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How do I setup my TP-Link Router to lease IPs and disable DHCP on Windows Server 2008 R2, all while keeping Active Directory? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am learning to configure Windows Server with Active Directory. I know this question is possible, but I can't find any guides on how to do this, or configure Active Directory with DNS and DHCP.

    I would like to let the router lease out the IP and disable the DHCP on server. I am using Windows Server 2008, with a TP-Link 300M Wireless Router, Model TL-WR841N / TL-WR841ND. I need to learn and know how, with complete step-by-steps, how to use the router as with DHCP leasing and still use Active Directory. Please tell me how this is possible and how I can perform the proper configuration. If I missed a detail, please let me know.

    Sunday, October 30, 2016 4:57 AM

Answers

  • Hello,

    Basic configuration will do the job, just point the DNS to your AD Server(s), instead of external DNS and your good to go.

    That being said, If the network is corporate, should you...

    Where it gets complicated is when it comes to DNS registration of your client computers when your DHCP server is not part of the domain.

    To have DNS registration occurs for your Windows workstations when they boot, you will have to configure option 81 of your third party DHCP. Does this third party solution supports options in their routers? If not, you will have to find another way to have your computers register themself directly to DNS.

    This posts explains how DHCP and DNS interaction works: https://technet.microsoft.com/fr-fr/library/dd145315(v=ws.10).aspx

    Having DHCP talk to your DNS is very important in your network, especially when you need to have access to your computers from your servers or other workstations, like a Shared Folder, WSUS or SCCM, etc.

    Like I mentionned, it's not that it cannot be done, it's very simple to implement, but you will have some overhead to plan.

    Regards,


    Gilles Tremblay
    MCSE Server | Desktop | Messaging | Collaboration | Productivity | Mobility | Cloud Platform and Infrastructure

    Dont forget to mark as Answered if you found this post helpful.

    DISCLAIMER: This post is provided "AS IS" with no warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, and confers no rights. Always test before!


    Sunday, October 30, 2016 1:51 PM

All replies

  • Hello,

    Basic configuration will do the job, just point the DNS to your AD Server(s), instead of external DNS and your good to go.

    That being said, If the network is corporate, should you...

    Where it gets complicated is when it comes to DNS registration of your client computers when your DHCP server is not part of the domain.

    To have DNS registration occurs for your Windows workstations when they boot, you will have to configure option 81 of your third party DHCP. Does this third party solution supports options in their routers? If not, you will have to find another way to have your computers register themself directly to DNS.

    This posts explains how DHCP and DNS interaction works: https://technet.microsoft.com/fr-fr/library/dd145315(v=ws.10).aspx

    Having DHCP talk to your DNS is very important in your network, especially when you need to have access to your computers from your servers or other workstations, like a Shared Folder, WSUS or SCCM, etc.

    Like I mentionned, it's not that it cannot be done, it's very simple to implement, but you will have some overhead to plan.

    Regards,


    Gilles Tremblay
    MCSE Server | Desktop | Messaging | Collaboration | Productivity | Mobility | Cloud Platform and Infrastructure

    Dont forget to mark as Answered if you found this post helpful.

    DISCLAIMER: This post is provided "AS IS" with no warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, and confers no rights. Always test before!


    Sunday, October 30, 2016 1:51 PM
  • Thank you Gilles!

    If I just point DNS to the server, won't the internet connection go down for everyone connected through the router? I am using this as a fail-safe plan, where my business and home computers can connect to the AD domain, but if the server goes down, then I still want everything to have internet access until I get the server back up and running.

    Sunday, October 30, 2016 2:38 PM
  • Yes indeed.

    If you use the TPLink only as a backup plan, what you should do is to have the primary DNS point to your internal DNS Server where your AD resides and the secondary DNS to 8.8.8.8 (Google's DNS).

    If you are planning to do this, your should also configure your Router's DHCP scope range different than the one defined in your Windows Server to avoid overlapping adresses lease, but in the same network.

    Example: Lets say you have a network defined link this:

    • Internal Network: 192.168.1.0 / 24
    • Your Windows Server DHCP Scope Range: 192.168.1.100 to 149 / 24
    • Your TPLink router DHCP Scope Range: 192.168.1.150 to 192.168.199 / 24

    Also what will happen is the fastest DHCP server will respond to DHCP discovery, so you may get the situation that your router may have a lot of leases and your Windows DHCP would be empty, or vice versa. There is no hard and solid way to avoid this to happen... I should say EASY way to avoid this to happen...

    Regards,


    Gilles Tremblay
    MCSE Server | Desktop | Messaging | Collaboration | Productivity | Mobility | Cloud Platform and Infrastructure

    Dont forget to mark as Answered if you found this post helpful.

    DISCLAIMER: This post is provided "AS IS" with no warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, and confers no rights. Always test before!


    • Edited by Gilles Tremblay Sunday, October 30, 2016 3:10 PM Added more description to my post.
    • Proposed as answer by John Lii Monday, October 31, 2016 1:28 AM
    Sunday, October 30, 2016 2:55 PM