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SCCM OS deployment, Windows 7, howto customize the OS? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    Please advise howto customize a build and caputre task sequence (Windows 7), f.e.

    -small icons instead of large ones
    -enable telnet
    -...

    If possible, it probably takes a lot of work to configure.
    Why not use the audit mode of Windows, then capture this image with imageX?

    Note: another thing: when migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7 (our case), how can you make sure pc's keep their name? You import the pc's based upon mac-address but then ...?

    J.


    Jan Hoedt

    Thursday, July 25, 2013 3:41 PM

Answers

  • With Unattend.xml you can configure some settings, but not all.. get Windows ADK to get started with sysprep xml files, you'll see what you can and what you cannot do with it.

    For everything else, use the custom commandlines (like for example the settings for small icons) that modify the registry of the default user profile or the computer registry.

    • Proposed as answer by Narcoticoo Friday, July 26, 2013 4:01 PM
    • Marked as answer by janhoedt Monday, July 29, 2013 1:12 PM
    Friday, July 26, 2013 4:01 PM

All replies

  • I can't help with the customization question at the moment as im not entirely sure of what your asking but...

    as per you question regarding machine import... I would do a discovery of these systems (AD, or IP range.. whichever works for you) as opposed to 'Import Computer Information'.

    So long as you're not doing any autonaming in your task sequence the computers name will remain the same.

    Thursday, July 25, 2013 5:50 PM
  • First note that Windows customization is really a Windows issue and not in any way specific to ConfigMgr or OSD.

    The best way is to not do customization: http://blogs.technet.com/b/fdcc/archive/2010/10/06/sticking-with-well-known-and-proven-solutions.aspx

    For example, who really cares if you have small of large icons? That sounds like someone's personal preference and you are going to spend time and money changing your entire process for someone's personal preference?

    As for customizations that you *must* have, it all depends on the customization. Some folks will tell you to use the CopyProfile feature of Windows and manually configure the settings that you want. For many reasons, that path is terrible IMO as it is flaky and completely undefined as to what it actually copies. IMO, automating all of the customizations is the best way to go. Now, how exactly you do that is based upopn each setting itself. Many/Most settings are simply registry values. Others can be configured via unattend.xml or PowerShell or WMI or some other facility. You just have to use your Windows experience and knowledge and Bing to find out how to change/configure those settings.


    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com

    • Proposed as answer by TorstenMMVP Thursday, July 25, 2013 9:05 PM
    Thursday, July 25, 2013 6:43 PM
  • You can enable telnet client (if that is what you want) pretty easily with dism commands. Just add feature to the wim and then remember to commit the change.

    About small icons, I would prefer group policies, if there is any to do that. This is something that I would not want to be customized inside the image, wim file.


    Thursday, July 25, 2013 9:40 PM
  • I prefer using automation wherever it's possible, if you use audit mode, you don't get the same results (everyone is not perfect) everytime, that's why automation is way much better, you get exactly what you wanted every time.

    You can edit the user profiles by this mechanism (after setup os and configmgr client):

    1. Run A Commandline: reg.exe LOAD HKU\Default %windir%\..\Users\Default\NTuser.dat
    2. Run A Commandline: reg.exe ADD HKU\Default\Somekey /v SomeValueName /t REG_DWORD /d SomeValue /f
    3. Run A Commandline: reg.exe UNLOAD HKU\Default

    Basicly the above commands load the default user's registry (which is copied to everyone who logs to the computer) into a temp registry hive and then you can modify it from there, last step is to unload it. You can test these commands from the commandline on your working os. The settings to modify, you can find them with Google, also some settings are stored in the computer's registry (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE) and it can be modified straightly from the command line using the same method as described in the 2nd line above.

    For telnet, you have do this with dism, it can be done in the fullos or in WinPE phase.. the command for fullos is (run commandline step):

    dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:TelnetClient

    Here's a good one for adding language packs during OSD:

    http://blog.coretech.dk/mip/install-os-language-during-osd-the-easy-way-part-1inject-language-files/

    Hopefully this helps!

    • Proposed as answer by Narcoticoo Friday, July 26, 2013 7:17 AM
    Friday, July 26, 2013 7:17 AM
  • Please clarify this.

    "I would do a discovery of these systems (AD, or IP range ..."

    => OS-es can be deployed to unknown computers but how can they be discovered when they are not in SCCM? Therefore an import of their mac-address is needed.
    (To clarify: currently we have SCCM 2007 with Windows XP client, we are setting up SCCM 2012 with Windows 7 clients. Goal is to reinstall each client one by one to Windows 7 then pointing to SCCM 2012).

    "So long as you're not doing any autonaming in your task sequence the computers name will remain the same."
    => how can computernames in the described situation remain the same? we should have a link between mac addresses and pc-names OR names of pc's have to be added manually, right?


    Jan Hoedt

    Friday, July 26, 2013 8:07 AM
  • What about the unattend.xml?
    Maybe I better create another question for that but how do you create them and append them (step "Use an unattended or Sysprep answer file" in task sequence "Apply Operating System"?



    Jan Hoedt

    Friday, July 26, 2013 8:47 AM
  • to create and use an unattend.xml file for certain settings see this post, obviously replace windows 8 with whatever version of Windows 7 you are using.


    Step by Step Configuration Manager Guides > 2012 Guides | 2007 Guides | I'm on Twitter > ncbrady

    Friday, July 26, 2013 9:00 AM
  • Thanks! So, you need this unattend.xml, iow it is best practises for a task sequence and there are no other ways to configure, right?


    Jan Hoedt

    Friday, July 26, 2013 9:27 AM
  • With Unattend.xml you can configure some settings, but not all.. get Windows ADK to get started with sysprep xml files, you'll see what you can and what you cannot do with it.

    For everything else, use the custom commandlines (like for example the settings for small icons) that modify the registry of the default user profile or the computer registry.

    • Proposed as answer by Narcoticoo Friday, July 26, 2013 4:01 PM
    • Marked as answer by janhoedt Monday, July 29, 2013 1:12 PM
    Friday, July 26, 2013 4:01 PM
  • Thanks. Found some info on this: http://www.bohack.com/2011/01/how-to-make-an-unattend-xml-sysprep-file/

    However, where does this syprep xml differs with unattend.xml? You need both, you need only one of both?

    J.


    Jan Hoedt

    Monday, July 29, 2013 9:15 AM
  • It doesn't and you don't -- they are the same thing. Calling it an sysprep file is a misnomer carried over from the XP days -- it really has nothing to do with sysprep. As implied by its name, it is a file to drive unattended installation and setup of a Windows instance.

    The best place for information on the unattend.xml file is the help file for the Windows System Image Manager which is part of the WAIK and WADK.

    Also note that is you do not supply an unattend.xml file to the task sequence, a default one will be generated by the task sequence engine and that even if you do supply one, the ts engine will modify it.


    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com

    Monday, July 29, 2013 1:31 PM