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  • Question

  • I recently bought a used laptop.  I have changed the password and created an aministrator account.  The problen is there are still folders with the previous owner's name.  I've tring changing them to my name, cutting, deleting, etc.  It keeps telling me I need permission to do so.  I'm the only administrator on the computer.....what do I need to do to get this permission?

    Sunday, September 7, 2008 6:45 AM

Answers

  • Hi

     

    A bit of an explanation first.

     

    You will not be able to change the names of the default user account folders, not even your own, since these are associated with that user accounts SID (Security Identifier). Even if you change the name of your user account or that other user account, this will still not change the name of the default folders in that account.

     

    Don't try to move the folders, just move the 'files' that are contained in those folders.

     

    Move all of the files that you want to keep from that old account to the existing or new folders that you create in your account. After you are finished, you can then delete that account in Control Panel/User Accounts. When you delete the old account, you will be given the option to also delete all of the folders for that account.

     

    You will need to grant your account permission to move these files. To do this, follow these steps.

     

    Log on with your administrator account.

    Go to Start / All Programs / Accessories.

    Right click the Command Prompt item and select the 'Run As Administrator' option.

    Click Continue on the UAC prompt.

     

    In the command window, enter the following command.

     

     icacls path /T /grant username:F

     

    Press ENTER.

     

    *Where 'path' is the path to the old account. Example:C:\Users\oldaccountname
    *Where username is the name of the administrator account you are currently logged on with.
    **Make sure the command is entered exactly as shown, including the 4 spaces and colon.
    **If the 'path' contains any spaces, you will need to enclose the path in double quotes.

     

    Let us know if you have more questions.

     


    If this post helps to resolve your issue, click the Mark as Answer or Helpful button at the top of this message.
    By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.

    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience
    Sunday, September 7, 2008 11:47 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi

     

    A bit of an explanation first.

     

    You will not be able to change the names of the default user account folders, not even your own, since these are associated with that user accounts SID (Security Identifier). Even if you change the name of your user account or that other user account, this will still not change the name of the default folders in that account.

     

    Don't try to move the folders, just move the 'files' that are contained in those folders.

     

    Move all of the files that you want to keep from that old account to the existing or new folders that you create in your account. After you are finished, you can then delete that account in Control Panel/User Accounts. When you delete the old account, you will be given the option to also delete all of the folders for that account.

     

    You will need to grant your account permission to move these files. To do this, follow these steps.

     

    Log on with your administrator account.

    Go to Start / All Programs / Accessories.

    Right click the Command Prompt item and select the 'Run As Administrator' option.

    Click Continue on the UAC prompt.

     

    In the command window, enter the following command.

     

     icacls path /T /grant username:F

     

    Press ENTER.

     

    *Where 'path' is the path to the old account. Example:C:\Users\oldaccountname
    *Where username is the name of the administrator account you are currently logged on with.
    **Make sure the command is entered exactly as shown, including the 4 spaces and colon.
    **If the 'path' contains any spaces, you will need to enclose the path in double quotes.

     

    Let us know if you have more questions.

     


    If this post helps to resolve your issue, click the Mark as Answer or Helpful button at the top of this message.
    By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.

    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience
    Sunday, September 7, 2008 11:47 PM
    Moderator
  • I tried what you told me and this is what came up.......can you let me know what it means?

    C:\Users\John>icacls path /T /grant username:F
    username: No mapping between account names and security IDs was done.
    Successfully processed 0 files; Failed processing 1 files
    Tuesday, September 16, 2008 2:49 AM
  • Hi

     

    Let's try this again, with a couple of minor changes.

     

    Make sure that you follow these instructions exactly.

     

    Log on with your administrator account.

    Go to Start / All Programs / Accessories.

    Right click the Command Prompt item and select the 'Run As Administrator' option.

    Click Continue on the UAC prompt.

     

    In the command window, enter the following commands.

     

    CD\

     

    Press ENTER.

     

    At   C:\>   enter the following command.

     

     icacls path /T /grant username:F

     

    Press ENTER.

     

    *Where 'path' is the path to the old account. Example: Users\oldaccountname
    *Where username is the name of the administrator account you are currently logged on with.
    **Make sure the command is entered exactly as shown, including the 4 spaces and colon.

     

    Let me know the results.

     

    If there are still problems, please answer the following.

     

    Is the old owners administrator account still on the system or did you delete the account?

    Do you need to save any of the files in the old users account?

    Please post the exact name of the old user account and the exact name of your current administrator account and I can give you the exact command to use.

     




    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience
    Tuesday, September 16, 2008 4:21 AM
    Moderator
  • Just an observation but i recently had a similar issue with a domain member PC. Logging in with a domain admin account with local admin privileges still did not allow me to run the icacls command successfully even if i right clicked command prompt and chose "run as administrator". I had to log in with the local 'administrator' account.
    Wednesday, January 20, 2010 5:43 PM