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available physical memory RRS feed

  • Question

  • i have an intel corei5 and it is running smoothly but what concerns me is that i have a 2gb ram but the available physical memory is 658mb. i have an onboard graphic card, does it affect the available memory?. i need help please. how can i increase this. do i have to buy an additional ram?

    Thanks in advance :)

    Friday, October 14, 2011 7:56 AM

Answers

  • Available memory is a memory Windows can easily use for other needs. In general its value is not a sign for anything.

    Look at Commited line, if it is more than 1.2-1.5 RAM size during normal computer usage I'd recommend to add more RAM. 

    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:45 AM
    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 8:49 AM
    Answerer
  • Hi,

     

    The Physical Memory available depends on other factors such as hardware reserved, in use memory.

     

    Please look into Resource Monitor, Memory tab.

     

    The blue is up for grabs by more programs/processes/data

    The orange is temporary and still needs to be written back to disk

    The green is your running programs/processes/data

    The grey is hardware reserved such as graphic card

     

    Best Regards,

    Niki


    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" on the post that helps you, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:45 AM
    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 9:58 AM
  • i have an intel corei5 and it is running smoothly but what concerns me is that i have a 2gb ram but the available physical memory is 658mb. i have an onboard graphic card, does it affect the available memory?. i need help please. how can i increase this. do i have to buy an additional ram?

    Onboard graphics generally use what is called "shared memory" ie your main RAM as it's graphics memory, instead of having its own dedicated memory.  Many PCs with onboard graphics will allow you some options, in BIOS, for changing how much RAM to use for graphics.  All this means is yes onboard graphics with shared memory will reduce the amount of available memory for programs.

    You can increase the amount of available RAM in a number of ways such as

    • adding more RAM
    • adding a graphics card with its own memory
    • not running so much stuff

    The best options are the first 2.  They are also usually the least complex to do.

    The cheapest option is to not run so much stuff.  There are many background services and programs that may be running that you don't need to run, or don't need to run all the time.  There is a lot of information around about stopping services and startup programs that run in the background doing not much most of the time and taking up some RAM all the time.

    Before you start cutting back on what is running at start up, I would advise writing down what is running at the moment so that when you disable a bunch of it you can know latter on what is the default and expected settings.

     

    For a modern OS on a PC with only 2GB RAM and shared graphics memory, I'm not surprised that it only has 658MB available ram.  With 8GB RAM and dedicated graphics memory, with "just internet browsing" I've only got 4GB available ram.  However I am a bit of a heavy user, and one of my 'background processes' is media center, which is recording a TV show.

     

    Also

    The commit size on my machine is currently 5GB for my normal 'just net surfing' usage.  Though, at boot up (as soon as I can read it) I'd expect this to be 1~2GB but not under my 'normal usage'.  I think Igor means to say that if the commit size is approaching the amount of physical RAM during normal usage then install more ram.

    If you're going to use this method, load all of the applications and files you'd like to be able to use at the same time even though it slows down your PC a lot.  Do this for any combination of programs you'd like to be able to use and see what the commit size is then.

    A rule of thumb I have is that about 50% of RAM should be for disk cache (unless you have an SSD HDD which I don't have a rule of thumb for).  So whatever the maximum commit size is for your usage patterns, double that, and that's a fair indicator of an amount of RAM that would make your system fly.  I find that once the ram available for cache (cached + free) falls below 50% total ram, then system performance suffers a bit.


    • Edited by BeowulfNode42 Friday, October 21, 2011 3:12 PM improved readbility
    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:45 AM
    Friday, October 21, 2011 3:08 PM

All replies

  • Available memory is a memory Windows can easily use for other needs. In general its value is not a sign for anything.

    Look at Commited line, if it is more than 1.2-1.5 RAM size during normal computer usage I'd recommend to add more RAM. 

    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:45 AM
    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 8:49 AM
    Answerer
  • Hi,

     

    The Physical Memory available depends on other factors such as hardware reserved, in use memory.

     

    Please look into Resource Monitor, Memory tab.

     

    The blue is up for grabs by more programs/processes/data

    The orange is temporary and still needs to be written back to disk

    The green is your running programs/processes/data

    The grey is hardware reserved such as graphic card

     

    Best Regards,

    Niki


    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" on the post that helps you, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:45 AM
    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 9:58 AM
  • i have an intel corei5 and it is running smoothly but what concerns me is that i have a 2gb ram but the available physical memory is 658mb. i have an onboard graphic card, does it affect the available memory?. i need help please. how can i increase this. do i have to buy an additional ram?

    Thanks in advance :)


    Have you try reseating the ram? Yes, onboard graphic does take up some memory from the ram. You could infact allocate how much memory you want in cmos setup>share memory (different bios might have different setting though.

    Alternatively get a pcie graphic card if you don't want the memory to be share

    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 11:33 AM
    Answerer
  • Thanks Alot :) so i'm already using the memory and have more available too.. 

    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 9:14 AM
  • It is around 1.15 .. Should i add more RAM?..and if i have to then how much do you suggest?

    Thanks :)

    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 9:16 AM
  • How do you reseat a Ram?

    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 9:19 AM
  • It is around 1.15 .. Should i add more RAM?..and if i have to then how much do you suggest?

    If you satisfied with your computer's work, it is not nesessary.

    Do you have 32-bit or 64-bit Windows?

    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 9:24 AM
    Answerer
  • 64 bit

    Friday, October 21, 2011 2:28 PM
  • i have an intel corei5 and it is running smoothly but what concerns me is that i have a 2gb ram but the available physical memory is 658mb. i have an onboard graphic card, does it affect the available memory?. i need help please. how can i increase this. do i have to buy an additional ram?

    Onboard graphics generally use what is called "shared memory" ie your main RAM as it's graphics memory, instead of having its own dedicated memory.  Many PCs with onboard graphics will allow you some options, in BIOS, for changing how much RAM to use for graphics.  All this means is yes onboard graphics with shared memory will reduce the amount of available memory for programs.

    You can increase the amount of available RAM in a number of ways such as

    • adding more RAM
    • adding a graphics card with its own memory
    • not running so much stuff

    The best options are the first 2.  They are also usually the least complex to do.

    The cheapest option is to not run so much stuff.  There are many background services and programs that may be running that you don't need to run, or don't need to run all the time.  There is a lot of information around about stopping services and startup programs that run in the background doing not much most of the time and taking up some RAM all the time.

    Before you start cutting back on what is running at start up, I would advise writing down what is running at the moment so that when you disable a bunch of it you can know latter on what is the default and expected settings.

     

    For a modern OS on a PC with only 2GB RAM and shared graphics memory, I'm not surprised that it only has 658MB available ram.  With 8GB RAM and dedicated graphics memory, with "just internet browsing" I've only got 4GB available ram.  However I am a bit of a heavy user, and one of my 'background processes' is media center, which is recording a TV show.

     

    Also

    The commit size on my machine is currently 5GB for my normal 'just net surfing' usage.  Though, at boot up (as soon as I can read it) I'd expect this to be 1~2GB but not under my 'normal usage'.  I think Igor means to say that if the commit size is approaching the amount of physical RAM during normal usage then install more ram.

    If you're going to use this method, load all of the applications and files you'd like to be able to use at the same time even though it slows down your PC a lot.  Do this for any combination of programs you'd like to be able to use and see what the commit size is then.

    A rule of thumb I have is that about 50% of RAM should be for disk cache (unless you have an SSD HDD which I don't have a rule of thumb for).  So whatever the maximum commit size is for your usage patterns, double that, and that's a fair indicator of an amount of RAM that would make your system fly.  I find that once the ram available for cache (cached + free) falls below 50% total ram, then system performance suffers a bit.


    • Edited by BeowulfNode42 Friday, October 21, 2011 3:12 PM improved readbility
    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:45 AM
    Friday, October 21, 2011 3:08 PM
  • Thanks .. that helped.... alot :)

     

    Saturday, October 22, 2011 10:32 AM
  •  I think Igor means to say that if the commit size is approaching the amount of physical RAM during normal usage then install more ram.
    Commited memory may be more than the physical RAM because it does mot mean "used".
    Saturday, October 22, 2011 10:39 AM
    Answerer
  • 64 bit


    You may add more memory. I think in most cases there will not be noticeable performace increase nevertheless adding RAM will be useful.
    Saturday, October 22, 2011 10:42 AM
    Answerer
  •  I think Igor means to say that if the commit size is approaching the amount of physical RAM during normal usage then install more ram.
    Commited memory may be more than the physical RAM because it does mot mean "used".

    yes that is true committed memory can exceed physical ram size, but it'll be fairly slow going on that pc if committed is more than physical.  There are exceptions to this guideline but I think it's a fairly good rule of thumb.

     

    Though the best guideline for knowing when to add more ram is when you have significant HDD activity at times other than opening/closing applications or files, such as when switching between open applications, and this delay bothers you.

     

    Recently I upgraded from 4GB -> 8GB ram and am noticing a significant difference in performance, even though many of the apps running are 32bit apps only capable of being allocated 2GB each.  The point for me, is that I can have many of those applications running simultaneously.  While we might not need a 64bit application for the majority of programs it is definitely time for a 64bit OS, capable of using more than 3~4GB of RAM.

     

    Saturday, October 22, 2011 2:26 PM
  • I tend to use a lot of programs at once so I currently have 5GB of RAM installed.

    I doubt I will need more based on the long term use of the task manager watching my machine load

    the only real demand for x64 windows is some recent FPS titles that are considered brutal

    5GB is not that much for someone who "uses a lot of programs at once"

    at one stage I was struggling by on a machine at work with only 4GB on XP (usable about 3.7GB on that machine) and I was running as a standard fairly 'minimal' load

    • Outlook with several MS Exchange hosted mailboxes + some IMAP + pst files
    • thunderbird for testing compatibility
    • firefox, google chrome, and IE with 100~200 tabs open between them
    • MS Management Console with full suite of AD snap-ins loaded for 4 different servers including an Exchange server
    • SQL server management with a dozen views and queries open
    • local MS SQL server Express for testing away from the production servers
    • local MySQL server and management console
    • remote desktop and VNC windows to various servers
    • 3-4 Adobe PDF reader windows in addition to the ones open in the web browser
    • 2-3 PuTTY windows
    • programming text editor with 5-6 files open

    then on top of that I'd sometimes run some of

    • 1-2 virtual PCs (even small ones really taxed the XP machine)
    • Excel with 2-3 workbooks each with about 30x10000 data cells going to several different pivot charts
    • crystal reporting editor
    • custom business ERP program
    • custom supply chain management software
    • software development IDE
    • remote backup management (for the servers)
    • manual transfers of large amounts of data (usually from backups of the main file server that failed)

    Plus I feel that I'm forgetting quite a lot of programs I used.

    I would have loved a machine with 16GB of ram at that work place, but I had a machine with 4GB and it really chugged until I closed some stuff.

     

    When it comes to RAM, eventually enough is never enough.

    Saturday, October 22, 2011 2:53 PM
  • When it comes to RAM, eventually enough is never enough.


    I have 6 GB RAM and mostly it IS enough for me because task manager shows 0.5-1 GB free. All RAM us used only I start XP mode.
    Saturday, October 22, 2011 3:27 PM
    Answerer