locked
Windows 2008 R2 WSUS v3 migration to Windows 2012 R2 WSUS RRS feed

  • Question

  • We've been using WSUS on Windows 2008 R2 for a long time.  I setup WSUS on a new Windows 2012 R2 server and I checked the list of products I want it to download patches for.  This is list does not include XP and Windows 2003, etc, that were downloaded onto our older WSUS server and I don't want those things brought down to the new WSUS server.

    I know there is a migration method you can follow, but that requires that you copy over all the content and then copy over the database.  I don't want to bring old junk over that isn't necessary and takes up space.  What are the consequences of just pointing clients to the new WSUS server and not migrating everything over?  Or is there a way to migrate settings over, but let the content download fresh from MS and only the newer stuff we need?


    • Edited by JRP76 Wednesday, June 24, 2015 9:55 PM Clarification
    Wednesday, June 24, 2015 8:38 PM

Answers

  • The migration utility referenced here?
    https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee822826(v=ws.10).aspx

    That will migrate everything.

    If you are carefully managing your approvals/declines and clean-ups (WSUS Server Cleanup Wizard), things should be in a fairly good position.

    If you want a very clean migration, and care more about not-having old content than you care about downloading all the needed content from MSFT again, don't migrate, just setup a fresh server and start from scratch.

    Migration means that you carry all your groups and approvals and declines across.

    If you migrate the SUSDB but don't migrate the content (update files), WSUS will need to reconcile all the missing content and re-download it from MSFT. This *might* be one way to keep the DB (which I assume you want to do) without carrying across the XP/WS2003 content, but you'll need to re-download all the other content from MSFT.

    It's probably too complex to try and identify the old content and then split that out to keep only the new/modern content.


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    • Marked as answer by JRP76 Monday, June 29, 2015 1:36 PM
    Wednesday, June 24, 2015 9:40 PM

All replies

  • The migration utility referenced here?
    https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee822826(v=ws.10).aspx

    That will migrate everything.

    If you are carefully managing your approvals/declines and clean-ups (WSUS Server Cleanup Wizard), things should be in a fairly good position.

    If you want a very clean migration, and care more about not-having old content than you care about downloading all the needed content from MSFT again, don't migrate, just setup a fresh server and start from scratch.

    Migration means that you carry all your groups and approvals and declines across.

    If you migrate the SUSDB but don't migrate the content (update files), WSUS will need to reconcile all the missing content and re-download it from MSFT. This *might* be one way to keep the DB (which I assume you want to do) without carrying across the XP/WS2003 content, but you'll need to re-download all the other content from MSFT.

    It's probably too complex to try and identify the old content and then split that out to keep only the new/modern content.


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    • Marked as answer by JRP76 Monday, June 29, 2015 1:36 PM
    Wednesday, June 24, 2015 9:40 PM
  • I guess what I really want to do is migrate all the groups, approvals and records of which machines have what patches but NOT migrate over all the content that is old.  It sounds like this is not very feasible?  Using the cleanup doesn't seem to work very well from my experience.  I unchecked all the XP and Windows 2003 stuff and ran cleanup, but it hardly removed anything or cleared up any space in the content folder.


    I've read so many articles on how to try and cleanup the content folder of old updates, but I never find anything that really works.  Is there a working and tested method to remove all Windows XP/2000/2003 updates as well as older Office updates and delete their files from the content folder?
    • Edited by JRP76 Thursday, June 25, 2015 3:38 PM Adding comments
    Thursday, June 25, 2015 2:04 PM
  • I unchecked all the XP and Windows 2003 stuff and ran cleanup, but it hardly removed anything or cleared up any space in the content folder.

    "unchecked"??? Do you mean, you went into products & classifications, and removed the check-mark from XP and 03 in there?

    If so, that only stops your WSUS from synchronising *new* metadata/content; it takes no action whatsoever upon existing metadata/content.

    To get cleanup to do anything useful, you must tightly manage your approvals/declines - this means that you don't leave anything in an unapproved status  - you also need to be tightly managing your superseded/expired etc.

    If an update is at unapproved or approved status - it cannot/will not be cleaned up - to be cleaned up it must be declined.

    It probably less effort for you to backup/migrate the database only, de-select the unwanted products/classifications at the new server and then re-download all the content at the new server.

    Before you do that, sort out all your supersede/decline + old_products/decline + will_never_deploy_that/decline, then cleanup your old db


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    Thursday, June 25, 2015 9:49 PM
  • I am just going to start from scratch on the new WSUS server and re-approve and re-download the needed updates moving forward.  I wish there was a better way to do this.

    Moving forward, I'd like to manage WSUS so that the content store doesn't hold onto old updates that are no longer necessary.  How can I do this other than going back and setting old updates to "decline"?  Don't updates that are superseded automatically clean themselves out with WSUS and the server cleanup?

    Can you expand on this statement you made and how I would do this?

    "To get cleanup to do anything useful, you must tightly manage your approvals/declines - this means that you don't leave anything in an unapproved status  - you also need to be tightly managing your superseded/expired etc."

    Thanks for your help on this.

    Friday, June 26, 2015 5:51 PM
  • Have a read of this thread, and maybe do a search within the WSUS forum for the phrase: superseded decline

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/b02c04ef-a8ae-4568-aaff-fe182e854b29/wsus-declining-superseded-updates?forum=winserverwsus

    SCW won't cleanup if there is an approval, regardless of superseded status.

    Lawrence wrote many responses and articles/blogs over time on the topics, well worth reading on


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    Friday, June 26, 2015 10:15 PM
  • Wow.  How complicated does WSUS need to be and how confusing certain language used in the SCW is. 

    Thanks for your responses.  I think starting from scratch is the easiest way to migrate to a new server if you don't want to bring old junk over.  It will take some time initially to approve updates again, but you practically need to be a WSUS developer to know how to truly clean the server up before migrating to a new server if that's the route you choose to go.

    Monday, June 29, 2015 1:35 PM