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Problem with windows backup RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am using Windows 7 RC and when I try to backup I get and error message that looks like this:
    "A Shadow Copy could not be created. Please check the "VSS" and "SPP" event logs for more information.
    Details: The specified volume is nested to deeply to participate in the VSS operation."

    I don't know why this is happening. Please HELP!
    • Moved by Carey FrischMVP Tuesday, August 25, 2009 2:34 PM Moved to proper category (From:Windows 7 Miscellaneous)
    Tuesday, August 25, 2009 2:31 PM

Answers

  • Hi Jbpeach,

     

    I tried taking back up of my Windows 7 RC VM to a Windows 7 system in the network and it was successfully done.

     

    Please check if you are following the following guidelines for back up (from Windows Help & Support) and also if your Windows updates have been done recently.

     

    The following table lists the types of backup destinations that Windows Backup supports and the advantages and disadvantages of each.

    Destination Type

    Advantages

    Disadvantages

    Internal hard drives

            Hard drives are relatively inexpensive and aren't affected if you have a problem with your operating system. You can even install the drive in another computer if you buy a new computer and you still want to use the disk for backups.

    Notes

            Another hard drive isn't the same thing as a partition. You can save your backups on a partition on your drive, but if the drive were to fail, you would lose your backups.

            You should also never back up files on the same drive that Windows is installed on, because if your computer gets a virus or has a software failure, you might have to reformat the drive and reinstall Windows to recover from the problem and then you would lose your backup data.

            Internal hard drives are more secure than other media because they aren't being moved around, which makes it less likely that they'll crash or become damaged.

            Internal hard drives are more efficient than external hard drives or removable media.

            If your computer doesn't already have another hard drive, you need to install one or have someone install it for you.

            If you have a problem with your computer, you can still use the drive by moving it to another computer, but you need to know how to install it in the new computer or have someone install it for you.

            Since the hard drive is installed inside your computer, you can't store it in a location separate from your computer, such as in a fireproof safe.

    External hard drives

            An external hard drive can easily be attached to your computer using a USB port.

            External hard drives can hold lots of information. We recommend that you use an external hard drive that holds at least 200 gigabytes (GB).

            External hard drives can be stored in a location that's separate from your computer, such as a fireproof safe, which can help protect your backup.

            The external hard drive needs to be plugged into your computer and available when a backup is scheduled to occur. If you store your hard drive somewhere else for safekeeping, you'll need to remember to get it out and attach it to your computer before your backup is scheduled.

    Writeable CDs or DVDs

            Many newer computers have CD or DVD burners installed in them.

            CDs and DVDs are relatively inexpensive and are easy to find in most department and electronics stores.

            You can store the CDs or DVDs in a location that's separate from your computer, such as a fireproof safe.

            You can't save scheduled system image backups on CDs or DVDs.

            Depending on how much data you have, it might take several CDs or DVDs to hold your backup and you would need to store and keep track of all of them.

            CDs or DVDs can become corrupted over time.

    USB flash drives

            USB flash drives are relatively inexpensive and can hold a fair amount of data. To save a backup on a flash drive, it must be able to hold more than 1 GB.

            You can store a flash drive in a location that's separate from your computer, such as in a fireproof safe.

            You can't save a system image on a flash drive.

            Depending on the size of your flash drive, it could fill up quickly, which means you won't be able to keep copies of older backups.

     

    Network locations

            If your computer is on a network, a shared folder or drive on the network can be a convenient place to save your backup as it doesn't require you to have storage space on your computer.

            You can only save your backups on a network location on Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate, and Windows 7 Enterprise.

            You'll need to provide a user name and password so that Windows Backup can access the network location. If you can access the network location from the Computer folder on your computer without having to type a user name or password, type the user name and password that you used to log on to the computer into the Windows Backup UI. If you aren't able to access the network location from the Computer folder on your computer, you'll need to create a user account on the network computer and type the user name and password for that user account into the Windows Backup wizard.

            The network location must be available at the time the backup is scheduled to occur and the user name and password that you provided when you set up your backup must still be valid for the network location.

            Other people who have access to the network location might be able to access your backup.

            If you create a system image, Windows will only keep the latest version of the system image.

     

     

    I hope above information helps!

    Thanks,


    Shruti

    • Proposed as answer by Shruti Mishra Thursday, August 27, 2009 5:33 PM
    • Marked as answer by Andy Song Friday, September 4, 2009 10:39 AM
    Thursday, August 27, 2009 5:32 PM

All replies

  • Hi Jbpeach,

     

    I tried taking back up of my Windows 7 RC VM to a Windows 7 system in the network and it was successfully done.

     

    Please check if you are following the following guidelines for back up (from Windows Help & Support) and also if your Windows updates have been done recently.

     

    The following table lists the types of backup destinations that Windows Backup supports and the advantages and disadvantages of each.

    Destination Type

    Advantages

    Disadvantages

    Internal hard drives

            Hard drives are relatively inexpensive and aren't affected if you have a problem with your operating system. You can even install the drive in another computer if you buy a new computer and you still want to use the disk for backups.

    Notes

            Another hard drive isn't the same thing as a partition. You can save your backups on a partition on your drive, but if the drive were to fail, you would lose your backups.

            You should also never back up files on the same drive that Windows is installed on, because if your computer gets a virus or has a software failure, you might have to reformat the drive and reinstall Windows to recover from the problem and then you would lose your backup data.

            Internal hard drives are more secure than other media because they aren't being moved around, which makes it less likely that they'll crash or become damaged.

            Internal hard drives are more efficient than external hard drives or removable media.

            If your computer doesn't already have another hard drive, you need to install one or have someone install it for you.

            If you have a problem with your computer, you can still use the drive by moving it to another computer, but you need to know how to install it in the new computer or have someone install it for you.

            Since the hard drive is installed inside your computer, you can't store it in a location separate from your computer, such as in a fireproof safe.

    External hard drives

            An external hard drive can easily be attached to your computer using a USB port.

            External hard drives can hold lots of information. We recommend that you use an external hard drive that holds at least 200 gigabytes (GB).

            External hard drives can be stored in a location that's separate from your computer, such as a fireproof safe, which can help protect your backup.

            The external hard drive needs to be plugged into your computer and available when a backup is scheduled to occur. If you store your hard drive somewhere else for safekeeping, you'll need to remember to get it out and attach it to your computer before your backup is scheduled.

    Writeable CDs or DVDs

            Many newer computers have CD or DVD burners installed in them.

            CDs and DVDs are relatively inexpensive and are easy to find in most department and electronics stores.

            You can store the CDs or DVDs in a location that's separate from your computer, such as a fireproof safe.

            You can't save scheduled system image backups on CDs or DVDs.

            Depending on how much data you have, it might take several CDs or DVDs to hold your backup and you would need to store and keep track of all of them.

            CDs or DVDs can become corrupted over time.

    USB flash drives

            USB flash drives are relatively inexpensive and can hold a fair amount of data. To save a backup on a flash drive, it must be able to hold more than 1 GB.

            You can store a flash drive in a location that's separate from your computer, such as in a fireproof safe.

            You can't save a system image on a flash drive.

            Depending on the size of your flash drive, it could fill up quickly, which means you won't be able to keep copies of older backups.

     

    Network locations

            If your computer is on a network, a shared folder or drive on the network can be a convenient place to save your backup as it doesn't require you to have storage space on your computer.

            You can only save your backups on a network location on Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate, and Windows 7 Enterprise.

            You'll need to provide a user name and password so that Windows Backup can access the network location. If you can access the network location from the Computer folder on your computer without having to type a user name or password, type the user name and password that you used to log on to the computer into the Windows Backup UI. If you aren't able to access the network location from the Computer folder on your computer, you'll need to create a user account on the network computer and type the user name and password for that user account into the Windows Backup wizard.

            The network location must be available at the time the backup is scheduled to occur and the user name and password that you provided when you set up your backup must still be valid for the network location.

            Other people who have access to the network location might be able to access your backup.

            If you create a system image, Windows will only keep the latest version of the system image.

     

     

    I hope above information helps!

    Thanks,


    Shruti

    • Proposed as answer by Shruti Mishra Thursday, August 27, 2009 5:33 PM
    • Marked as answer by Andy Song Friday, September 4, 2009 10:39 AM
    Thursday, August 27, 2009 5:32 PM
  • This is not my problem though
    Thursday, August 27, 2009 6:05 PM
  • Hi,

    Regret the inconvenience caused. Could you please zip and email the contents of <<Systemdrive>>\Windows\Logs\WindowsBackup to sneham_at_microsoft_dot_com(Remove underscores and replace characters with words wherever applicable). This will help us investigate the issue.

    Thanks,
    Sneha
    [MSFT]
    Wednesday, October 7, 2009 11:01 AM