locked
Disk space storage question RRS feed

  • Question

  • We are contemplating about pushing windows updates onto the workstations through our corporate LAN & WAN.  Upto this point, updates have been installed individually per machine (with Automatic Updates turned on) so I am not sure how much disk space this will cost us if we decide to push it out through the network.  We have a mix of users on WinXP/Win7.

    My question is initially how much hard drive space we will need on the server and then on a on-going basis how much to allocate for the 2 windows platforms.

    All XP machines have SP3/ All Win7 machines have SP1 installed so atleast those 2 monstrous updates can be excluded from the list of updates to be installed.
    Saturday, January 12, 2013 12:59 AM

Answers

  • Am 15.01.2013 schrieb Maverick.69:

    No, we were not planning on pushing out any drivers so that will be a non-factor.   So to answer your question, it will be updates and security updates. 

    OK.

    How much disk space total should I plan on with the products that i specified in my previous reply?  First I thought 20 GB should be more than enough but someone in this thread mentioned a 100 GB?? 

    Maybe with 40-50 GB will be OK. Think about Servicepacks! Do you have
    Servers?

    Wow... that's a lot of space just for some updates!!  I've never had to do this before but good lord... 100 GB seems rather high.  If we choose a middle point somewhere between 20 & 100 GB - that is around 60 GB.  What do you think?

    Should be OK. ;)

    Winfried


    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/bb332157.aspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home

    • Marked as answer by Maverick.69 Tuesday, January 15, 2013 2:55 PM
    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 6:08 AM

All replies

  • Am 12.01.2013 schrieb Maverick.69:

    We are contemplating about pushing windows updates onto the workstations through our corporate LAN & WAN.  Upto this point, updates have been installed individually per machine (with Automatic Updates turned on) so I am not sure how much disk space this will cost us if we decide to push it out through the network.  We have a mix of users on WinXP/Win7.

    My question is initially how much hard drive space we will need on the server and then on a on-going basis how much to allocate for the 2 windows platforms.

    How many products you have selected? How many languages you have
    selected?

    All XP machines have SP3/ All Win7 machines have SP1 installed so atleast those 2 monstrous updates can be excluded from the list of updates to be installed.

    What categories you will select?

    Winfried


    http://www.microsoft.com/germany/windowsserver2003/technologien/updateservices/default.mspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home
    Reg2xml:  http://www.reg2xml.com - Registry Export File Converter

    Saturday, January 12, 2013 1:33 PM
  • Winfried is right in that the disk requirement really does depend on the products, categories and languages you select. I would plan for a server with around 100 GB of storage to give yourselves growing room. In Windows Server 2012, WSUS also does rather nicely as a VM with an expanding VHD storage so you can incrementally add more updates and only allocate the disk space for the WSUS server as-needed.
    Monday, January 14, 2013 8:54 AM
  • How many products you have selected? How many languages you have

    selected?

    Win 7 Pro; Win XP Pro; Office 2007 Pro (outlook/ word/ excel / powerpoint/ access/ publisher);  .NET framework v3 and v4... probably a couple of others I may have missed but those would be the primary ones.

    As for the languages - only 1 (english).

    What categories you will select?

    Winfried

    Winfried - I am new to this so I am not sure what you mean by categories.

    Monday, January 14, 2013 4:39 PM
  • Do you need the drivers too? That would add considerably to the space requirements.

    Monday, January 14, 2013 8:05 PM
  • Am 14.01.2013 schrieb Maverick.69:

    Winfried - I am new to this so I am not sure what you mean by categories.

    Sorry, you can select Updates, security Updates, but don't select
    drivers.

    One important thing, don't approve Updates without a requirement of a
    computer. So you can save space on the disk. ;)

    Winfried


    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/bb332157.aspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home

    Monday, January 14, 2013 8:57 PM
  • Am 14.01.2013 schrieb Maverick.69:

    Winfried - I am new to this so I am not sure what you mean by categories.

    Sorry, you can select Updates, security Updates, but don't select
    drivers.

    One important thing, don't approve Updates without a requirement of a
    computer. So you can save space on the disk. ;)

    Winfried


    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/bb332157.aspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home

    No, we were not planning on pushing out any drivers so that will be a non-factor.   So to answer your question, it will be updates and security updates. 

    How much disk space total should I plan on with the products that i specified in my previous reply?  First I thought 20 GB should be more than enough but someone in this thread mentioned a 100 GB??  Wow... that's a lot of space just for some updates!!  I've never had to do this before but good lord... 100 GB seems rather high.  If we choose a middle point somewhere between 20 & 100 GB - that is around 60 GB.  What do you think?

    Monday, January 14, 2013 11:55 PM
  • Am 15.01.2013 schrieb Maverick.69:

    No, we were not planning on pushing out any drivers so that will be a non-factor.   So to answer your question, it will be updates and security updates. 

    OK.

    How much disk space total should I plan on with the products that i specified in my previous reply?  First I thought 20 GB should be more than enough but someone in this thread mentioned a 100 GB?? 

    Maybe with 40-50 GB will be OK. Think about Servicepacks! Do you have
    Servers?

    Wow... that's a lot of space just for some updates!!  I've never had to do this before but good lord... 100 GB seems rather high.  If we choose a middle point somewhere between 20 & 100 GB - that is around 60 GB.  What do you think?

    Should be OK. ;)

    Winfried


    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/bb332157.aspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home

    • Marked as answer by Maverick.69 Tuesday, January 15, 2013 2:55 PM
    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 6:08 AM
  • Am 15.01.2013 schrieb Maverick.69:

    How much disk space total should I plan on with the products that i specified in my previous reply?  First I thought 20 GB should be more than enough but someone in this thread mentioned a 100 GB??  Wow... that's a lot of space just for some updates!!  I've never had to do this before but good lord... 100 GB seems rather high.  If we choose a middle point somewhere between 20 & 100 GB - that is around 60 GB.  What do you think?

    Think about the Server Cleanup Wizard. With a Powershell Script, you
    can use it daily in a scheduled Task, your WSUS-Content will cleanup
    daily. For more informationes use the Cleanup Wizard and read the
    explains.

    Winfried


    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/bb332157.aspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 6:15 AM
  • 20 GB is less than the total recommended amount of disk space for Windows Server 2012!

    You will probably be OK with 60 GB but if you do want breathing room (especially if you decide to add another product, 3rd party backup agents, etc. to your WSUS server) I would recommend 80 or 100 GB. If you are installing in a VM, why not create an expanding VHD disk to keep the updates on?

    Note that WSUS will only clean out updates that are 30 days past expiration, to ensure that it has had ample time to remove the superseded updates from all client computers.

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 6:19 AM
  • Think about the Server Cleanup Wizard. With a Powershell Script, you

    can use it daily in a scheduled Task, your WSUS-Content will cleanup
    daily. For more informationes use the Cleanup Wizard and read the
    explains.

    Winfried


    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/bb332157.aspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home

    Thanks for the suggestion Winfried.  I am going to go with 50 GB for the time being.  I don't think service packs will be too much of a factor; all the machines we deploy already have SP 3 for XP / SP 1 for Win 7.

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 2:38 PM
  • 20 GB is less than the total recommended amount of disk space for Windows Server 2012!

    You will probably be OK with 60 GB but if you do want breathing room (especially if you decide to add another product, 3rd party backup agents, etc. to your WSUS server) I would recommend 80 or 100 GB. If you are installing in a VM, why not create an expanding VHD disk to keep the updates on?

    Note that WSUS will only clean out updates that are 30 days past expiration, to ensure that it has had ample time to remove the superseded updates from all client computers.

    Add another MS product?  Doubtful.  (not for us anyway).  We have several dedicated servers with some amount of decent room, I think 50 GB will be good enough for the time being and we can increase to 80 GB when the time comes.  For now we are talking about simple updates/ security updates for the products that I've explained above.  The only service pack to worry about will be Win 7 SP 2 if and when that comes around.


    Note that WSUS will only clean out updates that are 30 days past expiration, to ensure that it has had ample time to remove the superseded updates from all client computers.

    I am new to this but I have a feeling you are talking about some feature of WSUS that will automatically purge old updates?  Or are you talking about the cleanup wizard in Winfried's reply above?


    • Edited by Maverick.69 Tuesday, January 15, 2013 2:45 PM
    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 2:45 PM
  • Am 15.01.2013 schrieb Maverick.69:

    Note that WSUS will only clean out updates that are 30 days past expiration, to ensure that it has had ample time to remove the superseded updates from all client computers.

    I am new to this but I have a feeling you are talking about some feature of WSUS that will automatically purge old updates?  Or are you talking about the cleanup wizard in Winfried's reply above?

    Yes, he is talking about the cleanup wizard.

    Winfried


    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/bb332157.aspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 6:33 PM
  • Am 15.01.2013 schrieb Maverick.69:

    Thanks for the suggestion Winfried.  I am going to go with 50 GB for the time being.  I don't think service packs will be too much of a factor; all the machines we deploy already have SP 3 for XP / SP 1 for Win 7.

    OK, have a goog time with WSUS. :)

    Winfried


    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/bb332157.aspx
    http://www.wsuswiki.com/Home

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 6:34 PM
  • If you only approve updates for XP from after SP3, then you will save a bunch of space vs. syncing all XP updates.
    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 6:48 PM
  • I set this up in a VM today and I am at 32.4 GB used with WS 2012 + Updates + the selected products in English that you have specified above. So your initial setting of 50 GB should be fine.

    Regards,
    Ben

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013 11:03 PM
  • Do you need the drivers too? That would add considerably to the space requirements.

    There are very few, if any, drivers that can be installed from WSUS.

    Also you should ABSOLUTELY NOT automatically approve updates. For one, if you do that you have a much higher chance of updates causing problems... wait a few days first, and second is that WSUS can not properly manage updates so if you do automatic approvals you will have many obsolete updates approved by the automatic approval process. And then there are the updates that are absolutly not needed and are borderline malware like the Windows Genuine Advantage "Updates" that do things like create scheduled tasks that are of no benefit to you.

    Saturday, January 19, 2013 4:59 AM
  • I would plan for a server with around 100 GB of storage to give yourselves growing room.

    Seriously!?

    I contend that anything more than =10GB= of file consumption is excessive.


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2013)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of SolarWinds.


    Saturday, February 2, 2013 10:42 PM
  • I would plan for a server with around 100 GB of storage to give yourselves growing room.

    Seriously!?

    I contend that anything more than =10GB= of file consumption is excessive.


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2013)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of SolarWinds.


    Windows Server itself requires 32 GB. 

    Server Core is 6 GB + page file; you're already at 10 GB right there.  And I'd contend that most WSUS users aren't running WSUS on Server Core. 

    As the PM for Server Core (in addition to WSUS), I am looking at ways of making Windows Server (and WSUS) smaller and lighter-weight. More on that another day, though :-)

    Saturday, February 2, 2013 10:45 PM
  • Note that WSUS will only clean out updates that are 30 days past expiration, to ensure that it has had ample time to remove the superseded updates from all client computers.

    I am new to this but I have a feeling you are talking about some feature of WSUS that will automatically purge old updates?  Or are you talking about the cleanup wizard in Winfried's reply above?

    Yes, as noted, he's talking about the Server Cleanup Wizard, but the phrase "that are 30 days past expiration" is somewhat simplistic, I think.

    The Server Cleanup Wizard will:

    1. Delete computers that have not contacted the WSUS server in more than 30 days (if you want).

    2. Decline any expired updates that are not approved (if you want). (You can also decline these manually at any time from the console, but the SCW will decline any expired update, regardless of when it was expired.)

    3. Decline any superseded updates that are not approved, provided that the superseding update is approved and the superseded update has not been needed by a computer or downstream server (if you want). (You can also decline these manually at any time from the console, and I will point out that it's actually more effective to manage this directly, and use the Server Cleanup Wizard as a catch-all for something that you might have missed along the way.)

    4a. Delete updates from the database that are expired and have not been approved for more than 3 months (if you want).

    4b. Delete updates from the database that are old revisions of updates that have not been approved for more than 30 days (if you want).

    5. Delete FILES associated with any deleted or declined update.

    I tagged all of those with "if you want" because each of those five options can be run optionally, independently, or simultaneously.

    The functionality of #5 (which is what contributes to the aggressive management of file consumption) benefits best from the manual and aggressive management of the operation discussed in #3.

    Also, the operations described in #4a and #4b are the most database intense, because they require significant joins to inspect and validate the approval state and approval history, plus the actual operation of physically removing rows from a multitude of tables. In many instances, running the "[Delete] Unused updates and update revisions" option as a separate task, after running the other four options -- particularly where the SCW has not been used in a long time -- can be beneficial. It will take a long time to run, in some cases, so I also suggest running it at the end of the day on Friday, and then go home, such that you won't be tempted to be frustrated by the fact that it's still running after a few hours -- which it may well be doing.

    Finally, there is also the possibility that the console will time-out if that task takes too long to run. There are a couple of work-arounds for this. You can invoke the "Delete updates" functionality of the SCW through the WSUS API, and there are scripts available (in Codeplex and other places) to do this. Also, there are third party products that will allow you to schedule the execution of the SCW as a recurring maintenance task.




    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2013)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of SolarWinds.

    Saturday, February 2, 2013 10:56 PM