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GPO to deploy software

    Question

  • I am looking to deploy some new software to all the PC’s on our network. We currently have 14 offices, each office has a DC  / FP Server. We Run XP / Vista / Win 7 clients, the software comes in 3 Flavours XP, Win7+ 32bit,Win7+ 64bit. Rather than deploying the software from 1 central server I was looking to copy the software to a local folder on each of the offices DC's  and have the GPO deploy it from there when the user logs in.  

    I thought I could get away with 3 GPO’s one for each software version and use WMI to deploy the software to the relevant OS’s. However I cannot see a way to deploy the software unless I have 42 GPO’s 14 offices x 3 different GPO’s. I thought I may have been able to use the %logonserver% in  Computer Configuration> Policies> Software Settings > Software installation but it appears I have to specify the actual server.

    Does Anyone got any idea how I can get around this, or have a better solution.

    Monday, February 02, 2015 10:39 AM

Answers

  • > server I was looking to copy the software to a local folder on each of
    > the offices DC's and have the GPO deploy it from there when the user
    > logs in.
     
    Create a DFS namespace and a folder that has targets on all your
    servers. Use this DFS path as an installation source and all will go
    smoothly.
     
    > I thought I could get away with 3 GPO’s one for each software version
    > and use WMI to deploy the software to the relevant OS’s. However I
     
    Yes, 3 GPOs is the correct number. Use WMI to distinguish OS versions.
     
    > cannot see a way to deploy the software unless I have 42 GPO’s 14
     
    No - you'd only need 42 GPOs if you do NOT use DFS :)
     
    > %logonserver% in*Computer Configuration> Policies> Software Settings
     
    %logonserver% is not available in computer context anyway.
     

    Martin

    Mal ein GUTES Buch über GPOs lesen?

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment :))
    Monday, February 02, 2015 12:07 PM
  • > I am considering doing a GPO to set a environment variable unique to
    > each site. Then use that variable to build a path to the distribution
    > point. Initially you would still end up with a slew of GPOs but the
    > variable would be reusable for other uses. In my case we have structured
     
    As long as you have "some" relation between Site names and server names,
    you can grab "DynamicSiteName" from the registry (services\netlogon) and
    create an environment variable for this through GPP Environment and Item
    Level Targeting :)
     
    Anyway: If you properly configure Sites and Services (including site
    link costs), DFS _will_ pick the closest server.
     

    Martin

    Mal ein GUTES Buch über GPOs lesen?

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment :))
    Tuesday, February 03, 2015 9:46 AM

All replies

  • > server I was looking to copy the software to a local folder on each of
    > the offices DC's and have the GPO deploy it from there when the user
    > logs in.
     
    Create a DFS namespace and a folder that has targets on all your
    servers. Use this DFS path as an installation source and all will go
    smoothly.
     
    > I thought I could get away with 3 GPO’s one for each software version
    > and use WMI to deploy the software to the relevant OS’s. However I
     
    Yes, 3 GPOs is the correct number. Use WMI to distinguish OS versions.
     
    > cannot see a way to deploy the software unless I have 42 GPO’s 14
     
    No - you'd only need 42 GPOs if you do NOT use DFS :)
     
    > %logonserver% in*Computer Configuration> Policies> Software Settings
     
    %logonserver% is not available in computer context anyway.
     

    Martin

    Mal ein GUTES Buch über GPOs lesen?

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment :))
    Monday, February 02, 2015 12:07 PM
  • Looking for a similar solution myself. DFS was my first thought as well. My concern with using a DFS path is that there is no guarantee that the package will be pulled from the most local source. The packages I need to deploy are too large to effectively move across WAN connections. They would saturate my links in no time.  

    I am considering doing a GPO to set a environment variable unique to each site. Then use that variable to build a path to the distribution point. Initially you would still end up with a slew of GPOs but the variable would be reusable for other uses. In my case we have structured servers names and substituting a variable for part of the server names works fairly well.  If I can get that to work it should reduce the number of GPOs needed for each deployment. 

    I am interested in what solution you decide on. Like you I really dont want to build and maintain 50 GPOs for a single software deployment. 

    Monday, February 02, 2015 9:39 PM
  • > I am considering doing a GPO to set a environment variable unique to
    > each site. Then use that variable to build a path to the distribution
    > point. Initially you would still end up with a slew of GPOs but the
    > variable would be reusable for other uses. In my case we have structured
     
    As long as you have "some" relation between Site names and server names,
    you can grab "DynamicSiteName" from the registry (services\netlogon) and
    create an environment variable for this through GPP Environment and Item
    Level Targeting :)
     
    Anyway: If you properly configure Sites and Services (including site
    link costs), DFS _will_ pick the closest server.
     

    Martin

    Mal ein GUTES Buch über GPOs lesen?

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment :))
    Tuesday, February 03, 2015 9:46 AM