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Need help storing Japanese characters in my database RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    My application has multi-lingual users therefore I need to be able to save their entries in multiple languages. Primary languages are English and Japanese.

    What do I need to do to save entries made in Japanese? Is it the collation I need to modify for my table and/or column?

    It's also important to note that there will be lots of English entries as well. Is there one collation I can use that will support both languages?


    Thanks, Sam
    • Edited by imsam67 Wednesday, October 26, 2011 11:19 PM
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 11:19 PM

Answers

  • You can use Unicode data types (nvarchar or nchar) to store both Japanese and English characters.  The collation determines the sorting an comparison rules for both Unicode and non-Unicode characters as well as the character set for non-Unicode columns.  If you've already installed SQL Server, setup defaults the instance collation based on the OS locale.  The instance collation is used by default for user databases and columns and is probably the one most appropriate.  If you use one language more than others you may want to specify a Windows collation corresponding to that language.

     

     

     

     


    Dan Guzman, SQL Server MVP, http://weblogs.sqlteam.com/dang/
    • Proposed as answer by Peja Tao Thursday, October 27, 2011 8:19 AM
    • Marked as answer by imsam67 Friday, October 28, 2011 8:26 PM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 1:22 AM

All replies

  • You can use Unicode data types (nvarchar or nchar) to store both Japanese and English characters.  The collation determines the sorting an comparison rules for both Unicode and non-Unicode characters as well as the character set for non-Unicode columns.  If you've already installed SQL Server, setup defaults the instance collation based on the OS locale.  The instance collation is used by default for user databases and columns and is probably the one most appropriate.  If you use one language more than others you may want to specify a Windows collation corresponding to that language.

     

     

     

     


    Dan Guzman, SQL Server MVP, http://weblogs.sqlteam.com/dang/
    • Proposed as answer by Peja Tao Thursday, October 27, 2011 8:19 AM
    • Marked as answer by imsam67 Friday, October 28, 2011 8:26 PM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 1:22 AM
  • Thank you very much for your answer.
    Thanks, Sam
    Friday, October 28, 2011 8:27 PM