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Standard Edition or Enterprise Edition in App-V RRS feed

  • Question

  • If I put any application(for example MS word) on server and uses application virtualization to access that application in branch offices. Then I think each employee of branch office will use an instance of that application. Am I right ?? My question is that If I want to purchase MS Office then should I go for Standard Edition or Enterprise Edition. Because what I am thinking , I will install standard edition on server and my employees will access that through application virtualization(by creating instances) . Another question, at max how many instances can be created. It depends on server capability or  application capacity?
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 11:04 AM

Answers

  • Hello,

    Yes its possible.

    You would probably be violating just about every license agreement by proceeding in the way that you suggest.

    The load depends on the application, how the application is used and the physical specifications of your server.
    The best way to determine how performance would be effected would probably be to read up on the type of scenario you are suggesting, how the application performs in it and then proceed with actual testing.

    Suggested reading would be Windows 2008 "Terminal Services"
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/rds-product-home.aspx, as there are several whitepapers and both scenarios with app-v / rds available for reviewing.

    /Znack
    • Proposed as answer by znack Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:54 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 4:30 PM
  • Would like to add that Virtualization does not help in licensing. You still have to buy 5 user licenses if there are 5 users. I think you are trying to buy 1 copy of microsoft office and use it for say, 100 machines. This is not not legal unless you have some agreement.
    • Proposed as answer by znack Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:55 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 2:54 PM
  • Hello,

    You will have to purchase a license for every user who will use the software. Regardless of edition.
    Its illegal.

    It will be saved where the user saves it, this depends on how you have configured your clients and how you will configure the server. The most common approach is to redirect any common-paths to a seperated server (aka fileserver) and make the user work against this common workspace.

    If this is not setup (common workspace) the user will have to save on the local-server and thus only reaching the document from the specific server (just like they would with a client, if no common workspace was utilized)

    /Znack
    • Proposed as answer by znack Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:54 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 5:01 PM
  • Hello,

    In regards to what edition you would want to purchase;
    Edition is simply a way to differentiate the product by including more components the "higher" you go into the edition hierarchy.
    As long as your software (or program) is available, you can purchase the edition that suites you. A basic overview is available here;
    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/products/FX101635841033.aspx?ofcresset=1

    In regards to how many instances you can create I am not really sure what you mean by that. Licensing does not change by virtualization so basically the same rules apply that are currently valid.

    /Znack

    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 11:15 AM
  • Hi znck, kirk_tn here is explanation:

     I want to use RemoteApp to access applications that are installed on remote server and the "client" only gets the user interface. Examples are any RDP based connection (Terminal Server) [kirk_tn you spotted right]

    SuperMan you also spotted right:

            I am thinking to use only one copy(license) at server and that application will be available to "clients" through remoteApp.

     Is it possible ??

     Is that legal and what about load... at max how many "client sessions" can be active. It depends on server capability or  application capacity?
    • Proposed as answer by znack Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:55 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 4:16 PM
  • Hello,


    Master, if you wish to be compliant with the licensing terms and avoid overpurchasing my best tip would be to ask a license-specialist from the appropriate company and explain your scenario.

    Depending on the type of licensing your choosing you may or may not have to purchase new licenses. Considering that you have been switching scenarios back and forth, I can't really tell you what you can and cannot do.

    /Znack
    • Proposed as answer by znack Saturday, May 9, 2009 7:03 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Sunday, May 3, 2009 6:08 AM

All replies

  • Hello,

    In regards to what edition you would want to purchase;
    Edition is simply a way to differentiate the product by including more components the "higher" you go into the edition hierarchy.
    As long as your software (or program) is available, you can purchase the edition that suites you. A basic overview is available here;
    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/products/FX101635841033.aspx?ofcresset=1

    In regards to how many instances you can create I am not really sure what you mean by that. Licensing does not change by virtualization so basically the same rules apply that are currently valid.

    /Znack

    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 11:15 AM
  • My requirement is satisfied by both standard as well as enterprise edition.

    I try to explain. I read some where (may be misunderstood) that through virtualization it is possible to have application installed on server and client will access an instance of that application. Is it some other type of virtualization? Client feels like application is running in his/her pc (except authentication).  Making clear that I am saying about remote desktop

    -Master
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 11:49 AM
  • Hello,

    I am really confused...
    1. Your original questions was in regards to licensing, which application virtualization imposes no changes on.
    2. Edition is simply what applications that are included (and has nothing todo with application virtualization)
    3. Application virtualization is purely related to allowing local-execution by streaming or not streaming an application from server (to a client or server)
    4. Now, when you are making this clear regarding remote dekstop, I am becoming more confused.

    How are you planning to use this and for what purpose?

    /Znack
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 11:56 AM
  • Hi,

    as Znakc wrote, "Virtualization" terminology can be confusing.

    To try to keep it easy: "Presentation Virtualization" means, that an application consumes RAM/CPU on a _remote_ machine and the "client" only gets the user interface. Examples are any RDP based connection (Terminal Server), VNC or Citrix Metaframe (=old name) ICA connections.

    If the application runs on the client (consumes RAM/CPU), but is not installed, this is an indication for "Application Virtualization". Thereforre in App-V there are no application execution sessions on the App-V servers: applications execute on the client.

    However, a "Presentation Virtualization Server" can be an "Application Virtualization Client". The application executes on the Terminal Server but is not installed (but virtualized") there.

    Also, be carefull with Citrix Namings, because they call both approches "Application Virtualization" (and the difference is "server side" vs. "client side").

    It's not easy to write about the differences between virtualization technologies - and Software vendors do a good job to "hide" the differences.



    Falko
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 1:30 PM
    Moderator
  • Would like to add that Virtualization does not help in licensing. You still have to buy 5 user licenses if there are 5 users. I think you are trying to buy 1 copy of microsoft office and use it for say, 100 machines. This is not not legal unless you have some agreement.
    • Proposed as answer by znack Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:55 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 2:54 PM
  • Hi znck, kirk_tn here is explanation:

     I want to use RemoteApp to access applications that are installed on remote server and the "client" only gets the user interface. Examples are any RDP based connection (Terminal Server) [kirk_tn you spotted right]

    SuperMan you also spotted right:

            I am thinking to use only one copy(license) at server and that application will be available to "clients" through remoteApp.

     Is it possible ??

     Is that legal and what about load... at max how many "client sessions" can be active. It depends on server capability or  application capacity?
    • Proposed as answer by znack Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:55 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 4:16 PM
  • Hello,

    Yes its possible.

    You would probably be violating just about every license agreement by proceeding in the way that you suggest.

    The load depends on the application, how the application is used and the physical specifications of your server.
    The best way to determine how performance would be effected would probably be to read up on the type of scenario you are suggesting, how the application performs in it and then proceed with actual testing.

    Suggested reading would be Windows 2008 "Terminal Services"
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/rds-product-home.aspx, as there are several whitepapers and both scenarios with app-v / rds available for reviewing.

    /Znack
    • Proposed as answer by znack Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:54 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 4:30 PM

  • You would probably be violating just about every license agreement by proceeding in the way that you suggest.

    Sorry for my poor english but I could not understand the above line. Do you want to say, "It is not legal"?

    If it is not legal then I have to purchase the Enterprise edition with several number of licenses ( = number of employees).
    If it is legal then I can go for standard edition and can save a lot of money (and Few money I will spend to increase RAM and load balancing).


    One more question if user is accessing application using remoteApp and wants to save document then "where it will be saved? At server or at client storage?"


    -Master
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 4:45 PM
  • Hello,

    You will have to purchase a license for every user who will use the software. Regardless of edition.
    Its illegal.

    It will be saved where the user saves it, this depends on how you have configured your clients and how you will configure the server. The most common approach is to redirect any common-paths to a seperated server (aka fileserver) and make the user work against this common workspace.

    If this is not setup (common workspace) the user will have to save on the local-server and thus only reaching the document from the specific server (just like they would with a client, if no common workspace was utilized)

    /Znack
    • Proposed as answer by znack Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:54 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Tuesday, April 28, 2009 5:01 PM
  • Thanks Znack for making my doubts clear. Now this RemoteApp-V related issue is clear.

    I have also posted one query on
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/systemcenter/thread/3e444bd3-3f17-407c-87fd-403a6263f671

    thread. But till now nobody have replied.


    Bye

    -Master

    Wednesday, April 29, 2009 2:44 AM
  • Hello,

    You will have to purchase a license for every user who will use the software.
    One more thing I would like to ask.
    License should be purchased for every user or for every machine.
    For example, if there is sift-wise schedule in which there are 50 machines and 100 employees. First 50 will come in 1st shift and second 50 will come in 2nd shift then how many licenses I need, 50 or 100 ?
    Saturday, May 2, 2009 2:50 AM
  • Hello,

    This depends on the license-agreement. Its called either named users or concurrent users.

    /Znack
    Saturday, May 2, 2009 8:41 AM
  • Suppose If I am having 50 (standard edition) licenses. I was using these licenses to keep office in each machine.
    Now I am moving towards terminal Services(App-V) then can I use those previous 50 licenses or should I purchase new licenses.

    I am thinking that at a time user will access Office Application either from terminal or from local hard-disk( in case if there is network-breakage)  then only one license should work or Do I need to purchase additional one.

    -Master
    Sunday, May 3, 2009 2:37 AM
  • Hello,


    Master, if you wish to be compliant with the licensing terms and avoid overpurchasing my best tip would be to ask a license-specialist from the appropriate company and explain your scenario.

    Depending on the type of licensing your choosing you may or may not have to purchase new licenses. Considering that you have been switching scenarios back and forth, I can't really tell you what you can and cannot do.

    /Znack
    • Proposed as answer by znack Saturday, May 9, 2009 7:03 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aaron.ParkerModerator Saturday, November 17, 2012 3:36 PM
    Sunday, May 3, 2009 6:08 AM
  • Ya, Sure! Thanks!
    Sunday, May 3, 2009 4:00 PM