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Troubleshooting transaction log growth / rapid disk space consumption RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi

    We are running SBS server 2008 with Exchange 2007 sp3 for a number of years.

    Recently we have discovered that our disk space has been reducing quite rapidly. This drive is dedicated to our Exchange server database, log files, and share files.

    We believe the issue is related to the transaction logs , because when we switch on circular logging for the First Storage Group the free disk space stabilises to around 136GB.

    yesterday afternoon we switched off circular logging on the first storage group. This morning (approx 3am GMT) Symantec reported a successful backup, thus purging the  transaction logs for yesterday.

    Since this morning our disk space has reduced from 136GB to 127GB. So in about 4 hours we have lost 9GB. It appears that there are approx 11-15 transaction logs generated every minute at 1mb in size . This doesn't seem right. In fact I have never monitored , so not entirely sure. 

    I have executed EXMON, and have noticed that there is a user name labelled "?" with an IP of 192.168.0.10 (which is the same IP address as the exchange sevrer) which appears to be constanting sitting around the top of CPU consumption - floating between 7% - 15% CPU usage. I'm a bit concerned to what this could be, and whether it is contributing to transaction log growth.


    I have also checked the IIS Worker Processes , and all the pools are sitting under 1% CPU usage, so don't think it is related to Activesync.

    The only thing we have changed in the last few weeks is increasing the physical ram from 16GB to 32GB , and increase the information store memory usage from 700MB to 3GB . Not sure if this has any impact on transaction logs? 

    Any ideas what could be the issue?


    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 11:08 AM

Answers

  • You're right, it can be hard to nail this down.

    1. You can look in the IIS logs.  Are they unusually large as well?

    3. A growth of log files means you have transactions being processed.  That number may be small or it may be large depending on your amount of expected traffic.  That number doesn't seem large to me, but maybe my experiences are with larger environments than yours.

    4. Sure there are.  You're welcome to search for them.


    Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."

    • Marked as answer by Lynn-Li Tuesday, August 4, 2015 9:25 AM
    Thursday, July 23, 2015 3:58 PM

All replies

  • You may have a mail loop, which you might be able to see in the SMTP queue viewer.  Look at your mailbox sizes and see if any of them is experiencing unusual growth.  If so, you can block access to it until you can stop whatever is going on.

    You could also have a runaway client or mobile device, which also can be remedied by access restrictions.


    Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."

    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 6:16 PM
  • Hi

    Many thanks for your reply.

    The difficulties are trying to track down this issue.

    1. How do we identify a  runaway client or mobile device?

    2. The SMTP queue viewer is clear.

    3. Is the growth of transactions logs explained above sound usual ?( 4 hours we have lost 9GB. It appears that there are approx 11-15 transaction logs generated every minute at 1mb in size)

    4. Are there any other Exchange related files that could be causing disk consumption , other than transactions logs, indexing folders or edb file.


    • Edited by uklogistics Thursday, July 23, 2015 7:58 AM
    Thursday, July 23, 2015 7:56 AM
  • You're right, it can be hard to nail this down.

    1. You can look in the IIS logs.  Are they unusually large as well?

    3. A growth of log files means you have transactions being processed.  That number may be small or it may be large depending on your amount of expected traffic.  That number doesn't seem large to me, but maybe my experiences are with larger environments than yours.

    4. Sure there are.  You're welcome to search for them.


    Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."

    • Marked as answer by Lynn-Li Tuesday, August 4, 2015 9:25 AM
    Thursday, July 23, 2015 3:58 PM