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xp scheduled wake (and stay awake!) from hibernate RRS feed

  • Question

  • i have this running on a pilot group. xp sp3. i use a scheduled task to run a powershell script to hibernate the machine. i run another scheduled task set to 'wake the machine to run the task' at 6 am (the task just runs GPupdate /force), about an hour before my users start getting to the office. both of these tasks "work," unfortunately it appears that at least some of the machines are going right back to sleep a few minutes after they wake up in the morning. i've read some places that windows will go back to sleep if there is no interaction like a mouse click or a keystroke. does that sound accurate, and how do i go about automatically waking up an xp machine *permanently*?
    Thursday, July 28, 2011 9:52 PM

Answers

  • The following little script will check every 10 minutes to see if the time is after 8:59.  If it is, it stops:

    do {Start-Sleep -Seconds 600} while ((Get-Date) -le (Get-Date -Hour 8))
    


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    • Marked as answer by John_Curtiss Monday, August 8, 2011 9:53 PM
    Sunday, July 31, 2011 9:17 AM

All replies

  • That's a tricky one.  The machines that are waking up to do the task and then going back to sleep are the ones that are behaving as per design.  They should all  do that.

    One quick and dirty way I can think of is to create a task that doesn't stop, or that runs for a few hours, until you think the users will be in.

    Another more complicated way would be to write a script that changes the Power Options. (under Control Panel).


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    Friday, July 29, 2011 5:50 AM
  • how would changing the power options keep it awake?

    and in my experience, making changes to the power settings as any user other than the logged on user doesn't work very well. and in some cases there won't be a logged on user.

    Friday, July 29, 2011 2:56 PM
  • True, that wouldn't work.  There is "Wake on LAN" technology that most modern computers support.  I have no experience with this, but it may be an avenue to explore. I'm assuming here that they're on a wired LAN, of course, but you mentioned laptops, which probably means wireless.

    Watch this space, and someone cleverer than me is sure to give you an answer.


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    Friday, July 29, 2011 10:48 PM
  • John, I've asked around at the scripting forum, and while your request seems simple, it is in fact difficult to acheive. 

    Would it be impertinent to ask why you want this behaviour?  Why can't the users just wiggle their mouse before they make their first cup of coffee, if it's the time factor of waking up that's the issue?

    The closest I can come up with is to run a do-nothing task at 6am until say 10am.

     


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    Saturday, July 30, 2011 8:00 AM
  • currently the machines stay powered on all night. blank screen saver kicks in after 10 minutes, monitor goes to sleep after 20. the active power scheme never stands by and never hibernates. user comes in in the morning, wiggles mouse, monitor wakes up to ctrl+alt+delete screen all in maybe 5 seconds.

    i want to hibernate the machines at night and still give the users this 5 second "wake up" in the morning when they show up between 7 am and 8 am. i wake the machine up at 6 because i don't want the user to even know it went to sleep. resuming from hibernation takes significantly longer than waking up a monitor. these users open a website to clock in, so introducing an extra several minutes to wake up is significant.

    i'm surprised nobody has ever wanted this before. why make the user wait to resume if i can do it for them?

    would a "wake on lan" magic packet keep the machine awake permanently or is it subject to this same timeout to fall back asleep if there is no activity?

    how quickly does xp fall back asleep? is there a registry setting to adjust this? i found a blog that said for windows 7 there are a couple of registry settings that control how long the machine waits to go back to sleep after it wakes up. the default in windows 7 is 120 seconds. i haven't been able to find this for XP though.

    does a "wake computer to run this task" scheduled task reset this timer? i could just schedule a gpupdate to run every couple of minutes for a couple of hours, but only run if the computer has been idle for a couple of minutes.

    Saturday, July 30, 2011 4:57 PM
  • I'm not sure about the WOL.  I would imagine it would keep the machine on, otherwise it wouldn't be much use.  Anyway, what would trigger it to turn off?  As I say I have never actually used WOL.  But lan means wired LAN.

    I haven't heard of that registry setting, probably because I've never needed to use it.

    " i could just schedule a gpupdate to run every couple of minutes for a couple of hours, but only run if the computer has been idle for a couple of minutes."

    I think you've almost answered your question.  But you don't need to do such a big job.  Just simply running cmd.exe with an empty batch file should keep it awake.  That is one way, but you'd have to experiment with the frequency, unless you can find a way to control the 'awake' time.

    If it were my problem, I'd kick off a Powerhell do-nothing task, which takes virtually no resources, and would be imperceptible to the user.  You could start it at 6, and end it at 9, or whatever.  The user would not even know it's running.  This would obviate having to adjust time-out settings etc. because the task is 'running' all the time.  I say 'running' because most of the time it's sleeping, but the calling program doesn't know that, so it keeps the computer alive.

     


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    Saturday, July 30, 2011 6:55 PM
  • This is how simple it is to write a do-nothing script.  This will sleep for an hour, then wake up briefly to be told to go back to sleep for another hour.  But the batch file calling it will be active, which should prevent the computer from sleeping

    do {start-sleep -Seconds 3600} while ($true)
    


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    Saturday, July 30, 2011 7:02 PM
  • forgive my ignorance, i just want to be clear:

    so i make a scheduled task at 6 am called StayAwake

    that calls c:\stayawake.bat,

    which contains "powershell c:\stayawake.ps1",

    and stayawake.ps1 contains do {start-sleep -Seconds 3600} while ($true)

    or can i just schedule stayawake.ps1 to run every 58 minutes for 3 hours.

    Saturday, July 30, 2011 8:05 PM
  • so i make a scheduled task at 6 am called StayAwake

    that calls c:\stayawake.bat,

    which contains "powershell c:\stayawake.ps1",

    and stayawake.ps1 contains do {start-sleep-Seconds 3600} while ($true)

     

    That's exactly right.  And schedule the task to end sometime as you see fit.

    PS: You can't run .ps1 files directly from the command line, or as a scheduled task.  It has to run inside a batch file, as you described.


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    Saturday, July 30, 2011 8:11 PM
  • was that "PS" a pun?? ;-)

    actually you can run a ps1 from a scheduled task (and i assume from the command line the same way, although i haven't ever tried it). that's how i'm putting my machines to sleep. but the scheduled task can't just run "c:\hibernate.ps1," that will just open the script in notepad--even if the ps1 file type is associated with powershell instead of notepad. dumb.

    the scheduled task has to run "powershell c:\hibernate.ps1."

    but in this case we do want a batch file to contain the ps1 script so the batch file stays "running" the whole time, correct?

    how do i schedule when a task "ends," exactly? doesn't it just run until it finishes? do you mean schedule it to repeat until a certain time?

     

    Saturday, July 30, 2011 10:24 PM
  • Hi John.  Ok I've learned something:  I didn't know you could run a .ps1 file as a scheduled task.  It definitely won't run from the command line unless you prefix it with Powershell myscript.ps1.

    Yes, I'd put it in a batch file, and schedule an end time. (Can you do this, never tried?).  As I say, the script does practically nothing, so there would be no performance hit, an it could be made to run under Local System credentials, making it invisible to the user.

    Another option would be to scrap the batch file idea, and have the script control how long it runs for,

    ...while ((get-time) -le (get-time -hour 9))

    This is a more elegant solution actually, and less complicated. 

    PS: (no pun): However, you may want to shorten the sleep time, because with  a one hour checking rate, it's possible the script may take almost an hour to stop after the condition has been met.


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    Sunday, July 31, 2011 6:25 AM
  • The following little script will check every 10 minutes to see if the time is after 8:59.  If it is, it stops:

    do {Start-Sleep -Seconds 600} while ((Get-Date) -le (Get-Date -Hour 8))
    


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    • Marked as answer by John_Curtiss Monday, August 8, 2011 9:53 PM
    Sunday, July 31, 2011 9:17 AM
  • ok cool. again, just to be clear:

    1. is it get-date or get-time? and i would use -le ...-hour 9 to keep i running until 8.59, right? rather than -le.. -hour 8?

    2. is the time in 24-hour clock, so if i wanted to run a similar script in the evening for some reason, would 8pm be -hour 20?

    Sunday, July 31, 2011 4:50 PM
  • 1. Get-Date.  There is no such cmdlet as Get-Time.  No, I made the same mistake, which only noticed when testing the code. For 9am, the number must be 8, because you are just getting the hour part of the date (i.e. 8 out of 2011-12-07 08:25), so 8:59 is less than or equal to 8, but is less than 9.  See what I mean?

    2. Depends on the time format of your pc.  For instance mine is in AM/PM mode, and the time here is 7:06pm, so the hour part of Get-Date is 7.


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    Sunday, July 31, 2011 5:05 PM
  • thanks so much for all your help on this. how about throwing an eventcreate into the script just so i can see when it's starting and stopping? i guess i could still wrap a batch file around it and do that? this or something like it would still work as far as keeping the machine awake, right?

    logwakeup.bat:

    eventcreate (/...options)

    yourscript.ps1 (or "powershell yourscript.ps1")

    eventcreate (/...more options)

     

    Sunday, July 31, 2011 8:05 PM
  • I've never used eventcreate, but what you suggest makes sense on the surface.  You do need to write 'Powershell yourscript.ps1', otherwise you'll just get error messages, becuse the default behaviour when running a .ps1 file from the command prompt is to open them for editing in Notepad.

    As usual, being a Powershell fanatic, I will mention that you can create events in the event log with Powershell:

     

    write-eventlog -logname Application -Source winlogon -eventID 3001 -entrytype Information -message "The keep-awake task started" -category 1 -rawdata 10,20
    do {Start-Sleep -Seconds 600} while ((Get-Date) -le (Get-Date -Hour 8))
    write-eventlog -logname Application -Source winlogon -eventID 3002 -entrytype Information -message "The keep-awake task ended" -category 1 -rawdata 10,20
    
    

     

     


    PS: (Pun intended):  I only need 1 helpful vote to clock me up to 1900 points!
    Sunday, July 31, 2011 8:40 PM
  • So, John, how is it working?  Is it working?
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    Tuesday, August 2, 2011 4:18 PM
  • it does not appear so. yesterday was a bad example because some of the machines woke up and installed windows updates and rebooted. however today it looks like a lot of machines went back to sleep. i did not add the event writing to the beginning and ending of the script...

    how about creating an event when it checks the time every 600 seconds so i can see it running?

    this is a beating to test. the first five or six test machines were staying awake on their own. then i deployed it to 20 pilot users, and all of theirs are behaving differently. it also seems like xp hibernate is terrible, so a lot of the time even if the machine is "awake" when they get here, it's slow and they reboot anyway. what a mess.

     

    Tuesday, August 2, 2011 9:06 PM
  • You could write to a text file every 10 minutes.  I don't see how the computer can go to sleep if you're doing this:

     

    do {Start-Sleep -Seconds 600; Get-Date | Out-File "c:\scripts\heartbeat.txt" -append} while ((Get-Date) -le (Get-Date -Hour 8))
    
    

     Maybe experiment with the sleep time.  It may be too long.


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    Wednesday, August 3, 2011 8:54 AM
  • Also, are you running this in a cmd shell?  I think that's the trick.
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    Wednesday, August 3, 2011 11:19 AM
  •  i'm just running a scheduled task that says "powershell c:\wakeupuntil10.ps1" are you saying i should be running it in a batch file? i thought you had said earlier we could scrap the batch file.

     

     

    Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:32 PM
  • No, you said we could scrap the batch file :-)

    I have thought about that in the meantime, and I don't see that it should make any difference anymore, that we've changed the script to run more often, and to actually do something every 10 minutes.

    My original thinking was that if we simply let the whole task go to sleep, then maybe the computer would sleep, and so by running it in a cmd shell, although the task is sleeping, the batch file is awake as long as that task is 'running'.

     


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    Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:39 PM
  • i'm trying to test this on one machine as follows:

    hibernate with scheduled task on the :45
    wake on the hour with your "stayawake" script
    log an I.am.awake event every 2 minutes with a scheduled task.

    i also want to log a wake.start and wake.end event with the stayawake script. so i wrapped it into a batch file with an eventcreate before and after i call the powershell script.

    i modified the powershell script to run every 300 seconds instead of 600 and since it's running repeatedly every hour day i wanted to modify get-date so that it was less than or equal to 43 but it doesn't seem to be working, maybe because it's checking the time at 40 and wouldn't check again until 45...

    but am i correct in assuming that "-le (Get-Date -minute 43) is the correct syntax?

     

     

    Thursday, August 4, 2011 7:45 PM
  • by the way, i think probably know why your script has not been working well on my 20 test users... we are running this scheduled task at 5.15 am and trying to keep it alive and running until 10 am. BUT, i'm creating the scheduled task with a group policy preference. and i'm using the "replace" action. and group policy refreshes every 90 minutes or so.

    so every time group policy refreshes, this scheduled task gets "replaced": aka deleted and recreated. and of course deleting a running task would be a good way to stop it from running, right? and recreating it doesn't re-start it since it's only scheduled to start at 5.15 am every day.

    so the task has been starting at 5.15 and then being removed as soon as the machine randomly refreshed group policy. which could be 5.16 am, or could be 8 am. which is probably why i'm seeing ridiculously inconsistent results. i've now changed my group policy to "Create" so this won't happen from now on. now the task gets created if it's not there, but doesn't get touched if it's already there. good times.

    Thursday, August 4, 2011 7:56 PM
  • Hi John,

    Glad to hear you are making progress.  When I was testing the script, I was using the 'minute' parameter, for obvious reasons.  So you are correct, in that the syntax for your test scenario would be

    ...while ((Get-Date) -le (Get-Date -Minute 45))

    You can test this in a powershell prompt (You don't have to run the whole scheduled task thing to test it.  Obviously you would drop the sleep time right down to maybe 10 seconds for testing over such a short duration.


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    Friday, August 5, 2011 3:43 AM
  • So, to demonstrate to yourself how this works, run the following at a Powershell prompt:

    do {Start-Sleep -Seconds 2; Get-Date} while ((Get-Date) -le (Get-Date -Minute 16))
    

    In this case, I ran it at 15 past the hour, and it stopped at 17 past the hour.  (Doesn't matter what the rest of the date/time string is)


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    Friday, August 5, 2011 6:18 AM
  • this is getting better, i think. most of my test machines stayed awake today. my troubleshooting so far is revealing group policy processing issues, system clock issues. i'm manually recreating the scheduled tasks on a couple of trouble machines to further test tomorrow.

    seriously, system clock issues. i'm not sure how it's "working," but it looks like a couple of machines are waking up and thinking it's 3pm 5 days from now. then after they wake up for a minute, they reset their clocks with the domain. (makes it a little less than easy to read some remote event log views.) crazy.

    Monday, August 8, 2011 9:51 PM
  • Hi John,

    Glad to hear your are making some sort of progress.  Keep us posted, and come back if your are still having weird time sync problems.

    All the best, BT


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    Tuesday, August 9, 2011 5:55 AM
  • something weird. it's 9.15am. if i go check the scheduled tasks on one of these test machines, i would expect to see the wake up task still running with a last run time of 5.15am this morning. i don't. it's not running and the last run time is "never." i'm seeing something similar on my one machine that i'm putting to sleep every hour on the :45 and waking up on the :00. the machine is always waking up to run the task but it doesn't look like the task is actually running. on the hourly test machine, i actually have the powershell script inside a batch file surrounded by my eventcreate commands. yesterday i only saw the initial "eventcreate" command about 60% of the time. it seems like during the hustle and bustle of booting up from hibernate, the scheduled task is actally not getting run. but then what is keeping the machines awake?
    Tuesday, August 9, 2011 2:20 PM
  • Hi John,

    That is strange (all of it).  For starters, let's take the test machine that you put to sleep a :45 and wake up at :00.  What's waking it up?  Surely it must be the scheduled task.

    The fact that they are waking up according to schedule is a start.  What are the result codes of the scheduled tasks?  If they are anything other than 0, then the task failed for some reason.

    So, to break it down, you need to establish:

    a. That you can control when the machines wake up by scheduling a task.

    b. That the task does in fact run correctly (use any known working task for this test).

    c. That while running, the computer does indeed stay awake because of the task.

    After you've established those things, we can look at why the task isn't running because this could be for a variety of reasons. 

    So what I'm saying is forget the Powershell script for now, and just run a task like notepad or something, from a .cmd batch file.  That's the whole principle of what I'm going for here:  To simply run Notepad, it will run asynchronously, meaning that it is not 'holding' Windows, and is simply waiting for input events (mouse movements & clicks, keyboard input).  But when a batch file is calling it, my theory is that the batch file will be active as the calling shell, and the O/S will see this, and not the fact that Notepad is idle.

    I can't help by trying to reproduce the problem, because my machine is never idle!

     


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    • Edited by Bigteddy Wednesday, August 10, 2011 2:58 AM
    Tuesday, August 9, 2011 2:38 PM
  • the task has no result code, because the task has a last run time of "never." i'm saying what i think is happening is the machine is waking up to run a task, but because of all the other stuff going on during a wake up, is forgetting to run the task at all. out of my 25 test machines that all woke up at 5.15 this morning, 25 of them have a last run time of "never" on the "wakeup" task. if i look in the task scheduler log file in the windows directory, i see the hibernate task start at 8pm, and then the "i am awake" task (not the wake up task, but the one that logs an event every 10 minutes that says "im.awake" so i can monitor when the machines are awake and staying awake.) at around 5.17am. there is no run or attempted run of the "wakeup" scheduled task.

     

    "I Am Awake.job" (AwakeEvent.bat)
     Started 8/8/2011 7:55:00 PM
    "I Am Awake.job" (AwakeEvent.bat)
     Finished 8/8/2011 7:55:00 PM
     Result: The task completed with an exit code of (0).
    "Hibernate.job" (powershell)
     Started 8/8/2011 8:00:00 PM
    "I Am Awake.job" (AwakeEvent.bat)
     Started 8/9/2011 5:17:43 AM
    "Hibernate.job" (powershell)
     Finished 8/9/2011 5:17:52 AM
     Result: The task completed with an exit code of (0).
    "I Am Awake.job" (AwakeEvent.bat)
     Finished 8/9/2011 5:17:54 AM
     Result: The task completed with an exit code of (0).
    "I Am Awake.job" (AwakeEvent.bat)
     Started 8/9/2011 5:25:01 AM

     

    Tuesday, August 9, 2011 3:14 PM
  • i might also point out that if i right-click one of these scheduled tasks and run it manually, it stays running until the right time just as designed. i tested that yesterday starting at 8:47 am. i have the get-date -le set to 10 so the task will stay running until 11 am. and it stopped running at 11:07 (the first time it would have checked after the hour became greater than 10.)

    "Wake Up.job" (powershell)
     Started 8/8/2011 8:47:40 AM

    "Wake Up.job" (powershell)
     Finished 8/8/2011 11:07:47 AM
     Result: The task completed with an exit code of (0).

     

     

    Tuesday, August 9, 2011 6:01 PM
  • So if the Powershell task is running correctly manually, and the machines are waking up to do the task, what can be going wrong?

    You seem to have a handle on it, John.  As I said (that was a typo), I can't reproduce the scenario, because I have a desktop machine that never sleeps.


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    Wednesday, August 10, 2011 3:01 AM
  • if i *don't* hibernate the machine at night, the wakeup task runs at 5.15am and continues to run until 11am as expected. so again, it looks like the wakeup process is too resource-intensive to remember to do what it woke up to do-- run the task. there is no error, no status code. it just says the last time the task ran was yesterday morning, not this morning. the task just isn't starting on wakeup.

    i'm going to add another schedule to the wakeup task to run every morning at 5.19 am in addition to running at 5.15 am. i'm guessing/hoping the task will start consistently at 5.19am and work like we want it to.

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 2:51 PM
  •  it looks like the wakeup process is too resource-intensive to remember to do what it woke up to do-- run the task.


    This is bizzare.  But I like your way of thinking:  You don't give up easily!  Logically speaking (and I suppose logic doesn't count, because we have left the realms of logic), having a task wake the computer, and another one a few minutes later should work, given the behaviour you have noted.

    Gook luck.  Keep us posted.

     

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 3:06 PM
  • i thought this was interesting, if not helpful in anyway. on my test machine, just sitting alone in a cube doing nothing except running a "wake up" scheduled task every hour on the hour (which logs an event in the event log when it starts) and running a "hibernate" scheduled task every hour on the 45. nobody is touching this machine. here is the pattern of when the "wake up" task is logging the event, aka starting. x means it ran, red means it didn't run when it was scheduled to. interesting that it seems to run pretty consistently overnight between 8pm and 8am, and horribly inconsistently during the day, even though, again, i assure you, nobody is touching this computer.

     i don't have much evidence as to whether the machine is actually waking up to run the task and not running it (like on all my other machines that are just waking up once a day), or if it's not waking up at all.

    Click here to view full size

     

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 9:59 PM
  • I see the facts, but like I said before, we have left the realms of logic.  As far as the computer (XP) is concerned, the time of day shouldn't matter.  The only thing that it may do by itself is Automatic Updates at the default of 3am.

    How's your experiment with the 2 tasks coming along?  You know, the one to wake it up, and one to keep it awake?

    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 7:18 AM
  • this morning, out of 26 test machines, 22 of them were still running the "wake up" task at 9.15am. four of the 22 had a last run time of 5.15-5.17am today, and the other 18 had a last run time of 5.19am today.

    the four machines that were not running the task at 9.15am did not start the task at all, and have been problems all along. i have been updating drivers and bios; we'll see how it goes tomorrow.

    i also suspect there may be some system clock issues. the trouble machines are all a couple of years old, but my test test machine (the checkerboard screenshot above) is brand new. three of the trouble machines woke up late: one at 5.19, one at 5.25, one at 5.57. (i have another task logging an "im.awake" event every 10 minutes). i'm not sure how windows works with the machine/bios clock to decide what time it is to wake up the machine. but is it possible the machine wakes up when it thinks it's 5.15 am, but by the time windows comes all the way back up from hibernation, it thinks the time is after 5.15am so it doesn't run the task?

    machine: hey windows, it's 5.15am, wake up. you need to run a scheduled task at 5.15am.

    windows: man, that was a great hibernation. oh look at the time, it's 5.17am. i'll just run the task tomorrow at 5.15am.

    and these three machines aren't even waking up at 5.15, they are waking up even later, so there is no chance for them to start a scheduled task at 5.15 if the machine doesn't wake it up until after. makes sense...?

    the fourth trouble machine is not waking up at all, and hasn't ever through this whole process. maybe her machine clock thinks it's a few hours earlier than windows thinks it is.

    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 3:55 PM
  •  

    well i checked the system clocks in bios and they seem fine. actually now i have adjusted my theory.

    on the machine that is "not waking up at all," i had one of my desktop support guys update the bios and drivers when he came in this morning. the user doesn't get in until 10 am. he told me a couple of hours ago that at 7.30, he went up to her machine and it was still on the black and white "resuming windows" screen. so it's probably waking up at 5.15 and just struggling to wake up. i have a hunch the one that's "waking up" at 5.55 is the same way, just taking 40 minutes to resume.

     

    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 8:29 PM
  • Well, it sounds like you're making progress.  If you've narrowed it down to just two bad machines, the battle is bascally won.  Well done!
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 7:09 AM