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What are the benifits of extended the Activie Directoy Schema RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello All,

    I am deploying sccm 2012 R2 at my company. My question is, why should I extend the schema? What are th benefits in how SCCM 2012 R2 talks to objects in AD? I have done a google search but with my limited understading of the Schema I was hoping for a more "dumbed" down explanation.

    Thanks in advance


    Phil Balderos

    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 2:51 PM

Answers

  • You get to keep your hair and your sanity. :-)

    John Marcum | Microsoft MVP - Enterprise Client Management
    My blog: System Center Admin | Twitter: @SCCM_Marcum | Linkedin: John Marcum

    • Marked as answer by vPhillip B Wednesday, March 11, 2015 2:56 PM
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 7:55 PM
  • Let's just say it makes management and deployment a lot easier. 

    Here's a list of benefits

    http://systemcentersupport.blogspot.co.uk/2010/01/once-you-extend-active-directory-schema.html


    Cheers Paul | http://sccmentor.wordpress.com

    • Proposed as answer by Richard.Knight Tuesday, March 10, 2015 3:18 PM
    • Marked as answer by vPhillip B Tuesday, March 10, 2015 5:56 PM
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 3:00 PM
  • Feels like a game of Jeopardy :)

    What is the Active Directory schema?
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-au/library/cc784826(v=ws.10).aspx

    In some situations, the default attributes and object definitions in the schema are insufficient to create new object types that are required by some applications or services that interoperate with the directory. In these situations, it is possible to customize the schema by adding new object definitions to it. The process of adding definitions to the schema is referred to as “extending the schema.”

    The benefits of schema extension for ConfigMgr, are as described in the linked blog post.

    You don't "have to" extend schema for ConfigMgr, but if you don't extend, there are several features which won't work well (or at all), which means you would need to perform extra manual tasks for many things instead of having your domain member clients auto-discover from the directory.

    Once the schema is extended for ConfigMgr, the site servers etc can auto-publish objects and populate attribute values into the directory, and the clients can then use those published objects to locate services in an automatic, built-in, seamless way.
    This avoids you needing to specify parameters on the commandline when installing CM client, for example.

    As an analogy, it's a little like DNS;

    - You have a DNS implemented
    - Your DNS contains various types of records (e.g. A records, PTR records, SRV records, etc), each record contains specific (unique) data
    - You need to create a new type of DNS record (e.g. an MX record)
    - First, you might have to configure the DNS master to know what an MX record is, and what types of attributes/data that an MX record must/should contain. You need to do that before you can create any MX records in DNS. This is similar in concept to a schema extension.
    - Having defined the MX record type, you can now create MX records within your DNS.

    If you don't define the MX record type, then you can't create any MX records, so you would forego the benefits of the function/feature provided by having MX records in your DNS. (this is kind of a ridiculous example, to illustrate the point ;)


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)


    • Edited by DonPick Tuesday, March 10, 2015 8:31 PM
    • Marked as answer by vPhillip B Wednesday, March 11, 2015 2:56 PM
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 8:28 PM
  • You get to keep your hair and your sanity. :-)

    John Marcum | Microsoft MVP - Enterprise Client Management
    My blog: System Center Admin | Twitter: @SCCM_Marcum | Linkedin: John Marcum

    That's the best answer of the lot John ;-)

    Cheers Paul | http://sccmentor.wordpress.com

    • Marked as answer by vPhillip B Wednesday, March 11, 2015 2:56 PM
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 10:24 PM

All replies

  • Let's just say it makes management and deployment a lot easier. 

    Here's a list of benefits

    http://systemcentersupport.blogspot.co.uk/2010/01/once-you-extend-active-directory-schema.html


    Cheers Paul | http://sccmentor.wordpress.com

    • Proposed as answer by Richard.Knight Tuesday, March 10, 2015 3:18 PM
    • Marked as answer by vPhillip B Tuesday, March 10, 2015 5:56 PM
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 3:00 PM
  • You get to keep your hair and your sanity. :-)

    John Marcum | Microsoft MVP - Enterprise Client Management
    My blog: System Center Admin | Twitter: @SCCM_Marcum | Linkedin: John Marcum

    • Marked as answer by vPhillip B Wednesday, March 11, 2015 2:56 PM
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 7:55 PM
  • Feels like a game of Jeopardy :)

    What is the Active Directory schema?
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-au/library/cc784826(v=ws.10).aspx

    In some situations, the default attributes and object definitions in the schema are insufficient to create new object types that are required by some applications or services that interoperate with the directory. In these situations, it is possible to customize the schema by adding new object definitions to it. The process of adding definitions to the schema is referred to as “extending the schema.”

    The benefits of schema extension for ConfigMgr, are as described in the linked blog post.

    You don't "have to" extend schema for ConfigMgr, but if you don't extend, there are several features which won't work well (or at all), which means you would need to perform extra manual tasks for many things instead of having your domain member clients auto-discover from the directory.

    Once the schema is extended for ConfigMgr, the site servers etc can auto-publish objects and populate attribute values into the directory, and the clients can then use those published objects to locate services in an automatic, built-in, seamless way.
    This avoids you needing to specify parameters on the commandline when installing CM client, for example.

    As an analogy, it's a little like DNS;

    - You have a DNS implemented
    - Your DNS contains various types of records (e.g. A records, PTR records, SRV records, etc), each record contains specific (unique) data
    - You need to create a new type of DNS record (e.g. an MX record)
    - First, you might have to configure the DNS master to know what an MX record is, and what types of attributes/data that an MX record must/should contain. You need to do that before you can create any MX records in DNS. This is similar in concept to a schema extension.
    - Having defined the MX record type, you can now create MX records within your DNS.

    If you don't define the MX record type, then you can't create any MX records, so you would forego the benefits of the function/feature provided by having MX records in your DNS. (this is kind of a ridiculous example, to illustrate the point ;)


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)


    • Edited by DonPick Tuesday, March 10, 2015 8:31 PM
    • Marked as answer by vPhillip B Wednesday, March 11, 2015 2:56 PM
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 8:28 PM
  • You get to keep your hair and your sanity. :-)

    John Marcum | Microsoft MVP - Enterprise Client Management
    My blog: System Center Admin | Twitter: @SCCM_Marcum | Linkedin: John Marcum

    That's the best answer of the lot John ;-)

    Cheers Paul | http://sccmentor.wordpress.com

    • Marked as answer by vPhillip B Wednesday, March 11, 2015 2:56 PM
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 10:24 PM
  • Thanks guys for all of the feed back. I already lost my hair hopefully I'll keep my sanity.

    Phil Balderos

    Wednesday, March 11, 2015 3:07 PM