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  • Question

  • why does it restarts?
    • Moved by Othorvath Sunday, January 18, 2009 1:56 AM (Moved from Windows 7 Installation, Setup, and Deployment to Windows 7 Miscellaneous)
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 1:33 AM

Answers

  • alex.wtho said:

    why does it restarts?



    An operating system can auto-restart for various reasons.
    There are planned restarts such as during software updates, installations, etc. The main reason for the planned restart is to either replace a file that is in-use by the operating system or to start a device driver or service that must be running prior to the Kernel start. An example of this would be a disk driver or Ramdisk driver. These are called low level drivers. They are there when Windows needs them to start (such as if you had your page file in ram disk or if your drive would not work with Windows).

    There are also un-planned restarts. These are caused mainly when a program and/or driver tries to write to a memory location that is inside the operating system protected zone. For example: If a programmer takes a short-cut and tells the operating system to store something in memory location c000 without permission, the operating system must assume that something is wrong and protect itself. The only way to protect itself is to stop operation if it thinks it has mbeen corrupted.
    There are also driver incompatablities that can cause this. If you force a driver from Windows XP to load into Vista or Windows 7 (syuch as an NVidia video driver), the driver does not know that the operating system has changed the location of the area the driver writes to. When it writes to that address, it is possibly overwriting part of Windows, causing an error.

    The reboot you are seeing is not the only thing that is happening. Back in the day, you would have seen what we call a BSOD (Blue Screen Of Death) which shows the error code, memory location, and file that caused the error. In XP, Vista, Win7, etc the BSOD is followed by a reboot command so the BSOD disappears before you see it to allow the OS to try to fix the issue.
    If you are having reboot issues, do the following (either in safe mode or as an administrator):
    go to control panel, select show all, select system, then select advanced system settings on the left side. In Advanced system settings, click settings in the startup and recovery box. Unchecck the box that says automatically restart and click ok.
    What will happen now is that instead of flashing the BSOD, windows will leave it on the screen for you to see. Write down any filename it says caused the problem and the code and error type it gives. You can then either look those up in Google, MSN, or post in this forum to find out what to do about it.

    Hope this helps!
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 3:15 AM

All replies

  • What where you doing when it starts restarting?
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 2:08 AM
  • alex.wtho said:

    why does it restarts?



    An operating system can auto-restart for various reasons.
    There are planned restarts such as during software updates, installations, etc. The main reason for the planned restart is to either replace a file that is in-use by the operating system or to start a device driver or service that must be running prior to the Kernel start. An example of this would be a disk driver or Ramdisk driver. These are called low level drivers. They are there when Windows needs them to start (such as if you had your page file in ram disk or if your drive would not work with Windows).

    There are also un-planned restarts. These are caused mainly when a program and/or driver tries to write to a memory location that is inside the operating system protected zone. For example: If a programmer takes a short-cut and tells the operating system to store something in memory location c000 without permission, the operating system must assume that something is wrong and protect itself. The only way to protect itself is to stop operation if it thinks it has mbeen corrupted.
    There are also driver incompatablities that can cause this. If you force a driver from Windows XP to load into Vista or Windows 7 (syuch as an NVidia video driver), the driver does not know that the operating system has changed the location of the area the driver writes to. When it writes to that address, it is possibly overwriting part of Windows, causing an error.

    The reboot you are seeing is not the only thing that is happening. Back in the day, you would have seen what we call a BSOD (Blue Screen Of Death) which shows the error code, memory location, and file that caused the error. In XP, Vista, Win7, etc the BSOD is followed by a reboot command so the BSOD disappears before you see it to allow the OS to try to fix the issue.
    If you are having reboot issues, do the following (either in safe mode or as an administrator):
    go to control panel, select show all, select system, then select advanced system settings on the left side. In Advanced system settings, click settings in the startup and recovery box. Unchecck the box that says automatically restart and click ok.
    What will happen now is that instead of flashing the BSOD, windows will leave it on the screen for you to see. Write down any filename it says caused the problem and the code and error type it gives. You can then either look those up in Google, MSN, or post in this forum to find out what to do about it.

    Hope this helps!
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 3:15 AM