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Chess Titans Cheats RRS feed

  • Question

  • Does this look legal? The king clearly just moved two spaces, and although you can't tell in this picture, the rook also moved like 3.

    http://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg3/moose9036/Capture.jpg
    Tuesday, August 5, 2008 10:48 PM

Answers

  • Moose

     

    Yes, this is a legal move in chess.

     

    It's called 'Castling' and is a way to protect the King when it may be in imminent danger.

     

    The following rules apply for Castling.

     

    Castling is a legal move in Chess, but the following conditions must be met:
    * The king that makes the castling move has not yet moved in the game.
    * The rook that makes the castling move has not yet moved in the game.
    * The king is not in check.
    * The king does not move over a square that is attacked by an enemy piece during the castling move, i.e., when castling, there may not be an enemy piece that can move (in case of pawns: by diagonal movement) to a square that is moved over by the king.
    * The king does not move to a square that is attacked by an enemy piece during the castling move, i.e., you may not castle and end the move with the king in check.
    * All squares between the rook and king before the castling move are empty.
    * The King and rook must occupy the same Row.

    When castling, the king moves two squares towards the rook, and the rook moves over the king to the next square, i.e., black's king on e8 and rook on a8 move to: king c8, rook d8 (long castling), white's king on e1 and rook on h1 move to: king g1, rook f1 (short castling).

     

    Illustrated rules of chess:
    http://www.chessvariants.org/d.chess/chess.html

     


    If this post helps to resolve your issue, click the Mark as Answer button at the top of this message.
    By marking a post as Answered, you help others find the answer faster.

    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience
    Wednesday, August 6, 2008 11:23 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Moose

     

    Yes, this is a legal move in chess.

     

    It's called 'Castling' and is a way to protect the King when it may be in imminent danger.

     

    The following rules apply for Castling.

     

    Castling is a legal move in Chess, but the following conditions must be met:
    * The king that makes the castling move has not yet moved in the game.
    * The rook that makes the castling move has not yet moved in the game.
    * The king is not in check.
    * The king does not move over a square that is attacked by an enemy piece during the castling move, i.e., when castling, there may not be an enemy piece that can move (in case of pawns: by diagonal movement) to a square that is moved over by the king.
    * The king does not move to a square that is attacked by an enemy piece during the castling move, i.e., you may not castle and end the move with the king in check.
    * All squares between the rook and king before the castling move are empty.
    * The King and rook must occupy the same Row.

    When castling, the king moves two squares towards the rook, and the rook moves over the king to the next square, i.e., black's king on e8 and rook on a8 move to: king c8, rook d8 (long castling), white's king on e1 and rook on h1 move to: king g1, rook f1 (short castling).

     

    Illustrated rules of chess:
    http://www.chessvariants.org/d.chess/chess.html

     


    If this post helps to resolve your issue, click the Mark as Answer button at the top of this message.
    By marking a post as Answered, you help others find the answer faster.

    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience
    Wednesday, August 6, 2008 11:23 PM
    Moderator
  • Yes, but castling through check is not legal.  Chess Titans just did that to me.  I had the bishop advanced to the center of the board, covering H2 and H6.  Titan castles Queen side.  With that bishop placement and no cover, black cannot legally castle.   

    I went back, played the same leading move and it castled through check again.

    Major bug!!!

    Guy Lee

    Past President  - University of Pittsburgh Chess Club

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 6:31 PM