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Upgrade from 32-bit Vista to 64-bit Windows 7 ok? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Will it be ok to upgrade from 32-bit Vista to 64-bit Windows 7? I got a Lenovo IdeaPad Y530 in March and it has 32-bit Vista on it. I want to purchase 
    Windows 7 during the pre-release sale that starts tomorrow, but I was going to maybe get the 64-bit version to try and squeeze some more performance
    out of my laptop?

    I will see a performance increase correct? Or should I just stick with the 32 bit version for better compatibility?

    (Note: I had to keep trying to edit this post because my changes I was making were not showing up for some reason.)




    Intel Pentium 4 @ 3Ghz, 2GB DDR Ram, Nvidia 7600GS - AGP type.
    Friday, June 26, 2009 1:42 AM

Answers

  • There is no in place upgrade from any 32 bit version of Windows to a 64 bit version. You can only do a clean install. You can use an upgrade SKU but during the install you will lose all your programs. You will need to backup your data, install the 64 bit version, install your programs, then restore your data.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    • Marked as answer by Nick FV Friday, June 26, 2009 3:50 AM
    Friday, June 26, 2009 3:44 AM

All replies

  • There is no in place upgrade from any 32 bit version of Windows to a 64 bit version. You can only do a clean install. You can use an upgrade SKU but during the install you will lose all your programs. You will need to backup your data, install the 64 bit version, install your programs, then restore your data.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    • Marked as answer by Nick FV Friday, June 26, 2009 3:50 AM
    Friday, June 26, 2009 3:44 AM
  • There is no in place upgrade from any 32 bit version of Windows to a 64 bit version. You can only do a clean install. You can use an upgrade SKU but during the install you will lose all your programs. You will need to backup your data, install the 64 bit version, install your programs, then restore your data.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Ok, that's fine if I have to do a clean install to go from the 32-bit version of Vista to the 64-bit version of Windows 7.  Should I see a performance enhancement using the 64-bit 
    version of Windows 7 over the 32-bit version?

    Also, when we use the Windows 7 upgrade DVD do we need our Vista DVD or just the Key number?  If not for the initial use while Vista is still on the computer, what about some
    time in the future when we want to do a clean re-installation of Windows 7 with our upgrade DVD...will we need the Vista DVD then, or will just the key suffice?

    Intel Pentium 4 @ 3Ghz, 2GB DDR Ram, Nvidia 7600GS - AGP type.
    Friday, June 26, 2009 3:51 AM
  • I recommend 64 bit OS'. That said unless you install a lot of RAM (greater than 4GB) you won't see a noticable difference.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Friday, June 26, 2009 5:20 AM
  • It should be added that 64-bit systems in general have a higher level of stability than 32-bit systems.
    Mobile AMD64 3000+, VIA Apollo K8T800 chipset, 1 G RAM, ATIRadeonMobility 9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Friday, June 26, 2009 7:49 AM
  • This is simply not true. Do you have some data to back up your statement? There are many reasons why I prefer 64 bit OS'. Better stability isn't one of them. 32 and 64 bit Windows are equally stable if the drivers and programs you use are equally bug free. System stability comes down to several things the most important being the quality of the hardware, then the quality of the drivers, then the quality of the programs. 32 bit vs 64 bit has nothing to do with it. Neither is inherently more stable.

    I think 64 bit is the future. I don't install 32 bit OS' on any of my computers anymore. I recommend 64 bit. The only real reason why is the ability to address more RAM. Every current OS I've tried works better with more RAM. RAM is relatively inexpensive compared to other things you can upgrade. To go from a 32 bit OS to a 64 bit OS requires a clean install which can be a major pain if you have a lot of programs to reinstall. Thus I recommend everyone start out with a 64 bit OS. If you have a 32 bit OS and are using less than 4GB of RAM you will not see any noticable performance or stability improvements by simply switching to a 64 bit OS. That's the facts. Anything else is FUD.


    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Friday, June 26, 2009 1:12 PM
  • I agree, I installed 64 bit version Windows 7 RC and Installed 6 gigs of memory, And what A difference ! I'am really impressed !.

    Carl DeBusschere
    Friday, June 26, 2009 2:15 PM
  • Everyone has his own experiences. You have "the facts"? I could quote dozens of posts that claim higher stability was their main reason to stay with x64 (less errors, less crashes), even if the performance gain was only decent. Others see big improvements in speed and responsiveness, only minor differences in stability. Ones claim less than 4 GB of RAM would make the x86/x64 difference disappear, others report that the increase in both stability and performance is tremendous even with only 1 or 2 GB of RAM... Why should I decide who is nearer to the truth?
    That all said, I would go with x64. It will become "mainstream", anyway. If you remember, a few years ago, 64-bit support was only given to the high-end versions of Windows, now it's integrated in all versions from the beginning (each package contains a 32bit and a 64bit variant).


    Mobile AMD64 3000+, VIA Apollo K8T800 chipset, 1 G RAM, ATIRadeonMobility 9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Friday, June 26, 2009 2:38 PM
  • Anecdotal evidence is not facts. I could point to just as many posts about systems that experience problems after changing to 64 bit Windows. I stand by my statement that 64 bit Windows is not inherently more stable than 32 bit Windows. Stability will vary greatly between systems, mostly depending on the quality of the drivers. Some systems may be more stable with 64 bit, some with 32 bit.

    I'm not trying to start an argument. We agree that 64 bit is the way to go. This is becoming like the Windows vs Linux arguments, filled with FUD on both sides. I'm against FUD period. It doesn't help to win an argument by making statements that can easily be disproved. The one thing that's easy to prove is that 64 bit Windows can directly address more RAM than 32 bit Windows. This is a fact. This fact is a good reason why people should be using 64 bit Windows. Other things like system stablility, performance increases, etc. vary greatly between systems. No one can absolutely say this system will perform better or be more stable with 64 bit Windows. That would be an opinion.

    I don't want this to degenerate into "yes it is", "no it isn't" argument. Unless someone can point out a statistically valid study that shows 64 bit Windows is more stable than 32 bit Windows I won't answer any more posts in this thread.
    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Friday, June 26, 2009 3:03 PM
  • I have the same question and see most of it answered in this thread, but anybody know the answer to this part below?:

    "Also, when we use the Windows 7 upgrade DVD do we need our Vista DVD or just the Key number?  If not for the initial use while Vista is still on the computer, what about some
    time in the future when we want to do a clean re-installation of Windows 7 with our upgrade DVD...will we need the Vista DVD then, or will just the key suffice?"

    Friday, August 21, 2009 9:51 PM
  • I have the same question and see most of it answered in this thread, but anybody know the answer to this part below?:

    "Also, when we use the Windows 7 upgrade DVD do we need our Vista DVD or just the Key number?  If not for the initial use while Vista is still on the computer, what about some
    time in the future when we want to do a clean re-installation of Windows 7 with our upgrade DVD...will we need the Vista DVD then, or will just the key suffice?"


    I have the same Question. Do I need to spend the extra $90 or will the upgrade install a clean version without Vista?  Vista will be gone as soon as W-7 sets up the new OS at 64.
    Saturday, August 22, 2009 1:31 AM
  • The upgrade will only start if it sees an installed, qualifying OS. Once it starts you can format the partition the OS is on and do a clean install.
    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Saturday, August 22, 2009 3:25 AM
  • What is the procedure if I need to reinstall windows 7 someday? Am I forced to install Vista first? Thanks in advance
    Saturday, August 22, 2009 11:44 AM

  • Kerry_BrownMVPUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
     Answer
    Vote As Helpful
    There is no in place upgrade from any 32 bit version of Windows to a 64 bit version. You can only do a clean install. You can use an upgrade SKU but during the install you will lose all your programs. You will need to backup your data, install the 64 bit version, install your programs, then restore your data.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience


    LOL!   Kerry, if the mods had their way, I'd get  -1 votes  too !

    Saturday, August 22, 2009 2:25 PM
  • Yes, you would need to reinstall a qualifying OS first.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    • Proposed as answer by Gene_2 Saturday, August 22, 2009 5:39 PM
    Saturday, August 22, 2009 3:56 PM
  • I'm not a fan of the whole voting/tagging/rating thing. It's a lot of work for the moderators and so far I haven't seen any benefit to the forum users.
    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Saturday, August 22, 2009 3:58 PM

  • I'll delete my post above shortly.  No disrespect intended.  That forum bug is funny.   :))

    Saturday, August 22, 2009 4:07 PM
  • It is a funny bug but I was serious. I am not a fan of rating and voting. It can become a popularity contest. It can actually interfere with people getting the best answer.
    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Saturday, August 22, 2009 4:10 PM

  • I can't delete these posts of mine now without causing yours to be out-of-context.  Shall I delete mine, or leave it?  (snicker)

    btw - I agree with you.

    Saturday, August 22, 2009 4:13 PM
  • I'd leave it. If the comments are out of line the moderators will delete them.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Saturday, August 22, 2009 4:15 PM

  • I am familiar with that.

    Saturday, August 22, 2009 4:16 PM
  • Yes, you would need to reinstall a qualifying OS first.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience

    Thank you Kerry for your answer!
    Saturday, August 22, 2009 5:39 PM
  • I'm planning on upgrading from xp 32 to 7 64. It's good to know that I can save quite a bit of money on the upgrade version. Besides I have to do a clean install anyway. Thanks.
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 11:45 PM
  • Ok.  So what is a "Clean Install"? is there an instructional page.  I have 32bit Vista Home Prem and bought the Windows 7 and did a 32 bit install.  Can I change all this to 64bit Windows 7 install? Do I have to load drivers for all my hardware, like optical drives, sound cards ect?
    Saturday, January 30, 2010 4:00 PM
  • 'ElNino7',

    Ok, here's the answer as simply put as possible...

    Generally when the word 'upgrade' is used in the context it means an "In-place" upgrade.  New OS disc goes in, "Upgrade" is selected & therorically everything is kept intact & the OS gets changed.  This method can be used w/ some paths but, not others.  When it cannot be used a "Clean Install" must be done.

    Cleans wipe everything & give a fresh, new install... in this scenario data from the previous OS (if there is one) must be saved for transfer.  Programs, apps, software must be reloaded.

    Even when supported paths are involved a clean install is the more recommended approach... seems sometimes problems follow in-place upgrades.

    To do a clean install the choice "Custom Install" is selected from the Win7 disc.  The methodology for doing this w/ a 'Upgrade' disc is not very complex, @ all.

    IF, your hardware supports a 64-bit platform the only way 32 can be changed to 64 is by a clean install.  Going cross-platform is one of those "Unsupported Paths", cannot be done as an Upgrade.  So, yes, 32 can, in effect, be changed to 64 but, by a clean/"Custom" install.

    Regarding M/B drivers afterwards, likely W7 will find them all, if not, no big deal to deal w/ anything missing.  As stated above, data must be saved & put back... Programs & apps will need re-installing.

    Get back to me if you want more details or anything.

    Thanks.
    Drew - MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues
    • Proposed as answer by Drew1903 Saturday, January 30, 2010 7:28 PM
    Saturday, January 30, 2010 7:27 PM
  • Given the advice above, what I would like to do is a clean install onto a fresh hard disk, so I can keep my old Vista available to help with locating and migrating my programs.  Is that possible, and if so what are the recommended steps?  Will this work with an upgrade version?  I guess I could reinstall Vista or XP onto the fresh disk (I still have both) and then custom install over that.  Just not sure whether the Windows 7 install procedure gives you contorl over where the installation is placed.
    Thursday, February 18, 2010 11:29 PM
  • In order to do that you'd have to use a full license not an upgrade license. When you use an upgrade license the OS that qualifies you for the upgrade no longer has a license as long as the upgrade is installed. In order to legally use the older OS you'd have to uninstall the newer OS.

    With a full license it's easy. Boot from the DVD and make sure you install to the correct partition. Windows 7 will automatically set up a dual boot. Give the Vista partition a name before you start the Windows 7 install. The drive letters will be different depending which OS you boot to. If you name the partitions it'll be obvious which is which.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Friday, February 19, 2010 3:31 AM
  • Unless someone can point out a statistically valid study that shows 64 bit Windows is more stable than 32 bit Windows I won't answer any more posts in this thread. Kerry Brown MS-MVP
    You demanded "data to back up your statement."  Do you have "a statistically valid study that shows 64 bit Windows is no more stable than 32 bit Windows"?

    If not, then it appears you're just being a bully.
    Saturday, April 24, 2010 6:09 PM
  • I dont know how to do NEGATIVE votes, but I think this reply is horrible. There is so much good information here, but there is aloways a troublemaker in every crowd. Kerry, thanks for your EXPERT advice.
    Tuesday, July 20, 2010 4:00 PM
  • Agree 100%.  Should not have such distractions taking up space; be it this 'thread' or others in this forum... should not have to endure it anywhere.
    Drew - MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues
    Tuesday, July 20, 2010 5:38 PM
  • You demanded "data to back up your statement."  Do you have "a statistically valid study that shows 64 bit Windows is no more stable than 32 bit Windows"?
     If not, then it appears you're just being a bully.

    Since there has not been any valid statistical study or data provided to back up either claim, then Kerry isn't wrong for saying that there is no evidence to support the claim that 64bit systems are more stable. Also Kerry has at least backed up his opinion with actual reasons that were not refuted. The reasons for the claim that 64bit systems were more stable is refutable since it is true that it was anecdotal evidence.

    I haven't said all that to prove that 64bit systems are more stable or not. I really don't know. I bring this up because I don't think Kerry was being a bully. I think he was just trying to be as helpful as possible while keeping the answer free from perceived misinformation. I thought he also did this while trying to keep everything on topic.

    Saturday, August 20, 2011 12:09 AM
  • Thank you!  Such comments as "If not, then it appears you're just being a bully." are definately not appropiate & have no place in this Forum.
    Drew MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues Pres. Computer Issues www.drewsci.com
    Saturday, August 20, 2011 1:45 AM