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Server 2016 Hyper-V: VMs Not Booting After Previously Working

    Question

  • I'm running Hyper-V on Server 2016 Datacenter, at home. I've created a number of Windows 10 VMs, both Pro and Enterprise. While I was creating these VMs, I didn't run into any problems. I was able to boot into the OS, log into the computer, and configure it as normally. However, for each one of these VMs, at some point when I tried to start the VM, I would run into SEVERE slow down issues. Often times I couldn't get to the log on screen again. It would simply sit at the black screen with the Hyper-V logo, while the spinning dots would go on spinning endlessly. This is a recent issue. Within the past week. I didn't previously have this problem, but I also haven't been using Hyper-V heavily on this install until recently. My OS is fully updated (which hopefully isn't the problem...).

    I have made no absolutely no hardware changes and no changes to the configuration of the VMs. Usually after, restarting my computer of the VMs a few times, this issue would show up and the VM s would become unusable. Again, these VMs initially worked just fine. They started up quickly and were very responsive.

    I've tried creating new VMs, using different ISOs, and even uninstalling and reinstalling the Hyper-V module and management tools. All with no luck. I would really like to avoid reinstalling my host OS if that could be helped, but right now that's all I can think of, though I have no idea if that would even work since I don't have a clue where the problem lies. Below my hardware and VM configuration is listed below. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    ----------

    OS Name                       Microsoft Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
    Version                       10.0.14393 Build 14393
    System Type               x64-based PC
    Processor                       Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2600K CPU @ 3.40GHz, 3401 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 8 Logical Processor(s)
    BIOS Version/Date       American Megatrends Inc. 0301, 9/16/2011
    SMBIOS Version               2.6
    BIOS Mode               Legacy
    BaseBoard Manufacturer   ASUSTeK Computer INC.
    Platform Role               Workstation
    Secure Boot State       Unsupported
    Installed Physical             Memory (RAM)   16.0 GB DDR3
    Total Virtual Memory       18.3 GB
    Available Virtual Memory  12.5 GB
    Page File Space               2.38 GB

    C Drive:                          Boot Drive
    Model                       INTEL SSDSA2CW120G3 (SATA SSD)
    Bytes/Sector               512
    Size                               111.79 GB (120,031,511,040 bytes)
    Free Space               44.94 GB (48,249,929,728 bytes)

    D Drive:       Location of the VMs/VHDXs
    Model       ST2000DL003-9VT166 (SATA HDD)
    Bytes/Sector       512
    Size       1.82 TB (2,000,396,321,280 bytes)
    Free Space               746.33 GB (801,364,180,992 bytes)

    Virtual Machines:
    Type                               Hyper-V Version 2016 Generation 2
    Storage                           VHDX Dynamic
    Startup                           Memory 4GB (non-Dynamic)
    Virtual Processors            1
    OS                                 Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise


    Tuesday, June 11, 2019 4:01 AM

Answers

  • Hello Leon,

    Thanks for your reply. I've examined all the Hyper-V Logs. I've recreated the issue and read through anything that came up. The logs are reporting successful events. This is not surprising to me considering that I can still access the VMs, but only with EXTREME lag.

    However, your suggestion was indeed helpful for a different reason. After examining the logs and confirming that Hyper-V wasn't the issue, I started to re-evaluate what I thought could be the problem, and I realized it could be storage based. I copied my VMs from my D Drive (HDD) to my C Drive (SSD). Once I did that they started to work perfectly. I then re-examined the logs and looked for storage events. Under Applications and Service Logs -> Microsoft -> WIndows -> StorDiag, I found a long list of errors. Specifically StorDiag EventID  504, which I've copied below. I'm not exactly sure what it means, but after discovering this, I attempted to copy a large file back to the D Drive and discovered absolutely horrible write times. This seems to be the problem. Now I have to figure out the cause (if you know what this is, I'd love to hear from you). 

    I don't know the protocol on this forum is, but I'll mark this as solved and open up a new thread if I can't figure it out.

    Thanks for your help,

    Stan

    ----------------

    Log Name:      Microsoft-Windows-Storage-ClassPnP/Operational
    Source:        Microsoft-Windows-StorDiag
    Date:          6/12/2019 00:53:30
    Event ID:      504
    Task Category: Class
    Level:         Error
    Keywords:      Device I/O control request
    User:          computer\Administrator
    Computer:      my.computer.net
    Description:
    Completing a failed IOCTL request.
    Event Xml:
    <Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
      <System>
        <Provider Name="Microsoft-Windows-StorDiag" Guid="{F5D05B38-80A6-4653-825D-C414E4AB3C68}" />
        <EventID>504</EventID>
        <Version>1</Version>
        <Level>2</Level>
        <Task>200</Task>
        <Opcode>101</Opcode>
        <Keywords>0x800000040000000</Keywords>
        <TimeCreated SystemTime="2019-06-12T04:53:30.284022800Z" />
        <EventRecordID>997253</EventRecordID>
        <Correlation />
        <Execution ProcessID="1784" ThreadID="2336" />
        <Channel>Microsoft-Windows-Storage-ClassPnP/Operational</Channel>
        <Computer>my.computer.net</Computer>
        <Security UserID="S-1-5-21-4150441485-2800377868-2508223801-500" />
      </System>
      <EventData>
        <Data Name="DeviceGUID">{D393DD4A-6271-DA94-0AA1-DD1DE3F36251}</Data>
        <Data Name="DeviceNumber">0</Data>
        <Data Name="Vendor">NULL</Data>
        <Data Name="Model">ST2000DL003-9VT166</Data>
        <Data Name="FirmwareVersion">CC32</Data>
        <Data Name="SerialNumber">            6YD0GE9Q</Data>
        <Data Name="IrpStatus">0x80000011</Data>
        <Data Name="IoctlControlCode">0x7c088</Data>
      </EventData>
    </Event> 
    • Marked as answer by Stan Joseph Wednesday, June 12, 2019 5:14 AM
    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 5:13 AM

All replies

  • Hello Stan,

    I noticed you are using a normal workstation for running Windows Server 2016, while it "may" work, it might not be something that has been certified by either Microsoft or Intel. This means that you "may" or "may not" encounter issues, it's difficult to know exactly.

    You can verify if the hardware you're using is certified on the following page:
    www.windowsservercatalog.com

    Intel does however provide support for many desktop CPUs for Windows Server operating system, however from what I could see in the Windows Server Catalog, Intel 4th Gen i7 CPUs and newer are certified for Windows Server 2016.

    Please also review the Windows Server 2016 system requirements:
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/get-started/system-requirements


    If you want to start troubleshooting though, I suggest you start by looking in to the Hyper-V event logs for any clues. You have ten (10) different Hyper-V event logs, more information about the logs over here:
    Looking at the Hyper-V Event Log

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Tuesday, June 11, 2019 7:04 AM
  • Hello Leon,

    Thanks for your reply. I've examined all the Hyper-V Logs. I've recreated the issue and read through anything that came up. The logs are reporting successful events. This is not surprising to me considering that I can still access the VMs, but only with EXTREME lag.

    However, your suggestion was indeed helpful for a different reason. After examining the logs and confirming that Hyper-V wasn't the issue, I started to re-evaluate what I thought could be the problem, and I realized it could be storage based. I copied my VMs from my D Drive (HDD) to my C Drive (SSD). Once I did that they started to work perfectly. I then re-examined the logs and looked for storage events. Under Applications and Service Logs -> Microsoft -> WIndows -> StorDiag, I found a long list of errors. Specifically StorDiag EventID  504, which I've copied below. I'm not exactly sure what it means, but after discovering this, I attempted to copy a large file back to the D Drive and discovered absolutely horrible write times. This seems to be the problem. Now I have to figure out the cause (if you know what this is, I'd love to hear from you). 

    I don't know the protocol on this forum is, but I'll mark this as solved and open up a new thread if I can't figure it out.

    Thanks for your help,

    Stan

    ----------------

    Log Name:      Microsoft-Windows-Storage-ClassPnP/Operational
    Source:        Microsoft-Windows-StorDiag
    Date:          6/12/2019 00:53:30
    Event ID:      504
    Task Category: Class
    Level:         Error
    Keywords:      Device I/O control request
    User:          computer\Administrator
    Computer:      my.computer.net
    Description:
    Completing a failed IOCTL request.
    Event Xml:
    <Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
      <System>
        <Provider Name="Microsoft-Windows-StorDiag" Guid="{F5D05B38-80A6-4653-825D-C414E4AB3C68}" />
        <EventID>504</EventID>
        <Version>1</Version>
        <Level>2</Level>
        <Task>200</Task>
        <Opcode>101</Opcode>
        <Keywords>0x800000040000000</Keywords>
        <TimeCreated SystemTime="2019-06-12T04:53:30.284022800Z" />
        <EventRecordID>997253</EventRecordID>
        <Correlation />
        <Execution ProcessID="1784" ThreadID="2336" />
        <Channel>Microsoft-Windows-Storage-ClassPnP/Operational</Channel>
        <Computer>my.computer.net</Computer>
        <Security UserID="S-1-5-21-4150441485-2800377868-2508223801-500" />
      </System>
      <EventData>
        <Data Name="DeviceGUID">{D393DD4A-6271-DA94-0AA1-DD1DE3F36251}</Data>
        <Data Name="DeviceNumber">0</Data>
        <Data Name="Vendor">NULL</Data>
        <Data Name="Model">ST2000DL003-9VT166</Data>
        <Data Name="FirmwareVersion">CC32</Data>
        <Data Name="SerialNumber">            6YD0GE9Q</Data>
        <Data Name="IrpStatus">0x80000011</Data>
        <Data Name="IoctlControlCode">0x7c088</Data>
      </EventData>
    </Event> 
    • Marked as answer by Stan Joseph Wednesday, June 12, 2019 5:14 AM
    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 5:13 AM
  • Hi Stan,

    I’m glad if I was of any help!

    This error does look familiar, however I’ve seen it being mostly related to USB / Smart Card / SD Card readers.

    Do you have any exclamation marks in your Device Manager?



    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 6:36 AM
  • I did have exclamation marks in Device Manager. They were for 2 PCI Ports which I previously used to connect to a Cisco Switch, and for two Unknown Devices which I have no idea what they could be. Them being in that error state has never caused me an issue, but I did disable them all and restarted my computer. No improvement. And Windows reports that the drivers for both my drives is up to date.

    I've opened a new thread for this issue here:

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/4bb323ac-0b8e-4627-8c45-85ef1b5b4ef0/server-2016-storage-stordiag-eventid-504-error-causing-extremely-slow-disk-write-speeds?forum=winserverfiles

    If you or anyone else has anymore ideas, please post your replies there. In any case, thanks so much Leon for your help.

    Thursday, June 13, 2019 5:46 PM