto the job.
    Whatever happened to "insert previous OS disk"? my clients have been good at keeping all their disks... now this?
    The brilliance of Windows 7 for me was the lightning fast installs... but that's all ____ if I have to install XP, 2000 or Vista first before I can even use the friggin thing.
    Friday, October 23, 2009 11:28 PM
  • What if the HDD fails and I need to do an install on a clean HDD?
    I've just set all my clients out to purchase UPGRADE versions of Windows 7. One of the BIGGEST failures I tend to fix is dead hard drives.
    Are you telling me that if their HDD fails, I need to install a new HDD, load it with their previous operating system, activate that OS, THEN do the Windows 7 Upgrade with a clean install? You've just tacked 2 hours onto the job.
    Whatever happened to "insert previous OS disk"? my clients have been good at keeping all their disks... now this?
    The brilliance of Windows 7 for me was the lightning fast installs... but that's all ____ if I have to install XP, 2000 or Vista first before I can even use the friggin thing.
    Hi

    You simply follow the advice that Carey posted and show your customers how to create and maintain System Images on external media, using the built-in Imaging Program.

    If they have a disaster, it takes around 15 minutes to recover. Once you complete the initial install, you should never need to worry about the previous versions again.

    Regards,


    Thank You for using Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Friday, October 23, 2009 11:38 PM
    Moderator
  • Windows 7 makes restoring easy!  All you do is create a System Image Backup after installing Windows 7.  Then if you have to restore Windows 7 to a new hard drive, you simply use the System Image Backup.

    Please see: How to Create a System Image Backup in Windows 7 and Restoring Windows 7 from a Backup System Image

    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 23, 2009 11:39 PM
    Moderator
  • Carey,

    Quote: "It may activate, but down the road Microsoft Genuine Advantage may flag the license as non-genuine since it is only an upgrade license."

    Could you please tell me how I (we) was (were) supposed to do this?

    How are you to Clean Upgrade a XP 32 bit installation to a Windows 7 64 bit installation without doing what I did at the Techs direction?


    You cannot install the 64 bit Windows 7 from the 32 bit XP desktop -I tried and tried before I even called.

    There is no documentation anywhere on the MS sites that says this XP 32 bit clean upgrade to a 64 bit windows 7 is not supported or in violation of EULA.

    The instructions I read said "boot into the former qualifying OS and install the upgrade from there, either 32 bit or 64 bit".

    That does not work.





    Friday, October 23, 2009 11:50 PM
  • Was your Windows XP partition formatted FAT 32 instead of NTFS?  If it was, that could have been the reason you could not install Windows 7 64-bit following my procedure.
    Carey Frisch
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 12:03 AM
    Moderator
  • Paul Thurrot did chime in and he does not say anything about Microsoft Genuine Advantage flagging the upgrade license as non-genuine sometime in the future.  After all, it still only a Upgrade license!  I would should hate to see folks having their "clean install" with Windows 7 Upgrade media become non-genuine down the road!
    Carey Frisch

    Carey I called MS Tech support and they said the Upgrade can clean install to formatted drive, that no previous version needs to be present.

    My question is how would WGA later detect that no previous activated XP/Vista had been installed after the Upgrade installer went ahead and clean formatted to a formatted drive? 

    I had an image of the qualifying XP standing by and ready to put back on if necessary.  Are you saying I need to delete my perfectly configured activated formatted Win7 Upgrade install so that I can reimage the XP onto the drive and start the Upgrade from its desktop?  That this is what all of the hundreds if not thousands of those who clean installed with Upgrades must do to avoid being caught up at some point by WGA?

     Frankly, I would wait until such a situation arose before going to all the trouble.   And I am a guy who loves reinstalling (about to be be replaced by Win7 backup imaging)!
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 12:28 AM
  • This requires MS to make a statement about whether they intend(ed) this or not. 

    Yahoo has up on their news page right now that Upgrades allow clean installs for the first time. 

    Why would MS not acknowledge this, or could it have been intended just for certain Upgrade sku's or licenses like preorders (perhaps extra thanks to beta testers?).  Andy Song said last night that this is "best not discussed" here which makes it seem even more like it was a gift with a MS wink.

    This is sheer confusion and it involves thousands now, not a dozens or hundreds, and will soon be millions.
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 12:38 AM
  • This requires MS to make a statement about whether they intend(ed) this or not. 

    Yahoo has up on their news page right now that Upgrades allow clean installs for the first time. 

    Why would MS not acknowledge this, or could it have been intended just for certain Upgrade sku's or licenses like preorders (perhaps extra thanks to beta testers?).  Andy Song said last night that this is "best not discussed" here which makes it seem even more like it was a gift with a MS wink.

    This is sheer confusion and it involves thousands now, not a dozens or hundreds, and will soon be millions.

    I too would like to understand what is going on. MS has handled the whole upgrade question poorly as well as yesterdays download fiasco. Yesterday on this site there were 2 posts , one above the other, by MVP's and they both contradicted each other. If the VP's don't know what is going on , God help us.......
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 1:06 AM
  • I can understand MS not wanting upgrade versions to be able to do clean installs from scratch. Elsewise, why would anyone pay for a full version. Most people aren't going to understand the legal implications, or simply not care.

    However, on the flip side, the way that Microsoft intended the upgrades to work was extremely onerous on the end user. Requiring users to image their drives, while a good idea, is farcical for most people. The idea of having to bring up two operating systems on a replacement drive is likewise farcical. Seriously, Microsoft expects you to spend an hour or two installing an OS you fully intend to dump as soon as its up and running? I know upgrades are cheap for a reason, but seriously - that's unnecessary.

    I can't help but think there had to be a better way to handle this. I still believe a method that required you to enter your old key would have been more ideal. If it had been activated, as required, Microsoft could have verified this when you activated the new license. I could have even dealt with Microsoft invalidating the old key, and upgrading your "upgrade" key to a "full" key. That would have completely eliminated most of these problems, and been beneficial to both Microsoft and the end user.

    I'm going to upgrade using a clean install to a formatted disk. I don't want any remnants of the old OS that I don't manually put in myself. I've already backed up all of my stuff to my external RAID, and just for good measure, I'm imaging the disk as well. As far as I'm concerned, I have an XP COA on the bottom of the machine, so I believe I am well within the EULA.

    That aside, though; I've been tickled pink with the RTM. It's actually faster than the RC - unlike Vista, where the RC was faster than the RTM. Aside from the slightly greater memory usage, it feels like XP in terms of speed and responsiveness. The install was also blindingly simple, and quite fast.

    It's a very nice upgrade.
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 2:37 AM
  • Carey,

    I have not used FAT 32 for years, unless it's for a USB drive.

    The XP partition was NTFS, along with every other drive on this system.

    I'm still confused, but all I know is it would not run from within XP 32 bit.

    Autorun, setup.exe, nothing.

    I was thinking about copying all the files from the Win 7 64 bit DVD to a folder on the XP desktop and trying it again, but I called MS instead.

    I should have just followed the instructions in the error message to boot from the DVD and select Custom Install.



    Saturday, October 24, 2009 3:41 PM
  • I am all for MS being able to profit from its creations. But for heavens sake, this whole process needs
    to be simplified. I have never read so much garbage mumbo jumbo on any website ever as I have in the last few months on MS websites. And I am a retired IT guy of 25 years and should be able to understand all this. Apple must be laughing its head off.

    We need common sense from people with good writing skills to explain what programmers with common sense create.

    Both lacking in MS these days.
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 3:59 PM
  • I think there is a lot of misinformation and assumptions being made about Win7 upgrades.  This is my first-hand experience as it relates to a physical Windows 7 Pro upgrade purchased from Newegg:

    1.  Installing to a clean hard drive, the product key was not accepted at the end of installation.  When entering a blank key and then trying to enter the key within Windows, I received the standard 0xC004F061 error.

    2.  I installed XP Pro (vanilla, no service packs installed) and tried running the Win7 Pro x64 upgrade disk.  Just as conradhedberg noted, THIS DOES NOT WORK, at least not within vanilla XP.  You need to boot from the Win7 CD and choose custom upgrade.

    3.  When booting from the disk, during the custom upgrade, you are not allowed to delete or format the existing XP partition.  These options are greyed out.  You must install over the XP partition, and Win7 setup automatically saves certain XP data to a "windows.old" directory.  I'm guessing it is from here that Win7 gets your existing XP activation info.

    That is just my experience, but I'm doubting a lot of the reports of Win7 Upgrades activating without a prior copy of Windows installed.

    -paul
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 6:54 PM
  • Paul, Funky D,

    Your report doesn't really contradict what others are reporting.  Many say they can't enter the key the first time they install on a clean drive, but they can repeat the install and the key will be accepted.  They say they proceed without the key the first time, it doesn't sound like you tried that.


    Nosmo King,

    You are so right !   
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 7:01 PM