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In Place Upgrade of 2008 R2 DC to 2012 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm interested if there are any concerns or gotchas when upgrading a 2008 R2 SP1 DC to 2012. This is a Hyper-V guest; I have another DC as a guest on another host. Services on this DC include:

    • DHCP
    • DNS
    • All the FSMO roles

    I want to do an in-place upgrade on this "PDC" box. Will I run into any issues that will crash my network?

    Note we also have Exchange 2010 running. And I'm getting ready to install SharePoint--2010 OR 2013 (probably the latter?...). I've already built the SQL Server 2012 box to support SharePoint.

    Thanks in advance for any tips or warnings you might be able to offer. I read one post somewhere else that the upgrade of a similar VM went flawlessly and took about 15mins. That was a thread from last August.

    Cheers!


    Noel Stanford Oveson
    jeremyNLSO
    MCTS, MCITP, CCENT, CNE, MCSE, CLSE
    Berlin, Germany

    Thursday, February 14, 2013 9:16 AM

Answers

  • Should work without a problem, though my preference would be to build a 2012 system from scratch and promote it to a domain controller in your domain, then retire the existing DC.  I have never been a fan of inplace upgrades; always like to start fresh when given the option.

    But, if you want to do an inplace upgrade, here's an article - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh994618


    .:|:.:|:. tim


    • Edited by Tim CerlingMVP Thursday, February 14, 2013 1:53 PM
    • Marked as answer by ArchiTech89 Thursday, February 14, 2013 7:50 PM
    Thursday, February 14, 2013 1:50 PM

All replies

  • Should work without a problem, though my preference would be to build a 2012 system from scratch and promote it to a domain controller in your domain, then retire the existing DC.  I have never been a fan of inplace upgrades; always like to start fresh when given the option.

    But, if you want to do an inplace upgrade, here's an article - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh994618


    .:|:.:|:. tim


    • Edited by Tim CerlingMVP Thursday, February 14, 2013 1:53 PM
    • Marked as answer by ArchiTech89 Thursday, February 14, 2013 7:50 PM
    Thursday, February 14, 2013 1:50 PM
  • Tim... I like your reasoning. But if I did that, how would I keep the same naming convention? Just rename the server beforehand?

    Also, if I did that, I would want to build the clean server, promote it to DC, then move DNS, DHCP, GC, and the FSMO roles, etc. over to it before retiring the old machine. Is that a relatively straightforward process, or would it entail some intricate effort?

    I'd like to do this in one night, if possible.

    Note that, while in a production environment, it's a relatively clean system. There's not a whole lot that's been introduced besides the MS products that play relatively nice w/one another.

    Thanks...


    Noel Stanford Oveson
    jeremyNLSO
    MCTS, MCITP, CCENT, CNE, MCSE, CLSE
    Berlin, Germany


    • Edited by ArchiTech89 Thursday, February 14, 2013 4:29 PM
    Thursday, February 14, 2013 4:27 PM
  • Active Directory is a multi-master implementation.  This means that when you add a new DC to the domain, all information from the current AD is replicated to the DC just added.  If you are using integrated DNS (highly recommended), you don't have to do anything to replicate DNS.  Same with global catalog.  FSMO roles can either be transferred while both hosts are running, or they will be automatically transferred when you demote your current DC.  AD is designed, in fact, it is highly recommended, to have at least two DCs.  This ensures continuity with no interaction, should something happen to one DC.  So you can run the two DCs side-by-side with no problem for as long as you want, giving you plenty of time to get things moved over.

    DHCP is a bit different, depending upon how you have set it up.  Tools are available to move it.  But if you have a very simple DHCP, it only takes a couple minutes to set up manually.  That's the beauty of the DHCP lease.  The next time a machine needs a new DHCP address, it simply makes a request and gets the new DHCP server.

    Not sure about your naming conventions.  Are people actually accessing the DC by a specific name?  For most things, the name of the DC is not relevant.  As a user, there is never a reason for them to even know what the name of the DC is.  But, because it really doesn't make a difference, if you absolutely want to rename it afterwards, feel free.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Thursday, February 14, 2013 4:59 PM