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Windows 7 (SP1 - that's right...) and the war against productivity - 30 sec delay for that 1st logon RRS feed

  • Question

  • Staff used to a 10-15 second  logon with Windows XP (32 bit) are quite dismayed with the 30 second + delay to logon to the new Windows 7 (SP1, I repeat, SP1) 64 bit desktops and laptops we are gradually deploying.

    Important fact: once a user has logged on, and the profile created, subsequent logons take a mere 3-5 seconds. This is a consistent result, tested over and over again.

    Wait! Did you read the previous sentence? Does that lead you to conclude it's something with the firewall, our switches, Active Directory or global warming?

    OK then.

    Problem is, users will work on different computers in the course of the day and do not always end up with a computer on which their profile has already been created.

    Moreover, client machines are re-imaged from time to time, so users have to create their profile all over again...

    I have tested this over and over again and the results are the same. In my latest tests, I used two computers:

    Windows 7 SP1 (64 bit) machine specs:

    Dual Core CPU E5400@2.7 GHz

    2 GB RAM

    7200 RPM SATA HD

    --------

    XP SP3 machine specs:

    Core 2 Duo

    E8200 @ 2.66 GHz

    2 GB RAM

    7200 RPM SATA HD

     

    These two computers are connected to the same Netgear Prosafe FS116 switch.

    There are two more switches between these clients and our two domain controllers.

    We encountered the problem when both DCs were running W2K3 SP2.

    We still do after one of the two has been upgraded to W2K8 R2 SP1.

    We are a single domain, single site organization. One LAN, one subnet.

     

    Here are the abbreviations of 4 test users followed by logon time for W7 SP1 (SP1 once again) and XP SP3:

    SH 30-32 seconds on W7 vs. 14-15 seconds on XP

    AR 30-32 seconds on W7 vs. 14-15 seconds on XP

    SM 30-32 seconds on W7 vs. 14-15 seconds on XP

    SG 30-32 seconds on W7 vs. 14-15 seconds on XP

     

    Logon duration is measured from time user clicks OK (or clicks on arrow) and the time the hourglass/ring stops spinning and the users can start working.

    Multiply the extra 15 seconds by the number of times users log on in the course of the year and you'll begin to grasp the waste of time.

    Yes, Group Policy is applied to these machines and users (but the same policies).

    Yes, users do connect to one network "home" folder - their own. Once again, this does not change between XP and W7.

    No, there is no WMI filtering based on OS going on.


    Monday, October 3, 2011 4:04 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    As I know, this is by design. Windows XP and Windows 7 have different builds and we would see such differences.

     

    There is a way to keep tracing running across reboots: AutoLogger in tracelog.exe

     

    Also, you may refer to the following suggestions to check:

     

    1. Within Active Directory, create an OU and set it to “Block policy inheritance” Move the computer as well as the user into this test OU and then reboot the computer and test to see if there is any change in login time.

     

    2. On a test computer, Within Local Users and Computers create a New Test User (Local user account). Once created disconnect the computer from the network and reboot and log onto the local computer with the Test User account to the local computer.

     

    3. If login delay is local to the computer we can use the System Configuration Utility (MSCONFIG) to disable third party services and startup items or set to diagnostic startup and disable all and then reboot the computer and log on with a new user.

     

    929135  How to troubleshoot a problem by performing a clean boot in Windows Vista or in Windows 7

     

    Regards,

     

    Sabrina


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    Wednesday, October 5, 2011 6:20 AM
  • Thank you for the suggestions. Very busy with other matters right now but will try ASAP.
    Thursday, October 6, 2011 9:40 PM
  • This might not be correct. But surely if the user hasn't logged onto x machine before it has to create local files/folders settings upon first login. The same as if you create an account locally and login for the first time.
    The answers/solutions that I provide are from personal experience. They are as is and come with no warranty.
    Friday, October 7, 2011 11:28 AM
  • Some people would be grateful for a 30 second login.  You can try disabling all the ineffecient 'active setup\installed components' stuff in autoruns logon tab, but one of them sets up the aero theme.

     

    • Edited by JS2010 Friday, October 7, 2011 2:53 PM
    Friday, October 7, 2011 2:46 PM
  • I've tried the solutions proposed by Sabrina Shen above:

    1. Within Active Directory, create an OU and set it to “Block policy inheritance” Move the computer as well as the user into this test OU and then reboot the computer and test to see if there is any change in login time.

    There is no change in login time - still around 30 + seconds.

    2. On a test computer, Within Local Users and Computers create a New Test User (Local user account). Once created disconnect the computer from the network and reboot and log onto the local computer with the Test User account to the local computer.

    Login time is a little shorter: around 20 seconds.

     

    I have enabled verbose logging and in either case (login to Active Directory network or local login and authentication) "Preparing Desktop" takes the longest.

    I've time logins that are just short of 40 seconds (perhaps a bit longer because of logging?) and:

    10 seconds for everything that precedes "Preparing your Desktop" (Folder Redirection for example)

    30 seconds for "Preparing your Desktop"

    So... it does not appear to be an issue with AD authentication, folder redirection, or anything else other than setting up the profile / desktop.

     

     

    As for Autologger, I do not see how it applies here:

     An autologger session is the preferred method for tracing the activity of a driver or other trace provider during system boot. 

     The problem occurs during user login, not during system boot. The system could be booted hours before and the problem still occurs.

     

     

    Sunday, October 16, 2011 10:09 PM
  • How to enable user environment debug logging

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/221833

     

    Monday, October 17, 2011 3:16 PM
  • Have you found any fix to your problem? We are experiencing the same slowness on "Preparing your desktop".

    Friday, December 16, 2011 6:57 PM
  • Instead of clearing the profile via a GPO setting, we just leave it alone now.

    We do clear the IE temp folder when IE closes though.

    Since the long logon was only an issue for the initial logon, as users logon to the computers in question, and establish profiles, with time, most of them have one on the machine and ensuing logons take much less time.

    We can re-image the machines if we want to clean everything off.

    Friday, December 16, 2011 7:02 PM
  • Is the login immediately after a reboot?  Starting windows services can slow a login with their i/o.  If you know about xperf, you can look for places where the hard drive utilitazion is 100%.

     

    Friday, December 16, 2011 7:03 PM
  • No not necessarily.  Its basically the first time a user logs onto a system.  After that its fast as Le Pivert was saying - under 10 seconds. The "Preparing Desktop" hangs for approx 20-30 seconds on the first login.

    I saw some patches out there, but they dont apply to SP1.

    Friday, December 16, 2011 7:21 PM
  • Hi,

    I've been stuggling with this one on my network and after much GPO debugging found that this WMI fixed resolved my slowness. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2617858 . Give it a go and please vote as help ful if it is ;o)

    Thanks,

    John

    • Proposed as answer by John Grenfell Friday, April 27, 2012 1:01 PM
    Friday, April 27, 2012 1:01 PM
  • Hi,

    It sounds like you might be suffering from one of the common issues with Windows 7 Service Pack 1 that I have encountered.

    Group Policy Processing can be directly responsible for slow Login, hotfixes exist for Gpapi.dll (Group Policy Client API), Gpsvc.dll (Group Policy Client) and Gpprefcl.dll (Group Policy Preference Client) to reduce logon performance issues.

    If you wish to find the latest version of these three files then please feel free to check out the links to my blog below, I try and update posts as new hotfixes become available so these are all very current and apply to Windows 7 with Service Pack 1.

    http://aidinit.com/2012/04/gpapi-dll-pre-service-pack-2-revision-history-for-windows-server-2008-r2-sp1-and-windows-small-business-server-2011-sbs-2011/

    http://aidinit.com/2012/04/gpsvc-dll-pre-service-pack-2-revision-history-for-windows-server-2008-r2-sp1-windows-7-sp1-and-windows-small-business-server-2011-sbs-2011/

    http://aidinit.com/2012/04/gpprefcl-dll-pre-service-pack-2-revision-history-for-windows-server-2008-r2-sp1-and-windows-small-business-server-2011-sbs-2011/

    Generally speaking if you apply the latest hotfix (Most recent date and highest File Version) then it will include all the previosuly documented fixes.  I would suggest testing these on one machine first and then see how much of an improvement you achieve.

    One last hotfix that you may find useful is for svchost.exe, this directly affects the startup performance of Windows 7 with Service Pack 1.

    http://aidinit.com/2012/04/svchost-exe-pre-service-pack-2-revision-history-for-windows-server-2008-r2-sp1-windows-7-sp1-and-windows-small-business-server-2011-sbs-2011/

    Hope this info helps.

    Stuart

    • Proposed as answer by Stuart Davey Saturday, April 28, 2012 10:47 AM
    Saturday, April 28, 2012 10:47 AM
  • I ended up unchecking the 'active setup' (this should be obsoleted) registry entries through autoruns, to optimize a new user login.  I had to put a registry entry back in to set the wallpaper.  And my Default profile is under 40 megs.

    Saturday, April 28, 2012 12:59 PM