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Disable all maintenance windows temporarily RRS feed

  • Question

  •  Hello,

    Recently, I posted the below in the Software Updates forums:

    I have a question about when a client evaluates information about its maintenance window. This came up because I wanted to temporarily disable our weekly maintenance windows due to a production change freeze. In order to do this, yesterday I unchecked each maintenance window we have set in our collection settings. I made an incorrect assumption that this would be picked up during the next machine policy cycle, which happens every 60 minutes in our environment. I verified my change by running the maintenance window report and made sure that "Maintenance Mode Enabled" = False.

    To my surprise, when that time came around today, the machines installed the security patches and rebooted - ignoring the fact that I disabled their window 24 hours ago. Any insight into what I'm missing about this process would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

    I now understand that just unchecking this box is the equivalent of deleting the maintenance window and doesn't "disable" it like I thought (or at least in the way I'd hoped it did). My problem is that I'm looking for a way to temporarily disable all maintenance windows so software updates and advertisements with mandatory assignments will not run for some period of time that I define. It's becoming clear to me that this feature isn't native in SCCM, but I would appreciate anyone's thoughts on other ways to accomplish this. I'm essentially trying to implement a production change freeze procedure so nothing happens for some period of time (even if mandatory updates or software are missing).

    Any thoughts/ideas would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!

    -joe c


    -joe c
    Tuesday, January 13, 2009 3:28 PM

Answers

  • This might also help:  set the startup type of the ConfigMgr client to "manual" or create a local policy to disable software distribution and software updates (might be tricky to get rid of it again) or set the maintenance window to a duration of 1 minute or make sure that the computers are not members of the collection where the advertisemens/deployments are targeted to or disabling the agents (as you described) ... but that should all be tested in a lab before
    Tuesday, January 13, 2009 7:37 PM

All replies

  • I would disable the programs or remove the advertismments instead of trying to remove the maintenance window. I would have thought that it worked the same way that you thought it did though.
    John Marcum, Systems Management Architect - www.TrueSec.com
    Tuesday, January 13, 2009 3:40 PM
  • I started down the path of disabling programs too, but then realized that there doesn't seem to be a way to disable a software deployment. So that method works for advertised programs only (unless I'm just missing something).

    Does anyone know if a downside to temporarily disabling the Advertised Programs Client Agent and the Software Updates Client Agent? This (I think) meets my objective of:

     1) Getting out to the client ASAP (on machine policy refresh) and
     2) Stoping any further software updates or advertised programs from running
    -joe c
    Tuesday, January 13, 2009 4:00 PM
  • This might also help:  set the startup type of the ConfigMgr client to "manual" or create a local policy to disable software distribution and software updates (might be tricky to get rid of it again) or set the maintenance window to a duration of 1 minute or make sure that the computers are not members of the collection where the advertisemens/deployments are targeted to or disabling the agents (as you described) ... but that should all be tested in a lab before
    Tuesday, January 13, 2009 7:37 PM