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Turning on Disk Protect always results in "Corrupted Cache File" error RRS feed

  • Question

  • After the mandatory reboot when turning on WDP, the single restricted account does not show on the login screen. Logging in as Administrator results in Windows Steady State popping up with the message that the cache file is corrupted. The cache error continues to occur regardless of whether I choose to attempt a cache file repair or delete the cache, reboot and turn it back on. The restricted user account does of course again become available after I turn off/delete WDP.

     

    This is a 4-month old Dell Optiplex 320 with a 80GB hard disk (55GB partition for system, 10GB partition for user data and the Windows disk cache, and the remainder unallocated). More than 40GB of free space exists on the system partition. In SCT, I had cleared all restrictions from the restricted user account, turned off the SCT disk protect and deleted that 10GB partition, uninstalled the User Profile Cleanup program and Shared Computer Toolkit, then installed Steady State, reusing the existing restricted account (which works fine). I defragmented the system partition and ran disk error check prior to attempting to turn on WDP.

     

    Any suggestions?

    Friday, August 10, 2007 4:41 PM

Answers

  • Hi Vince,

     

    Based on my experience, CHKDSK can only locate problems with the file directory structure and some slight physical defects on the disk. Most of physical defects cannot be detected and repaired by CHKDSK. Please also keep in mind that commercial disk checking programs have a higher success rate for finding and repairing damaged files.

     

    Please understand that file based Windows Disk Protection (WDP) is easier to install and configure than the previous version (SCT). Its disk requirement will be higher than SCT’s independent partition.

     

    WDP needs to track the list of the file fragments and the list of exclude sectors directly.  The driver operates below NTFS and is unable to perform regular file operations on the cache file. As a result, the cache file is very sensitive to the fragmentation level of the disk and the health state of the file system. If the partition’s structure is corrupt, the cache file could not be created and WDP could not be enabled properly. Please keep running chkdsk /f command until you get a clean bill of health before trying to reenable WDP.

     

    As mentioned in SteadyState Handbook, if your computer has already been used and reconfigured by multiple users, as shared computers often are, you should consider reinstalling Windows XP before installing Windows SteadyState. If this problem continues, you may consider performing a clean installation and then installing SteadyState.

     

    Reasons to reinstall Windows XP:

    1. Reformatting and reinstalling is the best way to help create a more secure environment, to help enhance user privacy, and to improve performance and stability.

    2. Reinstalling Windows XP automatically removes the separate partition you may have created when you initially installed Shared Computer Toolkit.

    3. Reinstalling gives you an opportunity to create a new disk partition. A separate disk partition can be useful when using Windows Disk Protection because you can use it to store permanent files and user profiles that you want to retain when the Windows Disk Protection cache is cleared. For more information on saving data and files permanently, see the “Creating Permanent User Profiles on a Separate Partition” section in this handbook. 

     

    Please also understand that formatting will not fix all disk problems either. If there is still disk problem after a full format, you may need to backup all the important files and then replace the hard drive with a new one.

     

    Best Regards,

     

    Thursday, August 16, 2007 10:53 AM

All replies

  •  

    Hi Ed,

     

    From your description, it seems the mandatory reboot caused the dysfunction of disk protection or hard drive issue. Let’s perform the following steps to troubleshoot:

     

    Step 1: Run check disk and defrag the disk again

    -----------------------

    1. Click Start and then Run.

    2. Type in “chkdsk /f” without quotations and press Enter. Type in Y and press Enter.

    3. Restart the computer.

    4. Defrag the drive C again.

     

     

    Step 2: Make sure drive C is not compressed

    -----------------------

    Open “My Computer”, right click drive C and then choose Properties.  In the General tab, make sure the "Compress drive to save disk space" option is unchecked.

     

     

    Step 3: Clean Boot to avoid software conflicts

    -----------------------

    1. Click Start, go to Run, and type "msconfig" in the open box to start the System Configuration Utility.

    2. Click the Services tab, check the "Hide All Microsoft Services" box and click Disable All (if it is not gray). Select “Windows SteadyState Service” check box.

    3. Click the Startup tab, click Disable All and click OK.

    4. Please check this issue again.

     

    Best Regards,

     

     

    Monday, August 13, 2007 9:00 AM
  • Shawn,

     

    I followed your instructions and the cache file still reports as corrupted after creation. What's next?

     

    Ed Ruth

    Tuesday, August 14, 2007 11:14 AM
  • Ed:

     

    I want you to know that I experienced this same issue both as a participant in the Beta program (SCT2) and currently with the released product. I brought it up continuously with the Beta facilitators, forwarded detailed system information, and yet could not get anyone to even reply before the beta program ended. I really rely on this product and am very frustrated at a lack of resolution. However, it is good to know that I am not going crazy and that you are experiencing the same symptom. Smile I will also be working on the issue with the help of your posting and will pass on whatever I find out as well.

     

    Regards,

    Vince Plaza

    Catfive Networks, Inc.

     

    Shawn: It is good to know that you will partner with us on this. Thanks!

    Tuesday, August 14, 2007 7:54 PM
  • Just now, I also follwed Shawn's suggestions to the letter and continue to receive the corruption message after reboot. Anyone else have a thought?

     

    - VP

    Tuesday, August 14, 2007 10:29 PM
  • Hi Ed & Vince,

     

    As Windows Disk Protection (WDP) is very sensitive to the hard drive problem. I recommend running the chkdsk command without parameter. It will provide a report of the current status of the hard drive.

    -------------------

    1. Click Start and then Run.

    2. Type in cmd and press Enter.

    3. Type in chkdsk and press Enter.

     

    Please check if there is error or bad block on the hard drive.

     

    When problem occurs, please also check if there is a cache file (Cache.WDP) under drive C: As the cache file was hidden by default, we need to show the hidden files with the following steps:

    -------------------

    1. Click Start, then click Control Panel, and then click Folder Options.

    2. Click the View tab. Under Hidden files and folders, click "Show hidden files and folders."

    3. Clear the "Hide protected operating system files (Recommended)" check box.

    4. Clear the "Hide extensions for known file type" check box. Click OK.

     

    If Cache.WDP exists, we can manually delete it with the following steps:

    -------------------

    1. Restart your computer and start pressing the F8 key on your keyboard.

    2. When the Windows Advanced Options menu appears, select Safe Mode, and then press Enter.

    3. Log onto Windows by using the Administrator account or any user account with the Administrator privileges.

    4. Delete the Cache.WDP file under drive C. Restart the computer.

    5. Start SteadyState, “Cache File Is Corrupted” windows will appear.

    6. Select “Uninstall Windows Disk Protection and delete the corrupted cache file” and click OK.

     

    After that, please check whether WDP can be enabled without error or not. If this issue remains, we may need to format the hard drive to get this issue resolved in a timely manner. 

     

    Regards,

    Wednesday, August 15, 2007 9:57 AM
  • Shawn:

     

    Following this series of steps, I notice a couple of things. First, the CHKDSK run without the /F parameter reports errors. Second, after running with /F, the errors remain. I also tried it with the recovering bad sectors option. I have attached the event viewer and command prompt output. So, my question is off the SteadyState topic. What type of errors would not be repairable by CHKDSK? How sensitive is the Cache file creation process? I never ran into these kind of issues with SCT1? Admittedly, I like not having the separate partition.

     

    *************** Command  Prompt ***************************

    D:\Users\vince.plaza>chkdsk c:
    The type of the file system is NTFS.

    WARNING!  F parameter not specified.
    Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.

    CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 3)...
    File verification completed.
    CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 3)...
    Index verification completed.
    CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3
    Security descriptor verification completed.
    Correcting errors in the Volume Bitmap.
    Windows found problems with the file system.
    Run CHKDSK with the /F (fix) option to correct the

      32772568 KB total disk space.
      22495244 KB in 44837 files.
         12724 KB in 4610 indexes.
             0 KB in bad sectors.
        117876 KB in use by the system.
         65536 KB occupied by the log file.
      10146724 KB available on disk.

          4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
       8193142 total allocation units on disk.
       2536681 allocation units available on disk.

     

    ********************** Event Viewer ******************************

    Event Type: Information
    Event Source: Winlogon
    Event Category: None
    Event ID: 1001
    Date:  8/15/2007
    Time:  10:44:45 AM
    User:  N/A
    Computer: PIGWIDGEON
    Description:
    Checking file system on C:
    The type of the file system is NTFS.

    A disk check has been scheduled.
    Windows will now check the disk.                        
    Cleaning up 23 unused index entries from index $SII of file 0x9.
    Cleaning up 23 unused index entries from index $SDH of file 0x9.
    Cleaning up 23 unused security descriptors.
    CHKDSK is verifying file data (stage 4 of 5)...
    File data verification completed.
    CHKDSK is verifying free space (stage 5 of 5)...
    Free space verification is complete.

      32772568 KB total disk space.
      12342196 KB in 44802 files.
         12720 KB in 4599 indexes.
             0 KB in bad sectors.
        117872 KB in use by the system.
         65536 KB occupied by the log file.
      20299780 KB available on disk.

          4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
       8193142 total allocation units on disk.
       5074945 allocation units available on disk.

    Internal Info:
    90 c2 00 00 04 c1 00 00 25 f3 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........%.......
    ab 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 38 01 00 00 00 00 00 00  ........8.......
    9e 1b ff 00 00 00 00 00 88 34 e5 0d 00 00 00 00  .........4......
    0e 81 69 02 00 00 00 00 82 a6 64 08 01 00 00 00  ..i.......d.....
    f2 6e 65 cf 00 00 00 00 98 96 df ef 01 00 00 00  .ne.............
    99 9e 36 00 00 00 00 00 18 3a 07 00 02 af 00 00  ..6......:......
    00 00 00 00 00 d0 4e f1 02 00 00 00 f7 11 00 00  ......N.........

    Windows has finished checking your disk.
    Please wait while your computer restarts.

     

    Regards,

    Vince

     

     

    Wednesday, August 15, 2007 10:52 PM
  • Hi Vince,

     

    Based on my experience, CHKDSK can only locate problems with the file directory structure and some slight physical defects on the disk. Most of physical defects cannot be detected and repaired by CHKDSK. Please also keep in mind that commercial disk checking programs have a higher success rate for finding and repairing damaged files.

     

    Please understand that file based Windows Disk Protection (WDP) is easier to install and configure than the previous version (SCT). Its disk requirement will be higher than SCT’s independent partition.

     

    WDP needs to track the list of the file fragments and the list of exclude sectors directly.  The driver operates below NTFS and is unable to perform regular file operations on the cache file. As a result, the cache file is very sensitive to the fragmentation level of the disk and the health state of the file system. If the partition’s structure is corrupt, the cache file could not be created and WDP could not be enabled properly. Please keep running chkdsk /f command until you get a clean bill of health before trying to reenable WDP.

     

    As mentioned in SteadyState Handbook, if your computer has already been used and reconfigured by multiple users, as shared computers often are, you should consider reinstalling Windows XP before installing Windows SteadyState. If this problem continues, you may consider performing a clean installation and then installing SteadyState.

     

    Reasons to reinstall Windows XP:

    1. Reformatting and reinstalling is the best way to help create a more secure environment, to help enhance user privacy, and to improve performance and stability.

    2. Reinstalling Windows XP automatically removes the separate partition you may have created when you initially installed Shared Computer Toolkit.

    3. Reinstalling gives you an opportunity to create a new disk partition. A separate disk partition can be useful when using Windows Disk Protection because you can use it to store permanent files and user profiles that you want to retain when the Windows Disk Protection cache is cleared. For more information on saving data and files permanently, see the “Creating Permanent User Profiles on a Separate Partition” section in this handbook. 

     

    Please also understand that formatting will not fix all disk problems either. If there is still disk problem after a full format, you may need to backup all the important files and then replace the hard drive with a new one.

     

    Best Regards,

     

    Thursday, August 16, 2007 10:53 AM
  • Shawn,

     

    The cache file was not present because I had already deleted it. I have run chkdsk /F several times, followed by chkdsk each time without any arguments. The only error present each time I run chkdsk without arguments is that it wants to delete the index for a ~DF????? file that is created at each startup. This minor error would not seem to affect the ability to create the cache file. The event log does not show any additional errors after chkdsk /F.

    I have also run Dell's extensive diagnostics on the hard disk and it is in perfect shape. I do not see reformatting the drive as a useful option.

     

    Ed Ruth

    Thursday, August 16, 2007 2:29 PM
  • Hi Ed,

     

    Thank you for your feedback.

     

    I understand that an index error will be created at each startup. The index error may be a minor error. However, I doubt the root cause of it. A minor error should have been fixed by the CHKDSK command once for all. If the problem is caused by some startup programs or services, we can also avoid it using Safe Mode or Clean Boot mode. Obviously, that’s not the case.  Reformatting may be a little aggressive, however, it should be an efficient troubleshooting manner, especially under the current situations.

     

    Regards,

    Friday, August 17, 2007 9:05 AM
  • Shawn,

     

    OK, I will get back to you after I've had time to go on site for this computer. To date I've been doing all this via remote control.

     

    Ed Ruth

    Friday, August 17, 2007 11:07 AM
  • I am at the same place Ed is. I won't be able to schedule a rebuild for awhile, but will follow up with this post after I do with the results. Thank you both for your information and efforts.

     

    - Vince

    Friday, August 17, 2007 3:01 PM
  • Hi Ed & Vince,

     

    Thank you for your feedback on this issue. If there is any update, please feel free to post the information here and I will be glad to help.

     

    Best Regards,

    Monday, August 20, 2007 8:23 AM
  • I believe I have some further useful info re this issue after testing on about 20 computers, all identical Dell Optiplex 320 models. The inability to create a Steady State cache file (corrupted cache file error) only occurs on those computers that were upgraded from the Shared Computer Toolkit (SCT). I also had the problem occur on Dell Dimension 3100 computers that were upgraded. A new computer or one on which I wipe clean and reinstall Win XP Pro has no problem creating the cache file.

     

    Ergo, it would appear that there is something not removed (or restored) during the SCT uninstall that interferes with the Steady State cache file.

     

    Any hints on where I can look to manually remove or restore whatever is not accomplished by the SCT uninstall?

     

    Ed Ruth

    Friday, November 23, 2007 2:00 PM
  •  

    Ed: Have you switched to the 2.5 beta at this point? If not which version did you test with. Great insight by the way. The system I was having the issue with was also upgraded from SCT.

     

    Vince

    Friday, November 23, 2007 6:35 PM
  • No, haven't seen the Beta. Waiting for Microasoft reply to the issue.

    Friday, November 23, 2007 8:15 PM
  • Hi Ed & Vince,

     

    I understand that it seems this issue only occurs on those computers which were upgrade from SCT.

     

    Can you reproduce this issue on your side? I also made a local test on my computer (Dell Precision 330):

     

    1. Install SCT and make some changes.

    2. Restore the changes, remove SCT from Add/Remove Programs.

    3. Install SteadyState and enable WDP. (No problem)

     

    By the way, SteadyState 2.5 Beta has been released. Please feel free to try it if you have interest

     

    Windows SteadyState 2.5 Beta

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=4de91d3a-69f4-4d7b-94b1-c69b8be029f4&DisplayLang=en

     

    Regards,

    Monday, November 26, 2007 3:43 AM
  • Shawn,

     

    That is what I already did on many computers per my previous post. The only difference would be that the PC's I used were in a production environment for varying periods of time before I upgraded them to Steady State. Note that in all cases Disk Protection was enabled on the SCT computers. I of course disabled Disk Protection and removed all settings from SCT before uninstalling it.

     

    Ed Ruth

    Monday, November 26, 2007 11:29 AM
  • Hi Ed,

     

    Thank you for your feedback. I reviewed all the steps we have performed and would like to confirm the following questions:

     

    1. Have you reinstalled the system to check this issue?

    2. Is there still index error when running chkdsk command?

    3. Please let me know the size of your C drive, and how much free space is left now.

     

    Please help me collect the following files for further research:

     

    1. System Information

    ===============

    1. Press Start, Run and type in “msinfo32” without quotations. Press OK.

    2. Choose Save from the File menu and save it as an NFO file to Desktop.

    3. Find the file, right-click on this file, click "Send To", and click "Compressed (zipped) Folder".

    4. Send the compressed file to me at v-shshao@microsoft.com

     

    2. Event Logs

    ===============

    1. Click Start and choose Run. Then input "eventvwr" (without the quotation marks) and press Enter.

    2. Right click the Application Log and choose Save Log file As. Save the log file as app.evt.

    3. Right click the System Log and choose Save Log file As. Save the log file as sys.evt.

    4. Please send these two files to my email account: v-shshao@microsoft.com

     

    Regards,

    Tuesday, November 27, 2007 2:58 AM
  • Shawn, I just emailed you the two files you requested. The app.evt file shows a startup followed by attempting to create the cache file, the required reboot afterwards and finally the reboot to clear the cache file which reported it was corrupted.

     

    In addition, on the reboot after creating the cache file, the System Event log had a new error - Event 7023, VCFSVC service terminated with the following error: Incorrect function"

     

    No, there was not still an index error - that was on a different machine than the one I'm using for testing.

     

    On all the machines, the C: drive partition is about 60GB with about 50GB free. The remaining 20GB of the 80GB hard disk is a separate partition used for persistent user data (My Documents), the event logs, and Temporary Internet Files.

     

    I will next rebuild the test machine from scratch and report back afterwards.

     

    Ed Ruth

     

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 6:05 PM
  • Hi Ed,

     

    Thank you for your update. I have received your attachments.

     

    From the system information, I still found many startup programs. To avoid software conflicts, I recommend we perform a Clean Boot again to double check this issue. Please also temporarily stop your security programs such as Norton antivirus and Spyware Doctor.

     

    I have included the steps again

    -----------------------

    1. Click Start, go to Run, and type "msconfig" in the open box to start the System Configuration Utility.

    2. Click the Services tab, check the "Hide All Microsoft Services" box and click Disable All (if it is not gray). Select “Windows SteadyState Service” check box.

    3. Click the Startup tab, click Disable All and click OK.

    4. Restart to check this issue again.

     

    If there is any update on this issue, feel free to post back.

     

    Regards,

     

    Friday, November 30, 2007 11:32 AM
  • Hi Shawn,

     

    I think we are going in circles here. Sometime ago I attempted a cache file creation from a squeaky clean boot several times on different machines that had been upgraded from SCT and it still did not work. At the moment, my test PC now has a clean, unformatted hard disk in it and I will be doing a fresh install of Windows XP this weekend.

     

    I should also mention that on the many machines that have Steady State that was not an upgrade from SCT, the cache file creation went perfectly with all the startup programs you saw in my logs running, including Symantec AntiVirus Corporate Edition, Spyware Doctor and Spyware Blaster.

     

    Ed Ruth

    DataNet Services, Inc.

    Friday, November 30, 2007 1:08 PM
  • Hi,

     

    I hope clean install works.

     

    Based on my experience, problems are usually caused by hardware or software factors. The Clean Boot steps will eliminate the software factors. This can be an efficient way to narrow down the problem.

     

    If there is any update, feel free to post back.

     

    Best Regards,  

    Tuesday, December 4, 2007 12:35 PM
  • Shawn,

     

    The OptiPlex 320 that I rebuilt from scratch had no problems creating the disk protection cache. The software installed and its configuration is identical to the machines that experience the corrupted cache error wit the sole exception that this machine was not upgraded to Steady State from SCT. The last thing I did was install Steady State, configure and lock down the user account, defragment and then create the cache file with ALL startup software running, including Symantec Endpoint protection, Spyware Doctor, Spyware Blaster and all the other items you noted in the MSINFO file I sent you.

     

    I say again, the only difference with the many machines that do or do not experience the corrupted cache error is that the error always occurs when the PC has been upgraded to Steady State from SCT and has never occurred when SCT did not  previously exist on the PC. Also, I stress again that the error still occurs after an upgrade from SCT when attempting to create the cache file with a clean boot.

     

    I believe that the system event log entry I mentioned in my previous post is significant:

    ---------------------- 

    "On the reboot after creating the cache file, the System Event log had a new error - Event 7023, VCFSVC service terminated with the following error: Incorrect function"

    ----------------------

    I believe the VCFSVC service is tied to the Steady State cache file. Would you please research this error?

     

    Thanks,

    Ed Ruth

    DataNet Services, Inc.

    Thursday, December 6, 2007 12:47 PM
  • Shawn,

     

    Have you done any research on the VCFSVC service error I told you about?

     

    Thanks,

    Ed Ruth

    Monday, December 24, 2007 2:29 PM
  • Hi Ed,

    Can you describe the steps you took to upgrade SCT to SteadyState?  There's no real "upgrade" per se, so we expect that SCT is fully uninstalled before SteadyState.  That being the case, it's a mystery what it could be leaving behind that causes WDP errors.  Is there any chance that SCT's version of disk protection is somehow still enabled? 

    Thanks,
    Rob Elmer
    Development Lead
    Windows SteadyState
    Monday, December 24, 2007 6:59 PM
  • For Rob Elmer, (Development Lead, Windows Steady State)

     

    I uninstalled SCT by first disabling disk protection and rebooting, then unlocking the user profile and removing all restriction settings, then uninstalled SCT, then ensured that the SCT program folder was deleted, then deleted the SCT protection disk partition and added that now unused space to the user persistent data partition. I then installed Steady State, set all restrictions and locked the user profile. Finally, I ran chkdsk with no errors and disk defragmenter, followed immediately by attempting to create the WDP cache.

     

    Given that the SCT program folder is absent and that I deleted the SCT disk protection partition, I doubt that SCT's version of disk protection is still running. However, please provide me with the name of the service (or whatever else) I should look for in the registry and I will confirm.

     

    I still believe that the Steady State VFCSVC service error  ("incorrect function") in the event log is significant and that system event log entry occurs on each of the 20-odd computers that were upgraded from SCT when WDP is attempted.

     

    Hope this helps,

    Ed Ruth

    DataNet Services, Inc.

    Monday, December 24, 2007 10:27 PM
  • I installed Steady State on a new Dell Vostro and had the same problem when I turned on disk protection. Running chkdsk found errors. Running chkdsk /f fixed the error(s) and then disk protection was sucessfully turned on.

     

    Thanks for the help!  For you who are still having problems after running chkdsk /f and clearing the error:

     

    My next step would have been to run Spinrite on the disk to have it fix the problems. I'd rather try that than to format the hard drive and reinstall Windows and then reconfigure everything before reinstalling Steady State.  Just a suggestion that may save you time if you have a lot of computer with the same disk issues.

     

    Bill

     

    Friday, January 25, 2008 11:56 PM
  • Just a thought here, guys. Ran into this same problem on a computer today. Make sure no Anti-Virus software is running while you try and create the partition. If it is running, shut it down, and try once more. If this does not work, use task manager to end all tasks associated with this program.

    If you still encounter the problem, end all unecessary tasks. It seemed as if the task responsible for creating the partition hung when it was not able to complete. Disabled AVG Free, and then ending all other unneeded processes, enabled this to work. A reboot after removing AVG was not necessary.

    Hope this helps.
    Wednesday, February 6, 2008 9:44 PM
  • So did you disable AVG or remove AVG? It is not clear from your post.

    Friday, February 15, 2008 3:31 PM
  • Rob:

     

    Ed is still waiting for someone from your team to respond to his service error question. Has this been researched yet? Thanks.

    Friday, February 15, 2008 3:43 PM
  • Hi,

     

    We haven't seen this error in our tests.  Does this repro on a clean install of XP?

     

    Sunday, February 17, 2008 4:16 AM
  • For Rob Elmer [MSFT]:

     

    Rob, it has never been an issue with clean installs of XP. If you will please re-read this entire thread, and in particular my reply of Dec 24, 2007 to your query of same date, you will be reminded that the issue relates solely to problems after uninstalling SCT and then installing Steady State. I've been going in circles on this for so long that I'm just ready to give up.

     

    Ed Ruth,

    DataNet Services, Inc.

    Sunday, February 17, 2008 12:41 PM
  • I am not surprised Ed is getting frustrated, as he has done an excellent job of tracking down potential root causes and has not received answers to specific questions. Quite frankly, if Microsoft could not reproduce the error, it would have been in there interest to buy or borrow the machine from Ed that could clearly demonstrate it.

     

    I have not been as thorough, but did spend days on this as it was an important part of my family-safe computing strategy and I had such good luck with the SCT product. I followed all reasonable advice in this posting with a non-clean machine that had previously had SCT installed and failed to resolve the issue. I then built a brand new, absolutely clean machine with Vista Ultimate and Steady State 2.5. The Disk Protect issue was still there and looked identical to the first machine (described multiple times in this post). I remain convinced that it is caused by installing the "Users" (documents and settings) folder on a drive other than the system drive, but have no proof of this and there is no common sense reason why this would be so.

     

    Soooo, Microsoft had a product that I was recommending strongly (SCT) and replaced it with a product I have not been able to recommend since its release. A shame, really, because to fight non-ROM based root kits, it was a really great approach. Sadly, I demonstrated the Disk Protect issue during the initial beta for Steady State, brought it up in phone meetings with the development team, and was also "given the brush off". I am with Ed, though. If this is as serious as Microsoft is going to take this, then I need to walk away from it, too. Thanks again to Ed for the excellent and time-consuming analysis.

    Sunday, February 17, 2008 3:40 PM
  • Damn, I am having a similar problem Sad
    I am guessing there was no true resolution to the problem? Sad


    Thursday, November 13, 2008 8:12 AM
  • Sorry. I gave up! Let us know what you find out.  I am still interested in the product.

     

    Thursday, November 13, 2008 6:53 PM
  • Windows Disk Protection installation was not successful

    After I tried to turn on the disk protection I got that messages. I saw that the Cache Files which was created during the process (Cache.WDP) were linked to the Windows document and imaging program. I deleted the link to the *.wdp data and tried again. Now its working...

    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 1:43 PM