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Shortening/Breaking a single Task Bar so that it isn't so long RRS feed

  • Question

  • I would like to know how to how to break a task bar so that it doesn't take up a whole page when you print out the Gantt chart. For example, I have a design and construction schedule for a commercial building that I need to put into a proposal. We are allowed two pages. When you look at the schedule there are maybe 40 tasks like "Preliminary Design Meeting", "Bidding", ect... Well these are all relatively short compared to the "Construction" Task which is going to take a year and a half. So when you print off the schedule two of the 4 pages are just one task bar running the entire length of the page. I would like to break that one task so that it is not soo long relative to the others. We have worked around this before by not printing the 2nd and 3rd pages which have just the one task on them, but in this particular case we can't do that without also eliminating other tasks. I hope you all understand what I'm getting at here. This problem keeps coming up and I cannot find a real solution. It would be cool if I could just change the timescale for that one task or put in a break line symbol to indicate a skip in time.
    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 8:41 PM

Answers

  • Grebiw,

    Sorry, Project isn't that cool. It would be kinda neat if it was though.

    I can think of a couple of options. First, adjust the timescale so the main effort (i.e. construction) fits on your two page limit. The short tasks will appear as "blips" in the timescale but those are probably minor supporting tasks anyway. Another option is to not use Project to print out the schedule for your proposal. After all, the main event here is the construction and if you are rolling that whole complex chain of activities into a single line then either that line is a summary line or the "schedule" you are putting in the proposal is really only a pretty picture. You might just want to draw it up using Visio or some graphic application and use that in the proposal.

    It is difficult to imagine that an RFP (Request for proposal) for a complex project limits prospective bidders to 2 pages for the schedule. Normally the schedule detail is a whole separate part of the proposal, often submitted in electronic form to the customer. There has to be enough detail information to show plausibility, otherwise how can the various bids be adequately evaluated.

    My thoughts.

    John

    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 11:11 PM
  • Hi Grebiw,
     
    Another option is to break down Construction into smaller sections �?? perhaps phase 1, 2, etc lasting a couple of months each.
     
    FAQs, companion products and other useful Project information can be seen at this web address:  http://project.mvps.org/faqs.htm
     
    Hope this helps - please let us know how you get on :)
     
    Mike Glen
    MS Project MVP
    See http://tinyurl.com/2xbhc for my free Project Tutorials
     

     
    "John - Project" wrote in message news:b81cb6bd-20a2-462c-9a90-b83df5d38f54@communitybridge.codeplex.com...
    Grebiw,

    Sorry, Project isn't that cool. It would be kinda neat if it was though.

    I can think of a couple of options. First, adjust the timescale so the main effort (i.e. construction) fits on your two page limit. The short tasks will appear as "blips" in the timescale but those are probably minor supporting tasks anyway. Another option is to not use Project to print out the schedule for your proposal. After all, the main event here is the construction and if you are rolling that whole complex chain of activities into a single line then either that line is a summary line or the "schedule" you are putting in the proposal is really only a pretty picture. You might just want to draw it up using Visio or some graphic application and use that in the proposal.

    It is difficult to imagine that an RFP (Request for proposal) for a complex project limits prospective bidders to 2 pages for the schedule. Normally the schedule detail is a whole separate part of the proposal, often submitted in electronic form to the customer. There has to be enough detail information to show plausibility, otherwise how can the various bids be adequately evaluated.

    My thoughts.

    John
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 7:35 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Grebiw,

    Sorry, Project isn't that cool. It would be kinda neat if it was though.

    I can think of a couple of options. First, adjust the timescale so the main effort (i.e. construction) fits on your two page limit. The short tasks will appear as "blips" in the timescale but those are probably minor supporting tasks anyway. Another option is to not use Project to print out the schedule for your proposal. After all, the main event here is the construction and if you are rolling that whole complex chain of activities into a single line then either that line is a summary line or the "schedule" you are putting in the proposal is really only a pretty picture. You might just want to draw it up using Visio or some graphic application and use that in the proposal.

    It is difficult to imagine that an RFP (Request for proposal) for a complex project limits prospective bidders to 2 pages for the schedule. Normally the schedule detail is a whole separate part of the proposal, often submitted in electronic form to the customer. There has to be enough detail information to show plausibility, otherwise how can the various bids be adequately evaluated.

    My thoughts.

    John

    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 11:11 PM
  • Hi Grebiw,
     
    Another option is to break down Construction into smaller sections �?? perhaps phase 1, 2, etc lasting a couple of months each.
     
    FAQs, companion products and other useful Project information can be seen at this web address:  http://project.mvps.org/faqs.htm
     
    Hope this helps - please let us know how you get on :)
     
    Mike Glen
    MS Project MVP
    See http://tinyurl.com/2xbhc for my free Project Tutorials
     

     
    "John - Project" wrote in message news:b81cb6bd-20a2-462c-9a90-b83df5d38f54@communitybridge.codeplex.com...
    Grebiw,

    Sorry, Project isn't that cool. It would be kinda neat if it was though.

    I can think of a couple of options. First, adjust the timescale so the main effort (i.e. construction) fits on your two page limit. The short tasks will appear as "blips" in the timescale but those are probably minor supporting tasks anyway. Another option is to not use Project to print out the schedule for your proposal. After all, the main event here is the construction and if you are rolling that whole complex chain of activities into a single line then either that line is a summary line or the "schedule" you are putting in the proposal is really only a pretty picture. You might just want to draw it up using Visio or some graphic application and use that in the proposal.

    It is difficult to imagine that an RFP (Request for proposal) for a complex project limits prospective bidders to 2 pages for the schedule. Normally the schedule detail is a whole separate part of the proposal, often submitted in electronic form to the customer. There has to be enough detail information to show plausibility, otherwise how can the various bids be adequately evaluated.

    My thoughts.

    John
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 7:35 AM
    Moderator