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Level of Effort and Hours RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have an LOE task set up with 400h spread out with 40h per week.  Each week, we schedule forward the unworked hours (update project, schedule remaining work to occur after status date) which gives us a spike of hours up front.  What we want is for the unworked hours to just drop off each week. Is there a way to do that? Should we just filter out the LOE tasks before scheduling forward?  Wouldn't that leave remaining work in the past?

    What's best practice here?

    Thursday, May 19, 2016 1:46 PM

All replies

  • Kevin,

    Normally for LOE (Level of Effort) tasks, statusing is of the simplest form, you use Update Project and update work through to the status date. There is no rescheduling of work because for an LOE task, credit is taken whether a resource actually has actual hours on the task or not. Metrically speaking SPI is always 1 and CPI is always 1. That's one reason LOE can be a little dangerous because actual cost can be accrued even though no resource worked on the task.

    John

    Thursday, May 19, 2016 3:15 PM
  • Agreed!  It does get dangerous, just as you said.  We're tracking actuals in the schedule.  So if the scheduled work was 40h, but they only worked 30h last week, what happens to the 10h not completed when I update project?  I think that's where I'm hitting my speed bump.  From what I understand, we claim 40h regardless of what was actually worked.  That's an EV nightmare for us on Gov't jobs.  Correct?
    Thursday, May 19, 2016 3:24 PM
  • Kevin,

    For an LOE task you do not enter any actual work values, you strictly update project to the status date. So what happens to the 10h? Boom! It's gone.

    Classical earned value (what the US Government uses) can indeed be precarious in my opinion but the bigger problem is with LOE tasks for just the reason I cited. However, in my experience the use of LOE was frowned upon and if used at all should be for very few and specific tasks defy any meaningful measurement of activity (e.g. occasional support).

    John

    Thursday, May 19, 2016 4:47 PM