locked
Windows 2012 R2 print server cannot tell when printers are offline RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi --

    I have a Windows 2012 R2 server. Its print server defines and controls six TCP/IP network printers, all connected on the same subnet as the server.

    The server is seemingly unable to tell when a printer is offline. If I take a printer offline from its control panel, even though the printer is not accepting jobs the print server still shows it as Ready. If I physically disconnect the printer from the network, the print server still shows it as Ready even though the server itself cannot ping that printer.

    We're not sure why this is happening, or how to fix it. But it is affecting our ability to pool two of these network printers. When we create a pooled queue using two of the laser printers, all the print jobs go to the first printer on the list. If we take that printer offline, the print jobs just don't print. When that printer comes back online, the print jobs print to that printer. The second printer never receives any print jobs, even though it may be the only one in the pool that's physically connected to the network.

    How do we fix this? How is it that the print server cannot tell whether its printers are offline or not?

    Thanks
    CL

    Friday, November 20, 2015 10:47 AM

Answers

  • An Offline printer will always accept new jobs.  We are not sure what you are attempting to accomplish.

    Once you share the printer it is ALWAYS available to accept new print jobs.  Whether these jobs can be scheduled by the print spooler service is a separate task.

    Pooled printing is even more complex but in general when the Standard TCP/IP port monitor marks the Port as Offline, the spooler will schedule the print job to the next available port in the port list.

    It must be using the Microsoft Standard TCP/IP Port for pooling to reschedule failed jobs to the next port in the list.  By default, the spooler will schedule ALL print jobs to the FIRST port in the port list.  This is alphabetic / numeric.  If the first port is busy, then the job will be scheduled to the next port in the list.

    The end result is that 90% of the print jobs will go to the first device in the port list.


    Alan Morris formerly with Windows Printing Team

    • Proposed as answer by Elaine Jing Monday, November 23, 2015 9:57 AM
    • Marked as answer by Elaine Jing Thursday, November 26, 2015 9:22 AM
    Sunday, November 22, 2015 5:11 AM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Hi Chuck,

    when you look at the properties of offending printers, select the 'Ports' tab and 'Configure Port', what do you see for "SNMP Status Enabled"?  Is this box checked?   

    Friday, November 20, 2015 12:11 PM
  • Yes. It is enabled. But we get the same results if it is disabled.

    Thanks

    CL

    Friday, November 20, 2015 4:22 PM
  • An Offline printer will always accept new jobs.  We are not sure what you are attempting to accomplish.

    Once you share the printer it is ALWAYS available to accept new print jobs.  Whether these jobs can be scheduled by the print spooler service is a separate task.

    Pooled printing is even more complex but in general when the Standard TCP/IP port monitor marks the Port as Offline, the spooler will schedule the print job to the next available port in the port list.

    It must be using the Microsoft Standard TCP/IP Port for pooling to reschedule failed jobs to the next port in the list.  By default, the spooler will schedule ALL print jobs to the FIRST port in the port list.  This is alphabetic / numeric.  If the first port is busy, then the job will be scheduled to the next port in the list.

    The end result is that 90% of the print jobs will go to the first device in the port list.


    Alan Morris formerly with Windows Printing Team

    • Proposed as answer by Elaine Jing Monday, November 23, 2015 9:57 AM
    • Marked as answer by Elaine Jing Thursday, November 26, 2015 9:22 AM
    Sunday, November 22, 2015 5:11 AM
    Answerer