locked
MDOP vs. RDS RRS feed

  • Question

  • Dear Guys,

    Is anyone aware of the difference between RDS and MDOP (Microsoft Desktop Optimization pack which includes App-V and Enterprise Desktop Virtualization)?

    As far as I know the RDS can provide virtualized Apps and Desktops; in the meantime the MDOP provides App-V (Application Virtualizatio) and MDEV (Enterprise Desktop Virtualization) -- are them doing the same thing effectively?

    Thanks,

    Leon Li

    Tuesday, May 28, 2013 4:50 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    A RDS CAL includes rights to use App-V along with RDS if you wish.

    The technologies you listed are similar, but different.  Below are some brief explanation of each:

    Remote Desktop Services (VDI) - In general, RDS gives you the ability to publish full desktops and RemoteApps and make them available using Remote Desktop.  The desktops or RemoteApps may run under RDSH (see below) or on a Windows 7 Enterprise or Windows 8 Enterprise VM.  The desktops/applications are running remotely on the server (RDSH) or remotely on a desktop OS VM (Win7/Win8).

    Remote Desktop Session Host (RDSH) - Works like a multi-user workstation.  Many users can connect to the server using Remote Desktop and run applications that are installed locally on the server (or published via App-V).  The applications are running on the server; the user is only viewing screen updates and sending keystrokes/mouse/etc. back to the server.  The user may get a full desktop or run the applications using RemoteApp, which makes the apps appear to be running on their local PC.

    App-V - Applications are packaged so that they can typically be deployed to workstations or RDSH servers without the need to install the application locally on the device.  App-V has virtualization technology that allows each app to run sandboxed so that if you need it to the application will not save/modify the files/registry of the PC it is running on but actually save to the app's own virtual environment.

    This allows you to do things you otherwise would not be able to do like run two different versions of the same application on a single PC (often you cannot do this do to registry/file conflicts between two versions of the same app).  Also the benefit of not having to install the applications on each PC/server and having a central mechanism to manage/deploy applications is a big help for certain environments.

    MED-V - Allows applications to be run in a WinXP VM running under Virtual PC on the local workstation.  The applications appear to running as normal applications, however, they are actually running in a VM.  This is similar to RemoteApps but in this case the application is actually running on the local PC.

    -TP

    • Proposed as answer by TP []MVP Tuesday, May 28, 2013 7:01 AM
    • Marked as answer by Clarence Zhang Tuesday, June 4, 2013 1:36 AM
    Tuesday, May 28, 2013 6:28 AM
  • Hi,

    For questions regarding App-V it is best to ask in the App-V Forum--they can help you decide how many VMs you need for the different App-V components.  You need to install the appropriate App-V client on the devices that you plan to run App-V packages on.

    MDOP is essentially a collection of separate software packages that you may use (or not use).  For example, you may decide that there is no need for MED-V in your environment.

    -TP

    Tuesday, May 28, 2013 7:00 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    A RDS CAL includes rights to use App-V along with RDS if you wish.

    The technologies you listed are similar, but different.  Below are some brief explanation of each:

    Remote Desktop Services (VDI) - In general, RDS gives you the ability to publish full desktops and RemoteApps and make them available using Remote Desktop.  The desktops or RemoteApps may run under RDSH (see below) or on a Windows 7 Enterprise or Windows 8 Enterprise VM.  The desktops/applications are running remotely on the server (RDSH) or remotely on a desktop OS VM (Win7/Win8).

    Remote Desktop Session Host (RDSH) - Works like a multi-user workstation.  Many users can connect to the server using Remote Desktop and run applications that are installed locally on the server (or published via App-V).  The applications are running on the server; the user is only viewing screen updates and sending keystrokes/mouse/etc. back to the server.  The user may get a full desktop or run the applications using RemoteApp, which makes the apps appear to be running on their local PC.

    App-V - Applications are packaged so that they can typically be deployed to workstations or RDSH servers without the need to install the application locally on the device.  App-V has virtualization technology that allows each app to run sandboxed so that if you need it to the application will not save/modify the files/registry of the PC it is running on but actually save to the app's own virtual environment.

    This allows you to do things you otherwise would not be able to do like run two different versions of the same application on a single PC (often you cannot do this do to registry/file conflicts between two versions of the same app).  Also the benefit of not having to install the applications on each PC/server and having a central mechanism to manage/deploy applications is a big help for certain environments.

    MED-V - Allows applications to be run in a WinXP VM running under Virtual PC on the local workstation.  The applications appear to running as normal applications, however, they are actually running in a VM.  This is similar to RemoteApps but in this case the application is actually running on the local PC.

    -TP

    • Proposed as answer by TP []MVP Tuesday, May 28, 2013 7:01 AM
    • Marked as answer by Clarence Zhang Tuesday, June 4, 2013 1:36 AM
    Tuesday, May 28, 2013 6:28 AM
  • Hi,

    A RDS CAL includes rights to use App-V along with RDS if you wish.

    The technologies you listed are similar, but different.  Below are some brief explanation of each:

    Remote Desktop Services (VDI) - In general, RDS gives you the ability to publish full desktops and RemoteApps and make them available using Remote Desktop.  The desktops or RemoteApps may run under RDSH (see below) or on a Windows 7 Enterprise or Windows 8 Enterprise VM.  The desktops/applications are running remotely on the server (RDSH) or remotely on a desktop OS VM (Win7/Win8).

    Remote Desktop Session Host (RDSH) - Works like a multi-user workstation.  Many users can connect to the server using Remote Desktop and run applications that are installed locally on the server (or published via App-V).  The applications are running on the server; the user is only viewing screen updates and sending keystrokes/mouse/etc. back to the server.  The user may get a full desktop or run the applications using RemoteApp, which makes the apps appear to be running on their local PC.

    App-V - Applications are packaged so that they can typically be deployed to workstations or RDSH servers without the need to install the application locally on the device.  App-V has virtualization technology that allows each app to run sandboxed so that if you need it to the application will not save/modify the files/registry of the PC it is running on but actually save to the app's own virtual environment.

    This allows you to do things you otherwise would not be able to do like run two different versions of the same application on a single PC (often you cannot do this do to registry/file conflicts between two versions of the same app).  Also the benefit of not having to install the applications on each PC/server and having a central mechanism to manage/deploy applications is a big help for certain environments.

    MED-V - Allows applications to be run in a WinXP VM running under Virtual PC on the local workstation.  The applications appear to running as normal applications, however, they are actually running in a VM.  This is similar to RemoteApps but in this case the application is actually running on the local PC.

    -TP

    Thanks very much TP.

    Now I have a workstation running Hyper-V and RDS in domain; I suppose I can also install the MDOP management server on it for App-V and use a Hyper-V VM for sequencer, correct?

    One thing I'm not quite sure is the MDOP client: for RDS we can use Web Access to run publishd desktops/Apps; for MDOP is there a similar way or has it to be a Windows machine with MDOP client software installed?

    Regards,

    Leon Li

    Tuesday, May 28, 2013 6:38 AM
  • Hi,

    For questions regarding App-V it is best to ask in the App-V Forum--they can help you decide how many VMs you need for the different App-V components.  You need to install the appropriate App-V client on the devices that you plan to run App-V packages on.

    MDOP is essentially a collection of separate software packages that you may use (or not use).  For example, you may decide that there is no need for MED-V in your environment.

    -TP

    Tuesday, May 28, 2013 7:00 AM